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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



^tS'Cyj 



DIRECTOR OF THE MINT 



TO THE 



SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY 



FOII THE 



FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1801. 



WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 

1891. 



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Treasury Department. 
Document No. 1468. 
Director of the Mint . 



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REPORT 



OF 

THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Treasury Department, 

Bureau of the Mint, 
Washington , I). 0., November 1, 1891. 

{Sir : As required by section 345 of the Revised Statutes, I have the 
honor to hand you herewith a report of the operations of the mints and 
assay offices of the United States for the fiscal year ended June 30, 
1891, the present being the nineteenth annual report of the Director of 
the Mint and the third of the same series signed by me. 

DEPOSITS AND PURCHASES OF GOLD AND SILVER. 



Gold . — The gold deposits at the mints and assay offices of the United 
States during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1891, including gold con- 
tained in silver deposits and purchases, aggregated 3,204,880.200 standard 
ounces, of the value of $59,025,078.08, against $49,228,823.50 in the pre- 
ceding fiscal year, an increase of $10,390,854.52. 

Of the gold deposited, 2,000,111.797 standard ounces, of the value of 
$48,485,800.82, were original deposits, and 598,708.403 standard ounces, 
of the value of $11,139,877.20, were redeposits. 

Of theredeposits $4,001,070.52 consisted of fine bars bearing the stamp 
of the United States assay office at New York, being large gold bars 
redeposited for small; and $0,538,800.74 were unparted bars, represent- 
ing the deposits at the minor assay offices shipped to the mint at Phila- 
delphia, for refining and coinage. 

Of the gold bullion received at Government institutions during the 
fiscal year, $31,555,110.85 was the product of our own mines, against 
$30,474,900;25 of the same class of bullion deposited in the preceding 
fiscal year, an increase of $1,080,210.00. 

Of the domestic gold bullion received at Government institutions 
during the year, $17,344,451.21 were fine bars bearing the stamp of 
private refineries, and $14,210,005.04 were unrefined domestic bullion. 

The distribution among producing States and Territories of the unre- 



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4 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



fined gold deposited at Government institutions during the year will 
be found in a table in the appendix to this report. 

Foreign gold bullion of the value of $4,054,822.80, and foreign gold 
coin of the value of $8,250,303.80, a total foreign gold of $12,311,120.00, 
were deposited and melted at the mints and assay offices during the 
last fiscal year. 

Light-weight domestic gold coins were melted for recoinage of the 
value of $583,847.10, and old material, consisting of jewelry, plate, etc., 
containing gold of the value of $4,035,710.15. 

Silver . — The deposits and purchases of silver, including silver con- 
tained in gold deposits, aggregated during the last fiscal year 
71,809,663.92 standard ounces, of the coining value ($1.16 T 4 T per standard 
ounce, or $1.2929 per fine ounce) of $83,630,154.31, against $43,565,135.15 
in the preceding year, an increase of $40,065,019.16. 

Of the silver received at Government institutions during the year 
10,006,707.61 standard ounces, of the coining value of $11,644,168.84) 
were redeposits, so that the original deposits of silver aggregated 
61,862,956.31 standard ounces, of the coining value of $71,985,985.47. 

Of the silver received, 52,744,990.07 standard ounces, of the coining 
value of $61,375,988.45, consisted of fine bars bearing the stamp of 
private refineries in the United States. All such bars are classified at 
Government institutions as of domestic production. As a matter of 
fact, such bars contain foreign as well as domestic silver, as nearly all 
the silver imported into the United States in the form of base bars, or 
contained in miscellaneous ores, is reduced at private works in conjunc- 
tion with domestic ores, and no distinction is made in the resulting 
product. 

Of the domestic silver bullion deposited at the mints during the year, 
3,551,805.12 standard ounces, of the coining value of $4,133,009.58, was 
unrefined silver from the mines of the United States. 

The distribution of the unrefined silver deposited at Government in- 
stitutions among producing States and Territories, is exhibited in a table 
in the appendix to this report. 

Foreign silver bullion, distinctively known as such, containing 
1,964,342.47 standard ounces, of the coining value of $2,285,780.32, and 
foreign silver coin, containing 2,189,902.34 standard ounces, of the coin- 
ing value of $2,548,249.99, a total foreign silver of $4,834,030.31, was 
received at the mints and melted during the year. 

Light-weight silver coins of the United States, principally subsidiary 
pieces transferred from the Treasury to the mints for recoinage, were 
melted during the year, containing 705,253.82 standard ounces of silver, 
of the coining value of $820,658.98. 

In addition, trade dollars were sold to the Government as bullion and 
melted, containing 3,248.47 standard ounces of silver, of the coining 
value of $3,780.04. 

Old silver, consisting of jewelry, plate, etc., was melted during the 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



5 



year, containing 703,414.02 standard ounces, of the coining value of 
$818,518.11. 

The coining value of the gold and silver (not including redeposits) 
received at the mints and assay offices of the United States each fiscal 
year since 1880 is exhibited in the following table: 

Value of the Gold and Silver (not including Redeposits) Received at 
the Mints and Assay Offices, 1880-1891. 



Fiscal years. 


Gold. 


Silver 

(coining value). 


Total value. 


1880 


$98, 835, 090 


$34, 640, 522 


$133, 475, 618 


1881 


130,833,102 


30, 791, 140 


161, 624, 248 


1882 


66, 756, 652 


33, 720, 491 


100, 477, 143 


1883 


46, 347, 106 


36, 869, 834 


83, 216, 940 


1884 


46, 326, 678 


36, 520, 290 


82, 846, 968 


1885 


52, 894, 075 


36* 789, 774 


89, 683, 849 


1886 


44, 909, 749 


35, 494, 183 


80, 403, 932 


1887 


68, 223, 072 


47, 756, 918 


116, 979, 990 


1888 


72, 225, 497 


41, 331, 014 


113, 566, 511 


1889 


42, 136, 436 


41, 238, 151 


83, 374, 587 


1890 


42, 663, 095 


42, 644, 719 


85, 307, 814 


1891 


48, 485, 801 


71, 985, 985 


120, 471, 786 



The usual tables exhibiting, by weight and value, the deposits and 
purchases of gold and silver, at each of the mints and assay offices, will 
be found in the Appendix. 



COINAGE. 



The coinage executed during the fiscal year at the four coinage mints 
located at Philadelphia, San Francisco, Carson City, and New Orleans, 
aggregated 119,547,877 pieces, of the nominal value of $03,011,159.35, 
against 112,098,071 pieces, of the nominal value of $00,254,430.93, struck 
in the preceding fiscal year. 

The gold coins aggregated 1,414,154 pieces, of the value of $24, 172, ^ 
202.50, of which $22,002,880 were in double-eagles, $1,170,100 in eagles, 
$908,445 in half-eagles, and $30,777.50 in quarter-eagles. 

The bulk of the gold coinage was executed for depositors at the mints 
on the Pacific coast. 

The coinage of the three-dollar and one-dollar gold pieces, as well as 
the three-cent nickel piece, was discontinued by act of Congress ap- 
proved September 20, 1890, and no pieces of these denominations were 
struck during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1891. 

The silver coinage consisted of 30,232,802 silver dollars, $82,037.50 
in half-dollars, $195,118.75 in quarter-dollars, and $1,701,402.10 in 
dimes. 

The minor coinage, executed at the mint at Philadelphia, consisted 
of 13,338,275 nickel five-cent pieces, of the nominal value of $000,913.75, 
and 50,002,275 one-cent bronze pieces, of the nominal value of $500,022.75, 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Tlie coinage of the mints during the last fiscal year is recapitulated 
in the following table : 

Coinage, Fiscal Year 1891. 



Description. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


Gold 


1, 414, 154 
36, 232, 802 
18, 560, 371 
63, 340, 550 


$24, 172, 202. 50 
36, 232,802.00 
2,039,218.35 
1, 166, 936. 50 




Subsidiary silver coins 


Minor coins 




Total 

1 


119, 547, 877 


63,611, 159. 35 



In the Appendix will be found tables exhibiting, by institutions and 
by denominations of pieces, the coins struck at the mints during the 
fiscal year 1891, and also during the calendar year 1890. 

A table is also presented exhibiting the coinage of the mints each 
calendar year since the organization of the Mint in 1792 to the close of 
the fiscal year 1891. 

GOLD AND SILVER BARS MANUFACTURED. 

In addition to the coinage of the mints, gold and silver bars were 
manufactured during the fiscal year of the value of $39,603,199.42, as 
follows: 

Bars Manufactured, 1891. 



Description. 


Value. 


Gold 


$31,165,541.77 
8, 437. 657. 65 

39, 603, 199.42 


Silver 


Total : 





MEDALS AND DIES MANUFACTURED. 

During the last fiscal year 1,237 dies were prepared in the engraving 
department of the mint at Philadelphia, as exhibited in the following 
table: 

Dies Manufactured, 1891. 



Description. 


Number. 


For gold coinage 


93 


“ silver coinage 


625 


“ minor coinage 


486 




20 


“ Secretary Windom medal 


3 


“ Director of the Mint medal 


2 


“ Superintendent of the Mint mednl 


2 


“ Indian peace medal 


o 


“ annual assay medal 


2 


“ Railway Mail Sorvice medal 


2 


Total 


! 1,237 

1 



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report of the director of the mint. 7 



Tlie number of medals manufactured aggregated 3,293, distributed 
as follows: 



Medals Manufactured, 1891* 



Description. 


Number. 


Silver. : 


191 

1,502 

1,600 

3,293 


Bronze 


Total.,.. 



The detailed description of the medals manufactured during the year 
will be found in the Appendix to this report. 

The following table exhibits the number of medals and proof sets, as 
well as single-proof coins sold, dining the year: 

Medals and Proof Coins Sold, 1891. 



Description. 


Number. 


Value, 


Medals : 






Gold 


234 


$9, 321. 65 
1, 867.50 
696. 19 


Silver 


1,558 

823 


Bronze 


Total 


2, 615 


11, 885. 34 


Proof sets : 


Gold 


36 


1, 386. 00 
1, 499. 50 
152. 24 


Silver 


556 


Minor 


1,903 

2,495 


Total . . 


3, 037. 74 


Single proof pieces : 


Gold proof pieces 


42 


250.00 



The net profit realized from the sale of medals and proof coins dar- 
ing the year was $2,025.93, distributed during the four quarters of the 
year as follows : 



Net Profits on Medals, 1891. 



Quarters. 


Amount. 


Quarter ending— 


$298. 62 
263.58 
709.22 
754. 51 


December 31, 1890 


March 31, 1891 


June 30, 1891 


Total 


2,025.93 





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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF TIIE MINT. 



GOLD BARS EXCHANGED FOR GOLD COIN. 

During the fiscal year gold bars were exchanged for gold coin, at the 
mint at Philadelphia and the assay office at New York, of the value of 
$24,965,695.20, as exhibited in the following table : 



Fine Gold Bars Exchanged for Gold Coin, 1891. 



Months. 


Philadelphia. 


New York. 


Total. 


1890. 

July 


$30, 169. 07 


$7,407, 633.11 


$7, 437, 802. 18 


August 


60, 349. 90 


6, 416, 468. 97 


6, 476, 818. 87 


September 


65, 313. 00 


788, 997. 72 


854, 310. 72 


October 


70, 328. 56 


925, 331. 09 


995, 659. 65 


November 


75, 296. 64 


657, 680. 42 


732, 977. 06 


December 


40, 201. 20 


402, 584. 74 


442, 785. 94 


1891. 

January 


70, 379. 75 


574, 955. 70 


645, 335. 45 


February 


55, 256. 51 


3, 740, 954. 35 


3, 796, 210. 86 


March 


85,460.72 


1, 365, 712. 07 


1, 451, 172. 79 


April 


175, 372. 94 


552, 408. 38 


727, 781. 32 


May 


166, 074. 58 


530, 246. 19 


696, 320. 77 


June 


155, 861. 34 


552, 658. 25 


708, 519. 59 


Total 


1, 050, 064. 21 


23,915,630.99 


24, 965, 695. 20 



During the second session of the Fifty-first Congress, pursuant to 
recommendations contained in my last fiscal report, the following act, 
amendatory of the act of May 26, 1882, relative to the exchange of gold 
bars for United States gold coin, became a law March 3, 1891: 

Sec. 3. That an act to authorize the receipt of United States gold coin in exchange 
for gold bars, approved May twenty-six, eighteen hundred and eighty -two, he 
amended to read as follows : 

That the superintendents of the coinage mints and of the United States assay 
office at New York may, with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, hut 
not otherwise, receive United States gold coin from any holder thereof in sums of 
not less than five thousand dollars, and pay and deliver in exchange therefor gold bars 
in value equaling such coin so received : Provided , That the Secretary of the Treasury 
may impose for such exchange a charge which in his judgment shall equal the cost of 
manufacturing the bars. 

Sec. 4. That all acts or parts of acts inconsistent or in conflict with the provisions 
of this act are hereby repealed. 

In order that the change from the old law may be noted the act of 
May 26, 1882, is appended: 

That the superintendents of the coinage mints, and of the United States assay 
office at New York, are hereby authorized to receive United States gold coin from 
any holder thereof in sums not less than five thousand doUars, and to pay and 
deliver in exchange therefor gold bars in value equaling such coin so received. 

The act of May 26, 1882, was construed by the Attorney- General to 
be mandatory as to the exchange of gold bars for gold coin, and he 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



9 



further held that under its provisions no charge could be imposed for 
the exchange. 

The modified act provides that the Secretary of the Treasury may 
impose a charge for such exchange equal to the cost of manufacturing 
the bars ; and the exchange is to take place only with the approval of 
of the Secretary of the Treasury, thus making it discretionary. 

The day following the approval of the act (March 4, 1891) requests 
made at the United States assay office at New York for gold bars, for 
export, in exchange for gold coin were telegraphed, the Director. The 
superintendent was instructed to deliver gold bars in exchange for gold 
coin upon the payment of a bar charge of 4 cents per hundred dollars in 
value. 

Notwithstanding the charge imposed, exporters of gold continued to 
take large amounts of gold bars in exchange for gold coin, so that on 
March 23, 1891, the superintendent was instructed to decline to give 
gold bars in exchange for gold coin when required for shipment. 

Gold bars are furnished in exchange for gold coin, upon the payment 
of the bar charge, to jewelers and manufacturers for domestic use in the 
industrial arts, but since March 23 of the present year have not been 
furnished for export. 

As 1 have pointed out in prior reports, the movement of gold from the 
United States has been facilitated by the act of May 26, 1882. 

The shipment of gold, rather than the purchase of exchange, is, as a 
rule, decided on a very narrow margin of profit, and it would seem 
reasonable to infer that when the margin of profit between the actual 
shipment of specie and the purchase of exchange is small, shipments 
might be prevented if exporters were required to ship coin or to pay a 
premium for bars. 

The fact that exporters were willing and anxious to pay the charge of 
4 cents per hundred dollars in value, and even a higher rate, for gold 
bars in exchange for coin, is proof conclusive that United States bars of 
full weight and of recognized purity are a more profitable form of gold 
for shipment than coin. 

It has not been the policy of the Department to throw any obstacle in 
the way of the free movement of specie, but there is no good reason 
why the Government of the United States, reversing the policy of foreign 
banking houses under governmental control, should facilitate it. 

While the refusal to furnish bars for export has been powerless to stop 
the movement of gold this summer from this country, for the reason that 
specially powerful causes were operating (which are discussed elsewhere 
in this report), such refusal should have the effect to raise the u gold 
point” so as to render it unprofitable as a business transaction to ship 
gold from this country to London unless the price of sterling exchange 
approximates $4.89J, a rise of at least one-half a cent. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



WORK OF GOVERNMENT REFINERIES. 

The acid refineries of the coinage mints and of the assay office at 
New York operated during the last fiscal year on bullion contain- 
ing 9,070,490 standard ounces of gold and silver, of the value of 
$32,462,241.42, as exhibited in the following table: 

Product of Acid Refineries, 1891. 



Bullion. 


Standard ounces. 


Value. 


Gold 


1, 256, 090. 282 
7, 814, 399. 930 


$23, 369, 121. 51 
9,093, 119.91 


Silver 


Total 


9, 070,490. 212 


32,462, 241.42 





The weight and value of the precious metals treated in the refinery 
of each of the institutions is exhibited in the following table : . 

Refining (by Acids), 1891. 



Institutions. 


Gross ounces. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Total value. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Value. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Value. 


Philadelphia. . . 


891, 000. 14 


241, 605. 317 


$4, 494, 982. 64 


681, 059. 68 


$792,505.81 


$5,287,488.45 


San Francisco. . 


1, 677, 786. 14 


225, 655. 692 


4, 198, 245. 43 


1, 522, 273. 04 


1,771,372.26 


5, 969, 617. 69 


Carson 


2, 013, 792. 95 


97, 150. 630 


1, 807, 453. 58 


2, 134, 159. 75 


2, 483, 385.89 


4, 290, 839. 47 


New Orleans . . 


9, 970. 51 


5,577.473 


103, 766. 94 


4, 008. 80 


4,664.78 


108,431.72 


New York 


4,231,003.44 


686, 101. 170 


12, 764, 672. 92 


3,472,898.66 


4, 041, 191. 17 


16, 805, 864. 09 


Total 


8, 823, 553. 18 


1, 256, 090. 282 


23, 369, 121. 51 


7, 814, 399. 93 


j 9,093,119.91 


32,462, 241.42 



PURCHASES OF SILVER. 

From July 1 to August 13, 1890, the purchases of silver bullion were 
made under the provisions of the act of February 28, 1878. 

The amount purchased by the Treasury Department, on telegraphic 
offers of lots of over 10,000 ounces, was 2,431,827.18 standard ounces, 
costing $2,382,267.28. 

In addition to Department purchases, the purchases of silver at the 
mints in lots of less than 10,000 ounces, aggregated 663,512.57 standard 
ounces, costing $655,139.34, while the silver purchased in partings, bar 
charges, and fractions aggregated 12,859.72 standard ounces, costing 
$12,019.84. 

The total amount of silver purchased during the last fiscal year, under 
the act of 1878, was 3,108,199.47 standard ounces, costing $3,049,426.46. 

The average cost of silver purchased under the act of February 28, 
1878, during the first two months of the fiscal year, was $1.09 per fine 
ounce. 

The following table exhibits the quantity and cost of the silver pur- 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 11 

chased under the act of February 28 ? 1878, during the first two months 
of the fiscal year at each of the coinage mints: 

Deliveries on Purchases of Silver under Act of February 28, 1878, during 

Fiscal Year 1891. 



Mints. 


Standard ounces. 


Cost. 




1,768,110.47 

426,469.28 

688,821.09 

224,798.63 


$1, 722, 648. 60 

424. 062. 30 

681.576.31 
221, 139. 19 


San Francisco 


New Orleans 


Carson 


Total 


3,108, 199.47 


3,049,426.46 





Adding to this total the amount of silver on hand July 1, 4,415,244.66 
standard ounces, costing $4, 027, 833.80, makes the total amount of silver 
available for the coinage of silver dollars during the year, purchased 
under the act of February 28, 1878, 7,523,444.13 standard ounces, cost- 
ing $7,077,260.26. 

Bullion Delivered on Silver Purchases, Act of February 28, 1878. 



Mode of acquisition. ■ 


Standard ounces. 


Cost. 


Purchased by the Treasury Department (lots of over 10,000 ounces) . 


2,431,827. 18 
663, 512. 57 
12,859.72 


$2, 382, 267.28 
655, 139. 34 
12, 019.84 


Partings, bar charges, and fractions 


Total delivered on purchases 


3, 108,199.47 
4,415,244.60 


3,049,426.46 

4,027,833.80 


Balance July 1, 1890 


Available for coinage of silver dollars during fiscal year 1891.. 


7,523.444. 13 


7,077,260.26 



Of the bullion purchased under the act of February 28, 1878, 7,511,- 
218.49 standard ounces, costing $7,065,905.45, were used in the coinage 
of 8,740,327 standard silver dollars; 12,223.76 standard ounces, costing 
$11,353.07, were wasted by the operative officers and sold in sweeps, 
while the balance (consisting of fractions of less than an ounce at each 
of three coinage mints), 1.88 standard ounces, costing $1.74, was trans- 
ferred to the account of u silver purchases under act of July 14, 1890.” 
The total amount of silver bullion purchased under the act of Feb- 
ruary 28, 1878, from the commencement, March 1, 1878, to August 13, 
1890, was 323,635,576.19 standard ounces, costing $308,199,261.71, an 
average of $0.9523 per standard ounce, or $1,058 per fine ounce. 



SILVER PURCHASES UNDER ACT OF JULY 14, 1890. 



On August 13, 1890, the act of July 14, 1890, requiring the purchase 
monthly of 4,500,000 ounces of silver, went into effect. The amount 
purchased by the Treasury Department, on telegraphic offers of lots of 
over 10,000 ounces, to the close of the fiscal year, aggregated 47,710,254.77 



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12 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



standard ounces, costing $44,861,371.32. In addition to Department 
purchases, the purchases of silver at the mints in lots of less than 
10,000 ounces, aggregated 5,962,742.75 standard ounces, costing $5,625,- 
039.30, while the silver purchased in partings, bar charges, and fractions 
(including 1.88 standard ounces, costing $1.74, transferred from 1878 
bullion) aggregated 97,128.09 standard ounces, costing $91,087.82. 

The total amount purchased during the last fiscal year under the pro- 
visions of the act approved July 14 1890, was 53,770,125.61 standard 
ounces, costing $50,577,498.44. 

The average cost of the silver purchased under the act of July 14, 
1890, was $1,045 per fine ounce. 

The following table exhibits the quantity and cost of the silver pur- 
chased under the act of July 14, 1890, during the fiscal year, at each 
of the coinage mints : 

Deliveries on Purchases of Silver under Act of July 14, 1890, fiscal year 

1891. 



Mints. 


Standard ounces. 


Cost. 




40, 940, 666. 17 
7, 938, 845. 65 
3, 549, 085. 13 
1, 335, 528. 66 


$38, 457, 142. 83 
7, 520, 895. 10 
3, 350, 002. 58 
3,249,457. 93 


San Francisco - 


New Orleans 


Carson 


Total 


53, 770, 125. 61 


50, 577, 498. 44 





The following table is a recapitulation of the purchases, and mode of 
acquisition, under the act of July 14, 1890 : 

Bullion Delivered on Silver Purchases, Act of July 14, 1890. 



Mode of acquisition. 


Standard ounces. 


Cost. 


Purchased by the Treasury Department (lots of over 10,000 ounces). 
Purchased at mints (lots of less than 10,000 ounces) 


47, 710, 254. 77 
5, 962, 742. 75 

97, 128. 09 


$44,861,371. 32 
5, 625, 039. 30 

91, 087. 82 


Partings, bar charges, and fractions (including 1.88 standard ounces, 
costing $1.74, transferred from 1878 bullion) 


Total 


53, 770, 125. 61 


50,577,498.44 





The act of July 14, 1890, required “That the Secretary of the Treas- 
ury shall each month coin 2,000,000 ounces of the silver bullion pur- 
chased under the provisions of this act into standard silver dollars, 
until the first day of July, 1891, and after that time he shall coin of the 
silver bullion purchased under the provisions of this act as much 
as may be necessary to provide for the redemption of the Treas- 
ury notes herein provided for, and any gain or seignorage arising 
from such coinage shall be accounted for and paid into the Treasury.” 
In order to comply with the mandatory coinage of silver dollars re- 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



13 



quired by this act (2,000,000 ounces monthly, equivalent to 2,585,000 
silver dollars), there were coined from August 13, 1890, to June 30, 1891, 
from bullion purchased under the act of July 14, 1890, 27,292,475 silver 
dollars. 

The quantity of silver used in this coinage was 23,454,470.70 standard 
ounces, costing $22,747,800.42, while 27,272.98 standard ounces, costing 
$25,406.43, were wasted and sold in sweeps, leaving a balance of un- 
coined silver purchased under the act of July 14, 1890, on hand at the 
coinage mints June 30, 1891, of 30,288,381.93 standard ounces, costing 
$27,804,171.59, distributed as follows : 

Silver Bullion Purchased under Act of July 14 , 1890 , Uncoined June 30 , 1891 . 



Mints. 


Standard ounce®. 


Cost. 




28, 142,429.29 
1,475,445. 10 
325, 280. 55 
345,226. 99 


$25, 867, 660. 88 
1, 336, 159. 12 
290, 831. 02 
309, 520. 57 




New Orleans 


Carson 


Total 


30, 288, 381. 93 


27, 804, 171. 59 





The total amount of silver purchased, during the fiscal year, under 
both acts, February 28, 1878, and July 14, 1890, was 56,878,325.08 
standard ounces, costing $53,020,924.90, an average cost of $1.04f per 
fine ounce. 

The total coinage of silver dollars under the two acts was 
$30,032,802. 

In addition, 200,000 silver dollars were coined in the last month of 
the fiscal year from trade-dollar bullion. 

The total coinage of silver dollars, during the fiscal year, and the 
total seignorage on such coinage, is exhibited in the following table: 



Coinage of Silver Dollars, Fiscal Year 1891 . 



Act. 


Dollars coined. 


Seignorage. 




$8,740,327 
27, 292,475 
200, 000 


$1, 674, 421. 55 
4, 544, 614. 58 
2, 297. 29 


July 14 1890 


March 3 1891 


Total 


36, 232, 802 


6, 221, 333. 42 





Tlie total purchases of silver bullion under the provisions of the act 
of July 14, 1890, from August 13, 1890, to November 1, 1891, have ag- 
gregated 00,588,536 fine ounces, costing $68,026,565, an average for the 
whole period of $1.03 per fine ounce. The balance of silver bullion pur- 
chased under the act of July 14, 1890, on hand uncoined at this date, 
November 1, 1891, is 45,022,085 fine ounces, costing $45,420,512. 

The accompanying table exhibits the offers and purchases of silver 



Digitized by 



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14 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



during the fiscal year, under the acts of February 28, 1878, and July 
14, 1890: 



Silver Offered, Purchased, and Cost of Same, under the Act of February 

28, 1878. 



Pate. 



1890. 

July 3 

July 7 

July 10 

July 14 

July 17 

July 21 

July 24 

Local purchases 

Total for July 

August 4 

August 7 

August 11 

Local purchases 

Total for August 



Offers. 


Amount 

purchased. 


Cost. 


Fine ounces. 
,385, 000 

365. 000 

415. 000 

100. 000 
818, 000 

440. 000 

275. 000 


Fine ounces. 
200, 000. 00 
215, 000. 00 

405. 000. 00 
<*) • 

600. 000. 00 
270, 000. 00 

(*) 

347, 559. 58 


$209, 600. 00 
226, 225. 00 
432,062.25 


658, 600. 00 
297, 975. 00 


373, 720. 26 




2, 798, 000 


2,037,559,58 


2, 198,182. 51 


520.000 

535.000 

773. 000 


320.000. 00 

125.000. 00 
(*) 

261, 073. 70 


362, 375. 00 
140, 187. 50 


293, 438. 92 




1, 828, 000 


706, 073. 70 


796, 001. 42 



* All declined. 



Silver Offered, Purchased, and Cost of same, under Act of July 14, 1890. 



Date. | Offers. 


Amount 

purchased. 


Cost. 


1890. | Fine ounces. 

August 13 882,000 

August 15 704, 770 

August 18 590, 000 

August 20 1, 364, 000 

August 22 j . 1, 520, 000 

August 25 1, 020, 000 

August 27 1, 946, 000 

August 29 1, 453, 000 


Fine ounces. 

310. 000. 00 
417,770.00 

540. 000. 00 

516. 000. 00 

425. 000. 00 

450. 000. 00 

613. 000. 00 

358. 000. 00 


$350, 300. 00 
478, 957. 80 

640. 650. 00 

619. 530. 00 
507, 575. 00 
538, 365. 00 

730. 470. 00 
428, 445. 00 


Total 9, 479. 770 


3, 629, 770. 00 
175, 336. 06 


4, 294, 292. 80 
209, 732. 56 




Total for August 9, 479, 770 


3,805,106.06 


4, 504, 025. 36 


September 1 1, 215, 500 

September 3 ! 2, 003, 500 

September 5 ! 1, 077, 500 

September 8 804, 000 

September 10 640, 000 

September 12 431, 000 

September 15 500, 000 

September 17 j 519, 000 

September 19 ! 820, 000 

September 22 1, 035, 000 

September 24 j 338, 925 

September 26 ! 166, 762 


150, 500. 00 

300. 000. 00 

250. 000. 00 

255. 000. 00 

210. 000. 00 

321. 000. 00 

360. 000. 00 

326.000. 00 

470.000. 00 

250. 000. 00 

140. 000. 00 

105. 000. 00 


179, 808. 75 

358. 050. 00 

293. 087. 50 

298. 993. 00 

246. 750. 00 

371.428.50 
416, 830. 00 
380, 061. 25 
546, 988. 00 
289, 000. 00 

159. 100. 00 
118, 812. 50 


Total | 9,551,187 

Local purchases 


3, 137, 500. 00 
621, 728. 04 


3,658,909.50 
G61, 421. 96 




Total for September 1 9, 551, 187 


3,759, 228.04 


4, 320, 331. 46 


Digitized by 





REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



15 



Silver Offered, Purchased, and Cost of Same, etc. — Continued. 



Date. 


Offers. 


Amount 

purchased. 


Cost. 


1890. 


Fine ounces. 


Fine ounces. 




October 1 


375,000 


225,000.00 


$256,375.00 


October 3 


957,000 


510, 000. 00 


580, 238. 50 


October 6 


780, 000 


300,000.00 


336, 650. 00 


October 8 


733,000 


280,000.00 


312,722.50 


October 10 


843,000 


300,000.00 


332,400.00 


October 13 


871,000 


420,000.00 


465, 151. 00 


October 15 


436,000 


275,000.00 


301, 572. 50 


October 17 


424,000 


148, 000. 00 


163, 392. 00 


October 20 


1, 217,000 


647, 000. 00 


709, 267. 00 


October 22 


1, 274, 000 


515, 000. 00 


563,487.50 


October 24 


1, 050, 000 


200, 000. 00 


209, 960. 00 


Total 


8, 960, 000 


3, 820, 000. 00 


4, 231, 216. 00 






896, 711. 76 


987, 642. 98 


Total for Octobor 


8, 960,000 


4, 716, 711. 76 


5, 218, 864. 98 


November 3 


1,060,000 


515, 000. 00 


549, 205.00 


November 5 


1, 055, 000 


370, 000.00 


393, 186. 00 


November 7 


1, 045, 000 


420, 000.00 


430,290.00 


November 10 


600,000 


600,000.00 


620, 155. 00 


November 12 , 


862,000 


737,000.00 


763, 868. 50 


November 14 


750,000 


165, 000. 00 


170, 672. 50 


November 17 *. 


1, 475, 000 


745,000.00 


745, 990. 00 


November 19 


848,000 


500,000.00 


488, 565. 00 






447, 899. 44 


468, 943. 35 


Total for November 


1 

7, 695, 000 


4,499,899. 44 


4, 630, 875. 35 


December 1 


891, 000 


566, 000. 00 


606, 557. 50 


December 3 -• 


1, 283, 000 


321, 000.00 


339,442.50 


December 5 


1, 080, 000 


255, 000. 00 


266, 650. 00 


December 8 


1 , 120, 000 


685,000.00 


7Q7, 767. 50 


December 10 


803,000 


400,000.00 


415, 317. 50 


December 12 


1, 136, 000 


760, 000. 00 


801, 940. 00 


December 15 


918,000 


698,000.00 


758, 457. 00 


December 17 


657, 000 

' 


210,000.00 


226, 525. 50 


Local purchases 




624, 196. 07 


659, 974. 98 


Total for December 


7,888,000 


4, 519, 196. 07 


4, 782, 632. 48 


1891. 


! 






January 2 


932,000 


807,000.00 


848, 145. 00 


January 5 


1, 930, 500 


572,000.00 


598, 655.00 


January 7 . . . 


! 1, 356, 000 


628, 000. 00 


660, 238. 40 


January 9 


1, 026, 600 


754, 600. 00 


793,779.90 


January 12 


583,800 


283, 800.00 


304, 831. 35 


January 14 


! 918, 000 


455, 000.00 


482,470.00 


January 16 


j 749. 200 


318,000.00 


336. 827. 00 


January 19 


589,000 






January 21 


1,019,000 


326, 000.00 


343, 763. 50 


Local purchases 


l 


411, 421. 92 


433, 048. 50 


Total for January 


! 

9, 104, 100 


4, 555,821.92 


4, 801, 758. 65 


February 4 


1, 144, 500 


488, 000.00 


501, 074. 50 


February 6 


1, 057, 000 


507, 000.00 


517,972.10 


February 9 


788, 900 


60, 000.00 


60, 580. 00 


February 11 


823,500 


414, 000. 00 


421, 366. 50 


February 13 - 


955,500 


670, 500.00 


675, 841.00 



Digitized by 



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16 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Silver Offered, Purchased, and Cost of Same, etc.— Continued. 



Pate. 



1891. 

February 16 

February 18 

February 20 

February 25 

Local purchases 

Total for February 

March 2 

March 4 

March 6 

March 9 

March 11 

March 13 

March 16 

March 18 

March 20 

March 23 

March 25 

March 27 

Local purchases 

Total for March 

April 1 

April 3 

April 6 

April 8 

April 10 

April 13 

April 15 

April 17 

April 20 

April 22 

Local purchases 

Total for April 

May 1 

May 4 

May 6 

May 8 

May 11 

May 13 

May 15 

May 18 

May 20 

May 22 

May 25 

May 27 

May 29 

Local purchases 

Total for May 

June 1 

June 3 

June 5 

June 8 



Offers. 


Amount 

purchased. 


Cost. 


Fine ounces . 
568,500 
613,000 
1,058,000 
1, 173, 300 


Fine ounces. 
362, 500. 00 

124. 000. 00 

851.000. 00 

608. 000. 00 
466, 756. 34 


$362,165.00 
122,103.75 
843, 781. 63 
596,794.00 
468, 239. 56 




8, 182, 100 


4, 551,756. 34 


4. 569, 918.04 


748, 000 


105 000. 00 


103, 162. 50 


1, 089, 000 


745, 000. 00 


735, 225. 50 


1, 026, 000 


276, 000. 00 


271, 360. 00 


1 1, 189, 000 


570, 000. 00 


562, 162. 00 


777,000 


365, 000. 00 


361, 163. 00 


870, 500 


303, 000. 00 


301, 392. 50 


747,000 


377, 000. 00 


374, 886. 63 


662, 000 


412, 000. 00 


407, 832. 00 


1, 204, 000 


259, 000. 00 


257, 341. 00 


1, 204, 000 


526, 000. 00 


520, 578. 00 


533,000 


129, 000. 00 


126, 574. 00 


339, 000 


115, 000. 00 


112, 912. 50 




320, 560. 32 


317, 736. 75 


10, 388, 500 


4, 502, 560. 32 


4, 452, 326. 38 


1,291,500 


541, 000. 00 


534/217. 50 


915, 000 


370, 000. 00 


363, 780. 00 


940, 400 


393, 700. 00 


387, 051. 95 


2, 044, 600 


470, 000. 00 


460, 575. 00 


1, 605, 500 


355, 500. 00 


348, 312. 87 


960, 000 


242, 000. 00 


237, 139. 50 


1, 083, 000 


483, 000. 00 


472, 012. 50 


686, 000 


300, 000. 00 


292, 560. 00 


894, 000 


594, 000. 00 


578, 626. 00 


582, 000 


177, 000. 00 


170, 615. 60 


1 


599, 582. 19 


587,952.56 


11,002,000 


4, 525, 782. 19 


4, 432, 843. 48 


739,100 


175, 000. 00 


171, 440. 00 


889, 000 


326, 000. 00 


324, 659. 50 


958, 000 


468, 000. 00 


461, 297. 00 


905, 000 


414, 000. 00 


406, 888. 25 


839, 500 


593, 500. 00 


582, 834. 25 


434,000 


144, 000. 00 


141, 090. 00 


1 464, 800 


54, 800. 00 


53, 749.05 


! 940, 000 


415, 000. 00 


407, 416. 75 


746.000 


382, 000. 00 


373, 239. 00 


754, 000 


300, 000. 00 


291, 597. 50 


669, 500 


315, 500. 00 


306, 883. 50 


883, 000 


294, 000. 00 


286, 502. 50 


504,000 


120, 000. 00 


116, 400. 00 




502, 581. 13 


494, 368. 86 


9, 725. 900 


4, 504, 381. 13 


4, 418, 366. 16 


566, 000 


216, 000. 00 


209, 907. 00 


944,000 


320, 000. 00 


312, 820. 00 


1 881, 600 


434, 600. 00 


426, 174. 60 


! 887, 500 


532, 500.00 


521, 725. 82 




Digitized by 


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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



17 



% 

Silver Offered, Purchsed, and Costs of Same, etc. — C ontinued. 



■ 

Date. 


Offers. | 


Amount 

purchased. 


Cost. 


1891. 


Fine ounces. 


Fine ounces. 




June 10 


744, 000 


103,000.00 


$101, 071. 75 


June 12 


393,500 ' 


343, 500. 00 


336, 926. 50 


June 15 


1 459,000 , 


329, 000. 00 


323, 238.00 


June 17 


j 638,000 


538, 000. 00 


529, 220. 00 


June 19 


559,000 


559, 000. 00 


558, 651. 25 


June 22 


665,000 


315,000.00 


320, 807. 50 


June 24 


708,000 


383, 000. 00 


387, 047. 50 


Loeal purchases 




448,976.41 


441, 759. 88 


Total for June 


7, 445, 600 


4, 522, 576. 41 


4, 469, 349. 80 



COURSE OF SILVER. 



The fluctuations in the price of silver during the last fiscal year cov- 
ered a wide range, extending from $0,904 per fine ounce to $1.21 — a 
variation of nearly 25 cents — a fluctuation greater than in any pre- 
vious year. 

At the commencement of the fiscal year, July 1, 1890, silver was 
quoted in London at 47 T 9 W pence (the London quotation being per ounce 
British standard .925), equivalent, at the par of exchange, to $1,042 
per fine ounce; the New York price at the same date being $1.05. 

From this date, in anticipation of legislation by Congress which would 
increase the mandatory purchases of silver by this Government, the 
price of silver rose rapidly until, July 14, 1890, the date of the passage 
of the new silver law, the price had advanced in London to 49£ pence, 
and in New York to $1.08 per fine ounce. 

As the act was not to take effect until thirty days after its passage, 
the price fluctuated from 47f pence to 50£ pence ($1,107 per fine ounce), 
closing at the end of July at the latter figure. 

On August 1 the London price advanced to Sixpence ($1.12) the New 
York price the same day being $1.14J. 

On August 13, the date the new silver law took effect, the price had 
advanced in London to 51£ pence ($1,123) and in New York to $1.14 
per fine ounce. 

The highest price reached was, in New York, August 19, $1.21 per 
fine ounce (the highest point touched since 1878), and in London, Sep- 
tember 3, 54f pence ($1.19f). 

The price in New York did not vary materially from August 19 to 
September 3, when a decline commenced, extending, with some fluctua- 
tions, to the end of the calendar year, the price on December 31, 1890 ? 
being in London 48 pence ($1,052) and in New York $1,045. 

From the 1st of August to the middle of September the difference 
between the price of silver in New York and London was so great that 
bullion dealers were enabled to import silver from London at a profit. 



10285 M 2 



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18 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



During the mouth of January, 1891, the price of silver fluctuated 
between 484 and 46J pence. 

From this time forward the decline continued until April 24, when 
the lowest point was reached — 44 pence ($0,964) in London, the New 
York price the same date being $0,974* 

From this date the price gradually advanced, closing June 30, 1891, 
at 45f ($1,003), the New York price on the same date being $1,014* 

The average price of silver during the year was, in London, 47 t ^j 
pence, equivalent to $1.04J per fine ounce, and in New York $1,053; an 
average difference of nearly 1 cent. 

The highest, lowest, and average price of silver each month during 
the fiscal year, and also during the calendar year 1890, is shown in the 
following tables : 

Highest, Lowest, and Average Price of Silver Bullion, and Value of a 
Fine Ounce, each Month during the Fiscal Year 1891. 



Months. 


Highest. 


Lowest. 


Average 
price per 
ounce 
British 
standard, 
.925. 


Equivalent 
value of a fine 
ounce with 
exchange at 
par, $4.8665. 


Average 
monthly 
price at 
New York 
of exchange 
on London. 


Equivalent 
value of a fine 
ounce, based 
on average 
monthly price 
and average 
rate of ex- 
change. 


| Average 
j monthly 
! New York 
price of fine 
bar silver. 


1890. 


Pence. 


Pence. 


Pence. 










July 


50* i 


47 rs 


49. 201 


$1. 07854 


$4. 8852 


$1. 08367 


$1. 08942 


August 


54* 


50$ 


52. 707 


1. 15540 


4. 8718 


1.15643 


1. 16995 


September i 


54* 


50 


53. 123 


1. 16452 


4. 8504 


1.15946 


1.16560 


October 


51* 


48* 


49. 708 


1.08966 


4. 8599 


1. 08821 


1.10315 


November 


49* 


45 


47. 305 


I 1. 03698 


4. 8615 


1.03404 


1. 04022 


December 


49* 


47$ 


48. 135 


1. 05518 


4. 8388 


1. 04939 


1.05606 


1891. 














s * 


January 


48$ 


46* 


47. 9399 


1. 05085 


4. 8*37 


1.05034 


1. 055fr ; 


February 


46$ 


44* 


45. 547 


.99844 


4. 8772 


1.00202 


1. 00521 


March 


45* 


44* 


44. 928 


. 98487 


4. 8836 


.98854 


.99074 


April 


45 


43* 


44. 528 


.97610 


4. 8849 


. 99453 


. 98015 


May 


45* 


44$ 


44. 481 


.97507 


4. 8840 


. 97805 


. 98355 


June 


46 


44$ 


44.973 


. 98586 


4* 8861 


.98924 


.99557 


Average . . . 






47. 7146 




1. 04195 

l 


4.87059 


1. 047801 


1. 052935 



Digitized by Google 





19 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Highest, Lowest, and Average Price of Silver Bullion, and Value of a 
Fine Ounce, each month during the Calendar Year 1890. 



Months. 


Highest. 


Lowest. 


Average 
price per 
ounce, 
Britislv' 1 
standard 
.925. 


Equivalent 
value of » fine 
<odhce with 
exchange at 
par $4.8665. 


Average 
monthly 
price at 
New York 
of exchange 
on Lon- 
don. 


Equivalent 
value of a fine 
ounce, based 
on average 
monthly price 
and average 
rate of ex- 
change. 


Average 
monthly 
New York 
price of fine 
bar silver. 


1890. 

January 


Pence. 

44* 


Pence. 

44* 


Pence. 
44. 502 


$0. 97554 


$4. 8612 


$0.97448 


$0. 97510 


February 


m 


43* 


44.042 


.96545 


4. 8674 


.96582 


.96668 


March 


44* 


43* 


43.908 


.96251 


4.8550 


.96025 


.96149 


April 


48 


43* 


45. 451 


.99634 


4.8722 


.99747 


1. 00538 


May 


47* 


46 


46. 971 


1.02966 


4. 8596 


1. 02862 


1.04890 


June 


49 


46* 


47. 727 


1.04623 


4. 8737 


1.04780 


1. 05750 


July 


50* 


47A 


49. 201 


1.07854 


4. 8852 


1.08367 


1. 08942 


August 


54* 


502 


52. 707 


1.15540 


4.8718 


1. 15643 


1. 16995 


September 


54* 


50 


53. 123 


1. 16452 


4. 8504 


1. 15946 


1. 16560 


October 


51* 


48* 


49. 708 


1. 08966 


4. 8599 


1. 08821 


1. 10315 


November 


49* 


45 


47. 305 


1.03698 


4. 8615 


1. 03404 


1. 04022 


December 


49* 


47* 


48. 135* 


1.05518 


4. 8388 


1. 04939 


1.05606 


Average . . . 






47* 

1 


| 1.04633+ 

1 _ 1 


4. 8631— 


1.04547 


1. 05329— 



At the lowest price of silver during the fiscal year the value of the 
silver contained in a silver dollar was $0.75 ; at the highest price, $0.936 ; 
at the average price, $0,814. 

The price of silver at the date of the passage of the act of February 
28, 1878, which remonetized the silver dollar, and required the purchase 
and coinage monthly of not less than $2,000,000 nor more than $4,000,000 
worth of silver, was 55 pence, equivalent to $1,205 per fine ounce, at 
which price the commercial value of the silver in the silver dollar was 
$0.93£. 

From that date the dSfcline was, with some slight intermissions, uni- 
form until May 19, 1888, when silver reached its lowest price, 41f pence 
($0,912), at which price the commercial value of the silver in the dollar 
was $0,705. 

The commercial value of the pure silver contained in the silver dol- 
lar has been annually since 1873, at the average price of each year, as 
» follows : 

Bullion Value of the Silver Dollar, 1873-1890. 



Calendar years. 


Average 

price. 


Calendar year. 


Average 

price. 


1873 


$1,004 


1882 


$0 878 


1874 


.988 


1883 


.858 


1875 


.964 


1884 


. 861 


1876 


.894 


1885 


. 823 


1877 


.929 


1886 


! . 769 


1878 . 


.891 


I 1887 


.758 


I 879 


. 868 


1 1888 


.727 


1880 


.886 | 


i 1889 


.724 


1881 


.881 | 




.809 




j 1890 








20 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The following table exhibits the value of the pure silver in a silver 
dollar, reckoned at the commercial price of silver bullion from $0.90 to 
$1.2929 (parity of our coining rate) per fine ounce: 

Value of the Silver in a Silver Dollar, Reckoned at the Commercial Price 
of Silver Bullion, from 90 Cents to $1.2929 (parity) per Fine Ounce. 



Price of 
siver per 
fine ounce. 


Value of the 
pure silver 
in a silver 
dollar. 


Price of 
silver per 
fine ounce. 


Value of the 
pure silver 
in a silver 
dollar. 


Price of 
silver per * 
fine ounce. 


Value of the 
pure silver 
in a silver 
dollar. 


$0. 90 


$0. 696 


$1.04 


$0. 804 


$1.18 


$0. 913 


.91 


.704 


1. 05 


.812 


1.19 


.920 


.92 


.712 


1.06 


.820 


1.20 


.928 


.93 


.719 


1. 07 


.828 


1. 21 


.936 


.94 


.727 


1.08 


.835 


1.22 


.944 


.95 


.735 


1.09 


.843 


1.23 


.951 


.96 


.740 


1. 10 


.851 


1.24 


.959 


.97 


.750 


111 


.859 


1.25 


.967 


.98 


.758 


’ 1.12 


.866 


1.26 


.975 


.99 


.766 


1. 13 


.874 


1.27 


.982 


1.00 


.773 


1.14 


.882 


1.28 


.990 


1.01 


.781 


1. 15 


.889 


1.29 


.998 


1. 02 


.789 


1.16 


.897 


*1. 2929 


1.00 


1. 03 


.797 


1. 17 


.905 







♦Parity. 



The exports of silver from London to India during the first nine 
months of the present calendar year, that is, from January 1, 1891, to 
October 8, 1891, were £3,093, 62G, against £6,591,156 in the same pe- 
riod of 1890, a falling oft* of £3,497,530 ($17,020,730), over 50 per cent. 

The exports of silver from London to India, China, and the Straits 
each year since 1881 have been as follows : 

Exports of Silver to the East. 



Years. 


India. 


China. 


Straits. 


Total. 


1881 


$12, 375, 612 


$3, 898, 860 


$3, 577, 729 


$19, 852, 201 


1882 


18, 604, 945 


1, 584, 318 


7, 354, 255 


27, 543, 518 


1883 


18, 040, 140 


4,212,574 


11, 189, 631 


33,442,345 


3884 


26, 073, 909 


5, 018,714 


8,136,097 


39,228,720 


1885 - 


30, 913, 667 


3, 160, 315 


3, 108, 146 


37, 182, 128 


1886 


21,159, 591 


1, 769, 425 


2, 892, 064 


25, 821, 080 


1887 


19, 798, 328 


1, 427, 179 


2, 766,946 


23,992,453 


1888 


21, 162, 116 


1,153,002 


3, 219, 321 


25, 534,439 


1889 


28, 392, 786 


2,731,861 


8, 181, 141 


39, 305, 788 


1890 


35, 673, 177 


1,284,498 


4, 441, 197 


41,398,872 


1891 (first nine months) 


15, 032, 258 


670, 857 


6, 896, 526 


22, 599, 641 


Total 


1 247,226,529 


26, 911, 603 


61,763,053 


335, 901, 185 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



21 









The net imports of silver into British India, and the amount of coun- 
cil bills sold, during the last seventeen English official years (ended 
March 31, of each year), have been as follows: 



tears. 



1874- ’ 75 

1875- ’76 

1876- ’77 

1877- ’ 78 

1878- ’79 

1879- ’80 

1880- ’81 

1881-’8‘2 

1882- ’83 

1883- 84 



Net imports 
of silver. 


Amount of 
council bills 
sold. 


Years. 


Net imports 
of silver. 


Amount of 
i council hills 
sold. 


$22,580,560 


$52, 760, 715 


1884-’85 


35, 282, 125 


66,946,731 


7, 543, 075 


60,294,052 


1885-’86 


56, 500,065 


51, 212, 637 


35, 038, 800 


61, 784, 106 1 


1 1886-’87 


34, 844,140 


54, 296, 577 


71, 440, 220 


49, 319, 325 


! 1887-’88 


45, 307, 115 


73, 220, 790 


19, 320, 005 


67, 880, 692 


! 1888-’ 89 


45, 000, 525 


69,218, 337 


38, 299, 355 


74,271,598 


1 1889-’90 


43, 798, 500 


76, 890, 700 


18, 930, 685 


74,163,88 8 1 


i 1890-’91 


51, 926, 717 


77, 713, 304 


26, 181, 770 


89,604,086 1 

I 


| Total 


| 619,589,342 


1, 158, 811, 004 


36, 401, 420 


73, 584, 015 


Annual average 

1 


j 36, 446, 431 


68, 165, 353 


31, 194, 265 


85, 649, 451 



DISTRIBUTION OF SILVER DOLLARS. 

The number of silver dollars distributed from the mints during the 
last fiscal year was 13,208,794, an increase of 1,784,925 over the pre- 
ceding fiscal year. 

The distribution during the fiscal year, and the number of silver 
dollars in the mints at the commencement and close of the year, are ex- 
hibited in the following table: 



Period. 


Philadelphia. 


San Fran- 
cisco. 


New Orleans.] 


Carson. 


Total. 




39,448,758 

14,902,475 


i 28, 987, 782 
9, 350, 373 


8,459,974 
9, 870, 913 


1, 270, 233 
2, 109, 041 


78, 166, 747 
36, 232, 802 




Total 


54,351,233 

51,163,675 


i 38, 338, 155 
36,362,220 


18, 330, 887 
10, 884, 500 


3, 379, 274 
2, 880, 360 


114, 399, 549 
101, 290, 755 


In mints July 1, 1891 


Distributed from mints 


3,187,558 i 


1, 975, 935 


7,446,387 | 498,914 


13, 108, 794 





" CIRCULATION OF SILVER DOLLARS. 

The following comparative statement exhibits the total nutnber of 
silver dollars coined, the number held by the Treasury for the redemp- 
tion of certificates, the number held in excess of outstanding certifi- 
cates, and the number in circulation, on November 1, of each of the last 
six years: 

Coinage, Ownership, and Circulation of Silver Dollars. 



D;ito. 



Nov. 1, 1886 
Nov. 1, 1887 
Nov. 1, 1888 
Nov. 1, 1889 
Nov. 1, 1890 
Nov. 1, 1891 



Total coinage. 



244, 433, 386 
277, 110, 157 
309, 750, 890 
343, 638, 001 
380, 988, 466 
409, 475, 368 



In the Treasury. 



Held for pay- 
ment of certifi- 
cates out- 
standing. 



100, 306, 800 
160, 713, 957 
229, 783, 152 
277, 319, 944 
308, 206, 177 
321, 142, 642 



Held in excess ! 
of certificates | 
outstanding, j 



In circulation. 



82, 624, 431 
53, 461, 575 
20, 196, 288 

6, 219, 577 

7, 072, 725 
26, 197, 265 



61, 502, 155 
62, 934, 625 
59, 771, 450 
60, 098, 480 
65, 709, 564 
62, 135, 461 



22 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



SUBSIDIARY SILVER COINAGE. 

The subsidiary silver coinage, during the last fiscal year, aggregated 
18,560,371 pieces, of the nominal value of $2,039,218.35, consisting of 
$82,637.50 in half-dollars, $195,118.75 in quarter- dollars, and $1,761,462.10 
in dimes. 

Of this coinage, $1,211,400 were manufactured from trade-dollar 
bullion and $403.75 from purchased bullion. 

As the act of March 3, 1891, directed that the trade-dollar bullion 
should be coined into silver dollars, whereas the act of March 3, 1887, 
providing for the redemption of the trade dollars, had left the recoinage 
into standard dollars or subsidiary coin discretionary with 41ie Secre- 
tary, the use of this stock of silver for the coinage of subsidiary silver 
was discontinued. 

Worn and un current silver coin, mostly subsidiary pieces, were 
transferred from the Treasury to the mints for recoinage during the 
year of the nominal value of $910,046.69. 

Upon melting, these coins produced 692,575.67 ounces of standard 
silver, which would manufacture in subsidiary silver coins $861,680.41, 
showing a loss of $48,366.28, or about 5 per cent., of which sum 
$19,851.55 was reimbursed the Treasury from the appropriation for 
recoinage of uncurrent gold and silver coin, contained in the sundry 
civil bill, approved August 30, 1890, and the balance, $28,514.73, from 
the appropriation for recoinage contained in the act of March 3, 1891. 

The stock of silver used for subsidiary coinage during the fiscal year 
is exhibited in the following table: 

Silver for Subsidiary Coinage, 1891 . 





| Mint at Philadelphia. 


Mint at San Fran- 
cisco. , 


Total. 


Stock. 


. 












Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


Silver bullion on hand 














July 1 1890 


2, 302, 404. 45 


$2, 645, 942. 34 






2,302,404.45 


$2, 645, 942. 34 


Uncurrent coins trans- 






ferred from Treasury . . . 
Melted assay coins pur- 


522, 245. 57 


649, 761.21 

1 


170, 330. 10 


$211, 919. 20 


692, 575. 67 


861, 680. 41 


chased 


136. 58 


169. 93 






136. 58 


169. 93 








Total stock 


2, 824, 786. 60 


3.295.873.48 170.330.10 


211, 919. 20 


2, 995, 116. 70 


3, 507, 792. 68 


Used in coinage, fiscal 






year 1891 


1,468,691.70 


1, 734, 864. 67 


170, 330. 10 


211, 919. 20 


1, 639, 021. 80 


1, 946, 783. 87 


Trade-dollar bullion with- 


drawn from this account 

(act March 3, 1891) 

Silver bullion on hand 


1,326, 751.50 


1,524,828. 61 

! 






1, 326, 751. 50 


1, 524, 828. 61 


June 30 1891 


29, 343. 40' 


! 36.180.20 




29, 343. 40 


36, 180. 20 











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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 23 



The seigniorage on the subsidiary silver coinage during the year 
was $92,434.48, derived as follows: 



From trade dollars melted $92, 374. 42 

From silver bullion purchased 60. 06 



Total 



$92, 434. 48 



In my last annual report attention was directed to the large stock — 
$19,545,362.71 — of subsidiary silver coins in the Treasury of the United 
States, which, through abrasion or mutilation, were unfit for circula- 
tion, or else of denominations for which there was no popular demand, 
and a recommendation made that authority be given to recoin the same 
into such denominations of subsidiary coins as there was a demand for, 
and that the loss of metal incident to such recoinage be paid from the 
profits which had been made on silver coinage. 

Such a provision was inserted by the House of Representatives of 
the Fifty -first Congress in the sundry civil act for 1892, but the provi- 
sion was stricken out in the Senate, and in lieu thereof an appropriation 
of $150,000 was made for “ recoinage of the uncurrent fractional silver 
coins, abraded below the limit of tolerance, in the Treasury.” 

Under this liberal appropriation a large amount of uncurrent silver 
coins in the Treasury have been recoined into dimes and quarter-dol- 
lars, and such recoinage is still in progress. 

The nominal value of the silver coins transferred from the Treasury 
to the mints for recoiuage from July 1, 1890 to November 1, 1891, has 
been $4,277,917.74, upon which the loss of metal, representing the abra- 
sion from wear, has been $134,676.10 or an average of about 3 per cent. 
The actual coinage of the same into new silver coins has aggregated 
$3,226,414.60. 

It was estimated from previous recoinages that the loss would be 
about 5 per cent, and that the appropriation of $150,000 would enable 
the Department to recoin about $3,000,000. By careful and economical 
work the loss has been reduced considerably below this figure, and it 
is believed that the present appropriation will recoin nearly $5,000,000. 

The beneficial results of this appropriation are shown by the fact that 
the amount of subsidiary silver coin in the Treasury at the commence- 
ment of the last fiscal year, all of which was classed in Treasury state- 
ments as an u asset not available,” was $22,805,225, while the amount 
in the Treasury at the present date (November 1, 1891) is $15,196,379, 
a reduction of $7,608,846. 

In view of the importance of relieving the Treasury of this incubus of 
uncurrent coin, as well as to provide change money in an attractive and 
desirable form, I renew the recommendation made in my previous re- 
port that either a permanent annual appropriation for recoinages be 
made, or that authority be given to reimburse the Treasurer for the loss 
of metal incident to the recoinage of silver coins, from the large profits 
which have been made by the Government in the first instance in the 
manufacture and issue of such coins. It seems to me that instead of 



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Google 



24 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



depending upon the caprice of Congress for small annual appropriations 
for recoinage, that a permanent appropriation would be eminently 
proper and desirable. If, however, this does not meet with favor at the 
hands of Congress, I most urgently recommend an immediate appropria- 
tion of $100,000 for continuing the recoinage of uncurrent silver coins 
in the Treasury. 



TRADE-DOLLAR RECOINAGE. 

The total number of trade dollars redeemed under the provisions of 
the act of March 3, 1887, was 7,689,036, containing 6,687,690.61 standard 
ounces of silver, of the coining value in silver dollars of $7,782,040. 
From this there were coined up to the close of the fiscal year 1891, 
$2,889,011 in subsidiary silver coins, containing 2,322,042.62 standard 
ounces, costing $2,668,654.88. In addition there was transferred from 
trade dollars remelted at the San Francisco mint to silver dollar bullion, 
16.97 standard ounces, costing $19.51, making the total disposed of up 
to June 1, 1891, 2,322,059.59 standard ounces, costing $2,668,674.39, leav- 
ing on hand 4,365,631.12 standard ounces, costing $5,020,361.61. 

Of this amount there were stored, at the Philadelphia mint, 1,326,751.51 
standard ounces, costing $1,524,828.61, and, at the New Orleans, mint 
3,038,879.61 standard ounces, costing $3,495,533. 

The act of March 3, 1891, directed the u Secretary of the Treasury 
shall, as soon as practicable, coin into standard silver dollars the trade- 
dollar bullion and trade dollars now in the Treasury, the expense 
thereof to be charged to the silver profit fund.” 

As soon as the mandatory coinage of silver dollars required by the 
act of July 14, 1890, ceased by limitation of law, the conversion of the 
trade-dollar bullion into standard silver dollars was commenced at the 
mints at Philadelphia and New Orleans. 

The total number of silver dollars coined from trade-dollar bullion to 
November 1, 1891, has been $3,260,100, upon which seignorage has been 
$40,834.19. The coinage of trade-dollar bullion into standard silver dol- 
lars will be completed during the present calendar year. 



Digitized by vjOOQle 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



25 



The number of trade dollars redeemed under the act of March 3 ? 1887, 
the amount used in the subsidiary silver coinage to the close of the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1801, and the uncoined balance on hand are 
exhibited in the following table: 

TRADE DOLLARS RECOINED INTO SUBSIDIARY SILVER COIN. 





1887. 


1888. 


1889. 


Institutions. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


Trade dollars redeemed at 
Treasury and subtreas- 
uries and transferred to— 
Mint at Philadelphia. . 

Mint at San Francisco. 
Assay office at New 
York 


2, 475, 462. 00 
524, 636. 70 

1 2, 781,877. 21 


$2, 844, 813. 00 
603, 000. 00 

3, 200, 000. 00 


c 506,702.00 
l *1,626.90 
140, 383. 50 

257, 002. 40 


$582, 556. 00 
1, 871. 00 

161. 263. 00 

295. 533. 00 


5 




Total 


5, 781,975. 91 


6, 647, 813. 00 


905, 714. 80 


1,041,223. 00 


' 


Recoined — 

Mint at Philadelphia. . 
Mint at San Francisco . 
Mint at New Orleans . . 


206, 563. 75 
40, 187. 50 

1 


237, 386. 32 
46, 190. 18 

1 1 


338,378.75 
409, 848. 45 


388, 897. 88 
471, 007. 25 


131, 200. 37 
214, 967. 28 


$150, 787. 90 
247, 046. 06 


Transferred to silver - 
dollar bullion ac- 
count, San Francisco 










16.97 


19. 51 


Total recoined 


246, 751. 25 


283, 576. 50j 


1 748,227.20 


859,905. 13 


346, 184. 62 


397, 853. 47 




1890. 

1 




1891. 


| _ 


Total 





Institutions. 


j Standard 
ounces. 


Cost. 


Standard | 
ounces. 


Cost. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


Trade dollars redeemed at | 
Treasury and subtreas- 
uries and transferred to — 
Mint at Philadelphia. . 
Mint at San Francisco . 
Assay office at New 
York 






1 

: 





2, 983, 790. 90 
665, 020. 20 

*3, 038, 879. 61 


$3, 429, 240. 00 
764, 263. 00 

3,495,533.00 


Total 










6, 687, 690. 71 


7, 689, 036. 00 


Recoined — 

Mint at Philadelphia. . 
Mint at San Francisco . 
Mint at New Orleans . . 
Transferred to silver- 
dollar bullion ac- 
count, San Francisco 


7, 233. 75 


$8, 313. 71 


973, 662. 77 


$1,119,025.58 


1, 657, 039. 39 
665, 003. 23 

16.97 


1,904,411.39 
764, 243.49 

19. 51 


Total recoined 


7, 233. 75 


8, 313.71 


973, 662. 77 


1,119, 025. 58 


! 2,322,059.59 


2, 668, 674. 39 


Uncoined June 1, 1891 — 
Mint at Philadelphia. . 
Mint at New Orleans . 

Total 


• 


1, 326,751. 51 
3, 038, 879. 61 

4, 365, 631. 12 


1,524,828.61 
3,495, 533.00 

j 5,020,361.61 



* Transferred from mint at New Orleans. t Transferred to the mint at New Orleans. 



Digitized by Google 



26 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The following table exhibits the amount of trade-dollar bullion 
coined, the cost of same, number of dollars coined therefrom and the 
seigniorage thereon, under act of March 3, 1891, at the mints at Phil- 
adelphia and New Orleans, to November 1, 1891 : 



Coinage of Silver Dollars from Trade-Dollar Bullion. 
MINT AT PHILADELPHIA. 



Months. 


Coined. 


Sold in sweeps. 


Total employment. 


Dollars 

coined. 


Seignior- 

age. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


1891. 

June 


















July 

August 

September . . . 
October 


300, 781. 25 
429, 687. 50 
171, 960. 94 
214, 843. 75 


$345, 686. 33 
493, 837. 61 
197, 633. 81 
246, 918. 80 






300, 781. 25 
429, 687. 50 
171,960.94 
214, 843. 75 


$345, 686. 33 
493, 837. 61 
197, 633. 81 
246,918.80 

i 


$350,000 

500. 000 
200, 100 

250.000 


$4, 313. 67 
6, 162. 39 

2. 466. 19 

3. 081. 20 


Total .... 


1,117,273.44 

1 


1,284,076.55 

! 


11,117,273.44 

l * 


1,284,076.55 


1, 300, 100 


16, 023. 45 



MINT AT NEW ORLEANS. 



1891. 


171. 875. 00 
429, 687. 50 
481. 250. 00 

343.750.00 
429,687.50 


$197,702.71 
494, 256. 77 
553, 567. 58 
395, 405. 42 
494, 256. 78 






171,875. 00 
429, 687. 50 
481, 250. 00 
344,320. 19 
429, 687. 50 


$197,702.71 

494. 256. 77 
553, 567. 58 
396, 061.29 

494.256.78 


$200, 000 

500.000 

560.000 

400. 000 

500.000 


$2, 297. 29 
5, 743. 23 
6, 432. 42 
4, 594. 58 
5, 743. 22 














September . . . 
October 


570. 19 


$655. 87 








Total.... 


1,856,250.00 


2,135,189.26 


570.19 


655. 87 


1,856,820.19 


2,135,845.13 


2, 160,000 


24, 810. 74 


Grand to- 


















tal 


2,973,523.44 

1 


3,429,265.81 


570. 19 


655. 87 


2,974,093.63 


3,419,921.68 


3, 460, 100 


40, 834’ 19 



SEIGNIORAGE ON SILVER. 

The balance of silver profits on hand, at the four coinage mints, at 
the commencement of the fiscal year, was $302,659.51. 

The seigniorage on the coinage of silver dollars during the fiscal year 
aggregated $6,221,333.42, and on subsidiary silver coinage $92,434.48, 
a total of $6,313,767.90. 

From the gross seigniorage there was paid for the transportation of 
silver coins the sum of $52,904.16, and for reimbursement of wastage 
and loss on sale of sweeps $6,530.90, a total of $59,435.06, leaving as 
bhe net seigniorage for the year the sum of $6,254,332.84. 

The total amount of seigniorage covered into the Treasury during 
bhe fiscal year aggregated $6,404,677, leaving on hand in the coinage 
mints at the close of the year the sum of $152,315.35. 

The net profit on the coinage of silver during the thirteen years 
3nded June 30, 1891, including the balance in the coinage mints on 
July 1, 1878, has aggregated $71,952,390.25. 

In the Appendix will be found the usual tables showing the seignior- 
ige on the coinage of silver dollars and subsidiary silver separately, 
ind the distribution of the profits. 

Digitized by Google 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 27 

A table will also be found exhibiting the expenditures from silver 
profits on account of distribution of silver coins. 

MINOR COINAGE. 

During the fiscal year 63,340,550 minor coin pieces were struck at the 
mint at Philadelphia, of the face value of $1,166,936.50, as follows : 



Minor Coinage, 1891. 



Denominations. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


Five-cent nickel 


13. 338. 275 

50.002.275 


$666, 913. 75 
500, 022. 75 


One-cent bronze 


Total 


63, 340, 550 


1,166,936.50 





The amount and cost of blanks purchased for minor coinage during 
the year was as follows : 



Blanks purchased. 


Pounds 

avoirdupois. 


Cost. 


One-cent bronze blanks 


339, 500 
143,000 


$67, 696. 30 
46, 444. 20 


Five-cent nickel blanks 


Total 


482, 500 


114, 140. 50 





The demand for minor coins has been pressing, taxing to the utmost 
the capacity of the mint at Philadelphia, but there has been no delay 
upon the part of the mint in supplying such coins. The blanks used 
in the manufacture of these pieces were purchased, ready for striking, 
under contract, the rate paid being $0.1995 per pound for the one-cent 
blanks and $0.3194 for the five-cent nickels. 

'No recoinage of minor coinage metal was executed during the year. 

The accompanying statement shows the balance of coinage metal on 
hand at the commencement of the year, the amount transferred, and 
the cost of metal necessary to recoin the same and the loss in melting. 

Minor Coinage Metal. 



Character. 


Amount. 


Balance on hand July 1, 1890 


$28, 012. 46 


Transferred to mint by Treasurer of United States 


34, 049. 00 


In order to make the proper alloy for the recoinage of the 1-cent 
nickel coins into 5-cent nickel coins, it was necessary to add new 
nickel, costing 


334. 21 


In order to make the proper alloy for the recoinage of the old copper 
cents into bronze 1-cent coins, it was necessary to add tin and zinc, 
costing 


10. 12 


In order to recoin the 3-cent nickel coins into 5-cent nickel coins it 
was necessary to add metal of the same alloy, costing 


255. 76 


Making the total amount available for recoinage 


62,661.55 


Deduct from same wastage for the year 


1, 186. 71 


Leaving the net amount available, at the close of the year, June 30, 
1891, for recoinage, to be 


61, 474. $4 



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28 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The following table exhibits the distribution of minor coins during 
the tiscal year 1891 : 

Minor Coins Distributed from the Mint at Philadelphia during the Fiscal 

Year 1891. 



State or Territory. 


5-cent 

nickel. 


1-cent 

bronze. 


State or Territory. 


5-cent 
| nickel. 


1-cent 

bronze. 


Alabama 


$9, 375 


$1,890 1 


Nebraska ' 


$14, 395 


$5, 819 


Arizona 


540 


60 | 


New Hampshire 


4, 525 


3, 785 


Arkansas 


2,120 


240 j 


1 New Jersey 


22, 290 


16,345 


California 


10, 440 
1 5,345 


760 




940 




Colorado 


1, 040 


1 New York 


82, 195 


105, 630 


Connecticut 


1 14,450 


8, 980 


I North Carolina 


11,445 


4, 760 


Delaware 


; 4,450 


2, 940 


1 North Dakota 


650 


650 


District of Columbia 


| 100 


340 


j Ohio 


1 43, 610 


30, 460 


Florida 


4, 560 


1,410 


| Oklahoma Territory 


1 220 


20 


Georgia 


( 17,975 


7, 325 


Oregon 


4, 810 


100 


Idaho 


140 






83, 680 
9, 300 


48,060 

9,450 


Illinois 


- 86, 125 


! 

68, 950 


Rhode Island 


Indian Territory 


| 220 




South Carolina 


11,100 

1,985 


3, 090 
1,045 


Indiana 


; 18, 685 


12, 165 


South Dakota 


Iowa 


; 31, 700 


14, 050 


Tennessee 


14,920 


4,740 


Kansas 


: 10,725 


7,870 


Texas 


l 36,965 


1,300 


Kentucky 


I 29,755 


9, 630 


Utah Territory 


1,960 


25 


Louisiana 


j 13, 180 


80 


Vermont 


1 3, 720 


2, 800 


Maine 


4, 340 


4, 030 


Virginia 


21,320 


7, 400 


Maryland 


! 11,875 


5, 745 


Washington 


8, 405 


395 


Massachusetts 


37, 590 


36, 020 


West Virginia 


4,610 


2, 100 


Michigan 


; 25, 480 


17, 310 


Wisconsin 


| 22, 175 


17, 290 


Minnesota 


. 10, 875 

2, 970 


12, 325 


Wyoming 


500 




Mississippi 


345 


Total 


$789,150 


$188, 874 


Missouri 

Montana 


1 22, 475 

4,940 


9, 000 
1,105 







The several types and denominations of minor coins issued by the Phil - 
adelphia Mint since its establishment, the amount remelted by the mint, 
and the amount apparently outstanding June 30, 1891, are set forth in 
the following table : 



Denominations. 


Coined. 


Remelted. 


Outstanding 
June 30, 1891. 


Copper cents 


$1,562,887.44 


$376, 300. 44 


$1, 186, 587. 10 




39,926.11 






Copper nickel cents * 


2, 007, 720. 00 


763, 782. 78 


1, 243, 937. 22 


Bronze cents 


6, 172, 897. 17 


39, 871. 73 


6, 133, 085. 44 


Bronze 2-cent pieces 


912, 020. 00 


318, 926. 82 


593, 093. 18 


Nickel 3-cent pieces 


905, 768. 52 


230, 684. 74 


675, 083. 78 


Nickel 5-cent pieces 


11, 545, 224. 55 

t 


111,145.60 


11, 430, 483. 95 


Total 


23, 146, 443. 79 


1,840,712.11 


21, 262, 270. 67 



* There is no record of the melting of any old copper half-cents, but it is believed that few, if any, are 
in circulation. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 

The amounts specifically appropriated by Congress for the support 
of the mints and assay offices of the United States for the fiscal year 

Digitized by VjOvJVIC 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 29 

ended June 30 ? 1891, aggregated $1,030,351.50, against $1,094,050 ap- 
propriated for the preceding fiscal year. 

From specific appropriations there was expended $1,022,806.28, leav- 
ing unexpended $7,545.22. 

In addition, there was expended at the four coinage mints from the 
general appropriations contained in the act of February 28, 1878, and 
July 14, 1890, the sum of $312,191.72. 

There was also expended from the latter appropriations at the Treas- 
ury Department the sum of $912 for cablegrams from London giving 
the daily price of silver. 

The total expenditures, therefore, for the mint service for the last, 
fiscal year aggregated $1,335,910. 

The appropriations and expenditures for the mint service, exclusive 
of the amount paid by the Treasury Department for cablegrams, are 
exhibited in the following table: 

Appropriations and Expenditures, 1891 . 

APPROPRIATIONS. 



Institutions. 


Salaries. , 


Wages. 


Contingent.! 


| Appropria- 
tion for the 
coinage of 
' the standard 
silver dollar, 
act Febru- 
ary 28, 1878. 


Appropria- 
tion for the 
coinage of 
silver bullion, 
act July 14, 
1890. 


Total. 


MINTS. 


$41, 550. 00 
41,100.00 
' 19,550.00 
! 31,950.00 

1 


$293, 000. 00 
170, 000. 00 
30, 000. 00 


$80,000.00 
40,000.00 
12,500,00 
35, 000. 00 j 






$414,550.00 
251, 100. 00 
| 72, 050. 00 

140, 950. 00 


Philadelphia 


{ 


San Francisco 




Carson . . f. 


74, 000. 00 




New Orleans 






ASSAY OFFICES. 


| 39, 250. 00 
1 10,950.00 
1 7,700.00 

! 3,200.00 


25,000.00 
13, 750. 00 
12, 701. 50 


10, 000. 00 
6, 000.00 
5, 000. 00 
7, 500. 00 
2, 000. 00 
2, 400. 00 






74, 250, 00 

30. 700. 00 
25, 401.50 

10. 700. 00 
4, 750. 00 
5, 900. 00 


New York T 


1 ■ ■ 


Denver 


! ' 


Helena 


i 




Bois6 City 


| 2, 750. 00 

| 3, 500. 00 




f 




Charlotte 




i 




Ct T.A111Q 








Ot* lauiio 


| 211, 500. 00 

i 


618, 451. 50 


200, 400. 00 




1, 030, 351. 50 


Total 


i 



EXPENDITURES. 



MINTS. 

Philadelphia 

San Francisco 

Carson 

New Orleans 

ASSAY OFFICES. 

New York 

Denver 

Helena 

Bois6 City 

Charlotte 

St. Louis 

Total 



41, 364. 56 


292, 987. 02 


79,790,27 , 


11,682.84 


I 

126, 519.20 


552, 343. 89 


41, 100. 00 


169,987.88 


39, 430. 39 


204.60 


48, 862.44 


299, 585. 31 


29, 550. 00 


30, 000. 00 


11,905.28 , 


33, 103. 76 


30, 397. 65 


134, 956. 69 


31, 908. 77 


73, 993. 21 


33,840.55 ! 


39,609.70 


! 21, 811. 53 


201, 163. 76 


39, 250. 00 


24, 636. 75 


10, 000. 00 1 






73, 886. 75 


10, 950. 00 


13, 706. 25 


2, 431.48 






27, 087. 73 


7, 571. 75 


12, 587. 00 


4, 478. 07 






24, 636. 82 


3,200.00 




7, 487. 90 






10, 687. 90 


2, 750. 00 




1, 999. 76 




4, 749. 76 


3, 500. 00 




2, 399. 39 


........ 

1 


! 5, 899. 39 






i 


211,145. 08 


617, 898. 11 


193, 763. 09 


84,600.90 


227, 590. 82 


1, 334, 998. 00 



Digitized by V joogte 





30 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The unexpended balances of appropriations for the fiscal year 1891 
are shown in detail in the following table: 

Unexpended Balances of Appropriations, Fiscal Year 1891. 



Institutions. 


Salaries. 


Wages. 


Contingent 

expenses. 


Total. 


MINTS. 


$185.44 


$12.98 
12. 12 


$209. 73 
569. 61 
594. 72 
If 159. 45 


$408. 15 
581.73 
594.72 
1.207.47 

363.25 
3, 612. 27 
764.68 
12. 10 
.24 
.61 








41.23 


6. 79 

363.25 
43. 75 
114. 50 


ASSAY OFFICES. 






3, 568. 52 
521.93 
12.10 
.24 
.61 


Helena 


128.25 


Charlotte ^ 








Total j 






354. 92 


553. 39 


6, 636. 91 


7, 545.22 



The expenses of the office of the Director of the Mint, embracing the 
salaries of the Director and clerical force, the examination of mints and 
assay offices, the purehese of books and periodicals, the maintenance 
of the laboratory, the expenses of collecting and compiling the statistics 
of the precious metals, and all incidental and contingent expenses, 
aggregated $34,636.90, leaving unexpended of appropriations for these 
purposes $2,073.10. 

The appropriations and expenditures were as follows: 

Appropriations and Expenses of the Office of the Director of the Mint 
for the Fiscal Year 1891. 



Purposes for which appropriated. 


Appropriated. 


Expended. 


Unexpended. 




$28, 960. 00 
2, 500. 00 
4, 000.00 

750.00 

500.00 


$28, 164.08 
1,560. 18 
3, 696. 95 
723.00 
492. 69 


$795.92 
939, 82 
303, 05 
27.00 
7. 31 


Examination of mints 

Mining statistics 


Laboratory 


Books, pamphlets, and incidental expenses 


Total 


36, 710. 00 


34, 636. 90 


2, 073. 10 





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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 31 

The appropriations made for the support of the mints and assay 
offices for the fiscal year to end June 30, 1892, are as follows: 

Appropriations for Mints and Assay Offices, 1892. 



Institutions. 


Salaries. 


Wages of 
workmen. 


Contingent 

expenses. 


Total. 


MINTS. 










Philadelphia 


$41, 550. 00 


$293, 000.00 


$80, 000. 00 


$414, 550. 00 


San Francisco 


41, 100. 00 


170, 000. 00 


40, 000. 00 


251, 100. 00 


Carson 


29, 550. 00 | 


| 60, 000. 00 


25, 000. 00 


! 114, 550. 00 


New Orleans 


31,950.00 


74, 000. 00 


35, 000. 00 


140, 950. 00 


ASSAY OFFICES. 










New York 


39, 250. 00 


30, 000. 00 


10, 000. 00 


79, 250. 00 


Denver 


10, 950. 00 


13, 750. 00 


6, 000.00 


30, 700. 00 


Helena 


7, 700. 00 


12, 700. 00 


5, 000.00 


25, 400. 00 


Boise City 


3, 200.00 




9,000,00 


12, 200. 00 


Charlotte 


2, 750. 00 




2, 500. 00 


5, 250, 00 


St. TiOiiin 


* 3,500.00 




2,400.00 


5, 900.00 






Total 


211, 500. 00 


653, 450. 00 


214, 900. 00 


1, 079. 850. 00 



On the 28th of September, 1891, I had the honor to submit for your 
consideration estimates of appropriations required for the support of the 
mint service for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1893. 

These estimates, including the usual appropriation for “ freight on 
bullion and coin,” aggregated $1,126,711.50, against appropriations for 
the same purposes for the current fiscal year aggregating $1,126,761.50, 
a slight reduction. 



EARNINGS AND EXPENSES OF THE REFINERIES OF THE COINAGE 
MINTS AND ASSAY OFFICE AT NEW YORK. 



The amount collected from depositors during the fiscal year 1891 at 
the coinage mints and assay office at New York, as charges for parting 
and refining bullion, was $199,946.79. 

The law requires that the charges collected of depositors shall be 
used to defray the expenses of the operations of the refinery. 

The total amount expended was $215,767.63. 

There was realized, however, during the year, from the sale of by-prod- 
ucts from the refinery (blue vitriol and spent acid) the sum of $19,480.42, 
a legitimate gain to the refinery, which gains prior to the fiscal year 
1885 were used in offsetting payments for acids. 

Since that date, under a decision of the First Comptroller, the pro- 
ceeds of the sale of blue vitriol and spent acids, the by-products of the 
acid refinery, have not been available for reducing the expenses of the 
refinery, but are covered into the Treasury as a miscellaneous receipt. 

Deducting from the gross expenditures the amount realized from the 
sale of these by-products, the net expenditures for parting and refining 
bullion were $196 ? 287,14, or $3,659.65 less than the charges collected. 



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32 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



In my fiscal report attention was directed to the advisability of 
changing existing law, as construed by the accounting officers of the 
Department, so as to permit the use of moneys arising from the sale of 
refinery by-products in reducing the expenses of the refineries. 

The purpose of the law was to make the refineries self-supporting, 
and this purpose is partly defeated by diverting legitimate gains, which 
in any metallurgical establishment would be used to offset losses and 
expenses. 

Under a separate heading in this report I invite attention to the 
propriety and advisability of changing the law in this respect. 

The total receipts for parting and refining bullion since July 1, 1870, 
the date at which the refineries were made self-supporting, have ex- 
ceeded the gross expenditures for the same period by the sum of 
$114,727.02, the latter amount standing to the credit of the appropria- 
tion for parting and refining bullion on July 1, 1891. 

The receipts and expenses of the refineries for the fiscal year 1891 
are exhibited in the following table: 

Charges Collected and Expenditures for Parting and Refining Bullion, 

1891. 



Institutions. 


Charges 

collected. 


Gross ex- 
penditures. 


Net expend- 
itures. 




$18, 510. 74 
49,492.63 
37, 960. 28 
772. 17 
93, 210. 97 


$19, 419. 83 
64, 987. 08 
35, 735. 92 
312. 70 
95, 312. 10 


$19, 419. 83 
63,916. 40 
31, 661. 92 
312. 63 
80, 976. 3G 




Mint at Carson 


Mint at New Orleans 


Assay office at New York 

Total 


199, 946. 79 


215, 767. 63 


196, 287. 14 





EARNINGS AND EXPENSES OF THE MINTS AND ASSAY OFFICES. 



The total earnings of the mints and assay offices during the last fiscal 
year aggregated $7,050,529.02, of which $0,221,333.42 arose from seign- 
iorage on the coinage of silver dollars, $92,434.48 from seigniorage on 
subsidiary silver coins, and $1,050,144.31 from seigniorage on minor 
coinage. 

The remainder of the earnings were derived from charges collected 
from deposits, profits on the sale of medals and proof coins, from sur- 
plus bullion returned by the operative officers and recovered from the 
deposit melting room, and from the sale of old material and by-prod- 
ucts. 

The total expenditures and losses of all kinds, including the entire 
expenses for the support of the mints and assay offices and the acid re- 
fineries, the wastage of the operative departments and losses on the 
sale of sweeps, the expenses of distributing silver dollars, subsidiary 
silver, and minor coins, aggregated $1,661,139.83, leaving a net profit} 
of earnings over expenditures for the fiscal year of $5,989,389.79. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



33 



In the appendix will be found the usual table exhibiting in detail the 
earnings and expenditures under each classification and at each insti- 
tution. 

CLASSIFIED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES. 

The following table exhibits the expenditures for the different classes 
of supplies (as well as for salaries and wages) at the institutions com- 
prising the mint service during the fiscal year 1891, the expenses of 
the acid refineries being separated from the ordinary expenses of the 
mints. 

Statement of Expenditures for Supplies at the Mints and Assay Offices 
of the United States for the Fiscal Year ending June 30 , 1891 . 



Supplies. 



Acids 

Advertising 

Adjusting and repair of balances. . 

Assayer’s materials 

Barrels and tierces 

Belting 

Brick, fire 

Bullion balance 

Charcoal 

Chemicals 

Coal 

Coke 

Copper 

Crucibles 

Dry goods 

Electric motor 

Flags 

Fluxes 

Freight and drayage 

Gas and electric lighting 

Gas furnaces 

Gloves and gauntlets 

Hardware 

Ice 

Iron and steel 

Labor and repairs 

Loss on sale of sweeps *. . . 

Lumber 

Machinery and appliances 

Metal work and castings 

Oils 

Rent 

Salt 

Sewing 

Stationery, printing, and binding . . 

Steam 

Sundries 

telegraphing and telephone service 
Tools 



)rdinary. 


Refinery. 


Total. 


$1,965.09 


$47, 272. 86 


$49, 237. 95 


348.33 




348.33 


233. 00 




233. 00 


1, 239. 83 




1, 239. 83 




1,037.45 


1, 037. 45 


1,016. 55 


36.87 


1,053. 42 




228.52 


228. 52 


1, 800. 00 




1,800. 00 


5, 650. 66 


2. 195. 16 


7,845.82 


5, 242. 38 


435. 40 


5, 677. 78 


17,858.49 


8,129.86 


25, 988. 35 


5, 568. 62 


279. 53 


5, 848. 15 


27, 841. 00 


16, 258. 91 


44, 099. 91 


6,654.86 


3, 440. 48 


10, 035. 34 


2,111.18 


1, 726. 94 


3, 838. 12 


865. 15 




865. 15 


10.00 




10.00 


137. 80 


2, 736. 66 


2, 874. 46 


3, 484. 79 


2, 503. 25 


5, 988. 14 


15, 508. 18 


2, 006. 12 


17, 513. 30 


112.50 


347. 50 


460.00 


10, 026. 53 


834. 90 


10, 861. 43 


4, 555. 66 


1, 689. 31 


6, 244. 97 


3, 246. 92 


325. 53 


3, 572. 45 


1, 733. 61 


127. 14 


1, 860. 75 


10, 745. 20 


3, 953. 29 


14, 698. 49 


534. 26 


674.96 


1,209.22 


3, 438. 22 


946. 52 


4, 384. 74 


21, 729. 91 


755. 01 


22, 484. 92 


4, 781. 39 


1, 409. 68 


6, 191. 07 


1,836.29 


352. 35 


2, 188. 64 


480.00 




480.00 


7. 05 


681.71 


688. 76 


2, 573. 37 


985.65 


3, 559. 02 


2,110. 69 




2, 110. 69 


862r69 


6,815. 51 


7, 678. 20 


42, 666. 92 


1, 917. 94 


44, 584. 86 


441.42 




441.42 


329.81 




329. 81 



10285 M 3 



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34 REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

Statement of Expenditures for Supplies at the Mints and Assay Offices 
of the United States, etc.— Continued. 



Supplies. 


Ordinary. 


Refinery. 


Total. 




$4, 313. 34 
1,460. 31 
15, 117. 14 


$700. 25 
60.00 
976. 68 
3, 784. 61 
855. 02 


$5,013.50 
1, 520. 31 
16, 093. 82 
3, 784. 61 
1, 091. 66 






Zinc i 




236.64 


Total 


230, 875. 78 
211,145.08 
802, 977. 14 


116, 480. 67 


347, 356. 45 
211, 145. 08 
992, 264. 10 


Salaries 


Wages of workmen 


99, 286. 96 


Agffrecate — 


1, 334, 998. 00 j 215, 767. 63 


1, 550, 765. 63 


OO o v * * * 



MOVEMENT OF GOLD FROM THE UNITED STATES. 

In the report of this Bureau for the fiscal year 1889, attention was 
directed to the heavy export of gold from the United States, commenc- 
ing in May, 1888, and continuing, with some interruption, to the end of 
July, 1889, aggregating $61,435,989. 

In considering this movement it was mentioned that in addition to 
the bars consigned directly to France, the bulk of the other gold ship- 
ments were intended for the Bank of France, and the causes which 
seemed to operate in producing this drain of gold were enumerated, 
among others the large expenditures by Americans at the Paris Expo- 
sition. 

In the summer of 1890 a movement of gold from this country occurred, 
which, while by no means as serious in amount as its predecessor, was 
somewhat remarkable as a monetary transaction, considering the low 
rate of sight sterling exchange which obtained during the period. 

This movement aggregated in a period of less than two months the 
sum of $15,672,982. 

In February of the present year another movement of gold to Europe 
commenced which did not cease until near the close of July, exceeding 
in amount the exports of the fiscal year 1889, and causing by far the 
most serious loss of gold which this country has sustained for many 
years. 

The total amount exported from the port of New York was 
$70,223,494.31, 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 35 

The following table, which has been prepared with great care and 
research by the superintendent of the assay office at £Tew York, ex- 
hibits the dates and value of the shipments, the names of the shippers, 
and the destination of the specie, and prevailing rates of sterling ex- 
change: 

Gold Bars and Gold Coin Shipped from the Port of New York to Europe 
from February 13 to July 24, 1891. 



Dato. 


Name of shipper. 


Value. 


Rate of 
exchange. 


Destination. 


Fob. 13 


UNITED STATES ASSAY OFFICE BARS. 

Lazard Frdres 


$1,027, 378.57 


$4. 88-4. 88* 


Germany. 


13 


Heidelbach, Ickelheimer &. Co 


762, 709. 13 


4. 88-4. 884 


Do. 


20 


do 


601,830. 72 


4.87-4. 87* 


Do. 


27 


do 


602, 611.48 


4. 87-4. 874 


Do. 


Mar. 5 


do 


601,622. 41 


4.884 


Do. 


Mar. 21 


Total United States Assay Office bars . . . 
UNITED 8TATES COIN. 

Lazard Frfcres 


3, 596, 152. 31 
500, 005. 00 


4. 88} 


France. 




do 


1, 000, 000. 00 


4.88} 


Germany. 


21 


Heidelbach, Ickelheimer & Co 


1,278, 000.00 


4.88} 


Do. 


27 


Lazard Fr^res 


700, 000. 00 


4. 884-4. 88} 


France. 


Apr. 4 


do 


800, 000. 00 


4. 884 


Do. 


4 


Ladenburg, Thalman & Co 


500, 000.00 


4.884 


Germany. 


8 


Heidelbach, Ickelheimer & Co 


1, 001,500.00 


4. 884-4. 88} 


Do. 


8 


A. Belmont & Co 


300, 000. 00 


4. 884-4. 88} 


Do. 


11 


Ladenburg, Thalman & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4. 884 


Do. 


11 


Heidelbach, Ickelheimer & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4. 884 


Do. 


11 


L. Von Hoffmann & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4. 884 


Do. 


11 


Kidder, Peabody & Co 


250, 000. 00 


4. 884 


Do. 


11 


Lazard Frdres 


500, 000. 00 


4. 884 


Do. 


11 

18 


Ladenburg, Thalman & Co 


500, 000. 00 
500, 000.00 


4. 884 
4.88} 


France. 

Germany. 


18 


L. Von Hoffman & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4.884 


Do. 


18 


Heidelbach, Ickelheimer & Co 


100, 000. 00 
1, 000, 000. 00 


4.884 

4.88} 


Do. 


18 


Kidder, Peabody & Co 


Do. 


18 


Lazard Fr£res 


1, 150, 000. 00 


4. 884 


France. 


25 


L. Von Hoffman & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4. 884 


Germany. 


25 


A. Belmont & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4. 884 


Do. 


25 


Kidder, Peabody & Co 


500, 000.00 


4. 884 


Do. 


28 


Lazard Fr&res 


1, 800, 000. 00 


4.89 


Franco. 


29 




700, 000. 00 


4.89 


England. 


29 


L. Von Hofftnan & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4.89 


Do. 


29 


Kessler & Co 


250, 000. 00 


4.89 


Do. 


29 


Heidelbach Ickelheimer & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4.89 


Do. 


29 


A. Belmont & Co 


500, 000.00 


4.89 


Do. 


May 2 


Lazard Frdres 


500, 000.00 


4.88} 


Do. 


2 




1, 400, 000. 00 


! 4.88} 


France. 


6 


Baring, Magoun & Co 


1, 000, 000. 00 


4. 88}-4. 89 


England 


6 


A. Belmont A Co 


500, 000.00 


4. 88}-4. 89 


Do. 


6 


Heidelbach, Ickelheimer & Co 


500, 000.00 


4. 88}-4. 89 


Do. 


6 


Lazard Frdres 


650, 000. 00 


4. 88}-4. 89 


Do. 


6 


L. Von Hoffman & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4. 88}-4. 89 


Do. 


9 


Baring, Magoun & Co 


600, 000.00 


4.88} 


Do. 


9 


A. Belmont & Co 


500, 000,00 


4.884 


Do. 








Digitized by vjOO^LC 




36 EEPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

Gold Bars and Gold Coin Shipped from the Port of New York to Europe, 

etc. — Continued. 



Date. 


Name of shipper. 


Value. 


Rate of 
exchange. 


Destination. 


May 9 


UNITED STATES COIN— COnti IHlhd. 

L. Yon Hoffman & Co 


$500, 000. 00 


4.88* 


Do. 


9 


Kuhn, Loeb & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4.88* 


Do. 


9 


Lazard Frdres 


500, 000. 00 


4.88* 


Do. 


9 


do 


1, 150, 000. 00 


4. 88* 


France. 


12 


Heidelbaek, Iekelheimer &. Co 


500, 000. 00 


4.88* 


England. 


13 


do 


500, 000. 00 


4. 88*-4. 88* 


Do. 


13 


Lazard Fr&res 


750, 000. 00 


4. 88*-4. 88* 


Do. 


14 


do 


750, 000. 00 


4.88 


Do. 


14 


L. Yon Hoffman & Co 


1, 000, 000. 00 


4.88 


Do. 


14 


Ladenburg, Thalmann &. Co 


500,000.00 


4.88 


Do. 


16 


do 


500, 000. 00 


4.88* 


Do. 


16 


Lazard Frdres 


1, 250, 000. 00 


4. 88* 


Do. 


16 


L. Yon Hoffmann & Co 


1, 000, 000. 00 


4.88* 


Do. 


16 


Heidelbaek, Iekelheimer & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4.88* 


Do. 


16 


do , 


500,000.00 


5.88* 


France. 


20 


Baring, Magoun & Co 


1, 000, 000. 00 


4.87* 


England. 


20 


Lazard Fr^res 


750, 000. 00 


4. 87* 


Do. 


20 


Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4.87* 


Do. 


20 


Brown Bros. & Co 


750, 000. 00 


4. 87* 


Do. 


20 


L. Yon Hoffman & Co 


250, 000. 00 


4.87* 


Do. 


20 


Heidelbach, Iekelheimer & Co 


970, 000. 00 


4. 87* 


Do. 


23 


Baring, Magoun & Co 


1. 000, 000. 00 


4. 87* 


Do. 


23 


L. You Hoffman & Co 


300, 000. 00 


4. 87* 


Do. 


23 


Lazard Frdres 


1, 000, 000. 00 


4.87* 


Do. 


23 


Heidelbach, Iekelheimer & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4. 87* 


France. 


27 


Kuhn, Loeb & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4.88* 


England. 


27 


Baring, Magoun & 


250, 000. 00 


4. 88* 


Do. 


27 


Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4.88* 


Do. 


27 


L. Von Hoffmann & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4.88* 


Do. 


30 




350, 000. 00 


4. 88*-4. 88* 


Do. 


30 


Lazard Frdres 


750, 000. 00 


4. 88*-4. 88* 


Do. 


30 


do 


1, 250, 000. 00 


4. 88J-4- 882 


France. 


30 


Heidelbach, Iekelheimer & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4. 88*-4. 88* 


Do. 


June 2 


Lazard Frdres 


1, 000, 000. 00 


4.88* 


England. 


3 


do 


750, 000. 00 


4. 88*-4. 88* 


Do. 


3 


Baring, Magoun & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4. 88*-4. 88* 


Do. 


3 


L. Yon Hoffman & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4. 88*-4. 88* 


Do. 


3 


Heidelbach, Iekelheimer & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4. 88* -4. 88* 


Do. 


4 


do 


600, 000. 00 


4.88* 


Do. 


4 


Kuhn, Loeb & Co 


500, 000.00 


4.88* 


Do. 


6 


do 


500, 000. 00 


4. 87* 


Do. 


6 


Lazard Frdres 


500, 000.00 


4.87* 


Do. 


6 


do 


1, 000, 000. 00 


4.87* 


France. 


9 


A. Belmont & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4. 87* 


England. 


19 


Lazard Frdres 


1, 250, 000. 00 


4. 88*-4. 88* 


Do. 


19 


do 


1, 250, 000. 00 


4. 88*-4. 88* 


France. 


22 




600, 000. 00 


4. 88*-4. 88* 


England. 


24 


Heidelbach, Iekelheimer & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4.88* 


Germany. 


26 


do 


500, 000. 00 


4. 88*-4. 88* 


Do. 


26 


L. Von Hoffmann & Co 


• 750, 000. 00 


4. 88*-4. 88* 


Do. 


26 


Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co 


750, 000. 00 


4. 88J-4. 88* 


Do. 


26 


Lazard Fr&res 


1, 000, 000. 00 


4. 88*-4. 88* 


England. 








■Digitized by 


Google 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 37 

Gold Bars and Gold Coin Shipped from the Port of New York to Europe, 

etc. — Continued. 



Date. 


Name of shipper. 


Value. 


Date of 
exchange. 


j Destination. 




united states coin — continued. 






i 


June 26 


Lazard Fr6res 


$1, 250, 000. 00 


4. 88*-4. 88| 


France. 


30 




500, 000. 00 


4. 88$ 


England. 


30 


Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co 


500, 000. 00 


4.88* 


Germany. 


July 1 


Heidelbach, Ickelliimer & Co 


200,000.00 


4. 87*-4. 87* 


Do. 


3 


Lazard Fr&res 


500, 000. 00 


4. 87*-4. 87* 


England. 


3 


do 


1, 100, 000. 00 


4. 87*-4. 87* 


France. 


6 


do 


500, 000.00 


4. 87 -4. 87* 


England. 


17 


Heidelbach, Ickelheimer & Co 


300, 000. 00 


4. 86*-4. 86* 


Germany. 


20 


Lazard FrOres 


600, 000.00 


4. 861-4. 87 


England. 


24 


do 


500, 000. 00 


4. 861 


Do. 


24 


do 


1, 000, 000. 00 


4.86J 


France. 




Total coin 


66, 399, 505. 00 








Add United States Assay Otlice bars 


3, 596, 152. 31 








Total 


69, 995, 657. 31 






May — 


Lazard FrAres (Selby bars) 


227, 837. 00 








Grand total 


70, 223, 494. 31 







An examination of the above table discloses the very singular fact 
that of this large amount all but $9,300,000 was shipped when the rate 
of sterling exchange was below the point (about $4.88G) at which gold 
shipments can be made without loss. The movement, therefore, must 
have been artificially stimulated by banks and bankers in Europe pay- 
ing a premium on gold or making discounts to bill-drawers for cash 
remittances. 

This was the result of a condition of affairs very unusual in the mer- 
cantile world. 



Ordinarily, large banking houses in New York, at certain seasons, can 
draw on correspondents in the financial centers of Europe sight and 
time exchange to a large amount in advance of expected commercial 
bills drawn against shipments of produce, etc. 

The heavy losses incurred by European capitalists in South American 
countries, and the resulting financial disturbances and uneasiness pro- 
duced thereby, not only greatly restricted this credit, but led to a 
continuous pressure, more or less strong, for gold to strengthen the 
reserves of the banks in England, France, and Germany. 

For reasons connected with loan difficulties, Kussia at the same time 
withdrew from the depositories of Western Europe large quantities of 
gold, thus adding greatly to the drain and increasing the pressure for 
the import of gold from the United States, this country being the only 
outside source from which gold in large amounts could be readily 
drawn. 

The usual encouragement to the import of gold by the banks of 
Paris and Berlin in giving credit fo importers for money on the day of 
shipment from New York, was, of course, in operation. 

Digitized by VjOOQLC 




38 



REPORT OE THE DIRECTOR OE THE MINT. 



It is a well-known fact that the Bank of England paid a premium for 
American gold coin, and increased that premium from time to time as 
the financial crisis grew more threatening. 

The rate of interest for money being above the normal price in Europe, 
investments in American securities were discouraged. Indeed, large 
amounts of the latter were returned in exchange for gold, some holders 
being doubtless influenced by the fear of the advent of a silver stand- 
ard here. 

The amount of silver exported was also greatly reduced by the in- 
creased monthly purchases by this Government, and gold took its place. 

The relative amounts of exports and imports of produce and mer- 
chandise generally were such as to make our indebtedness larger than 
usual. 

The gold carried out of the country to meet the expenses, by sea and 
land, of Americans spending their summers abroad, must have nearly 
if not quite equaled the year of the Paris Exposition, when such ex- 
penditures were estimated at over $92,000,000. 

The balance of trade, for these reasons, being against us, and the 
pressing need for gold in London, Paris, and Berlin, account very largely 
for the very heavy exports of gold during these five months. 

Desultory quantities of gold were returned to this country from 
Europe in the month of July of the present year, but by September the 
return movement was well under way and has continued to the present 
time. The following table exhibits the imjiortations of gold (over half 
our own coin returned), from July 1 to November 1, 1891: 

Imports of Gold Coin and Gold Bullion at New York from July 1 , 1891 , to 

October 31 , 1891 . 



Month. 



July. 



September . 



October . 



Total . 



Country. 



lUnited States v . . 

i coin. | Foreign coin, 



England . . 
France — 
Germany . 



I $267,658.00 

120,625.00 

I 306,590.00 

England | ! 339,825.00 

France $2, 614, 200. 00 j 935,980.00 

Germany j 976, 225. 00 j 1, 032, 745. 00 

England 4, 144, 417. 00 j 3, 108, 991. 00 

France 3,323,430.00 j 439,243.00 

Germany 5ll, 200. 00 I 243, 325. 00 



Foreign bul- 
lion. 



$13. 00 



11,569,472.00 , 6,794,982.00 



48, 665. 00 
866, 445. 00 
|*1, 549, 081. 00 
34,572.00 



2,498, 776.00 



During the same period there were received at the port of New York the following 
amounts of gold coin and bullion from Mexico, Central and South America, and the 
West Indies, viz : 



Total. 



939,886.00 187,341.00 



Grand total 112, 509, 358. 00 6, 982, 323. 00 



333, 316. 00 



2, 832, 092. 00 



Total. 



$267, 658. 00 

120. 625. 00 
306, 603. 00 

339. 825. 00 

3. 550. 180. 00 

2.057.635.00 
8, 119, 853. 00 

5. 311. 754. 00 

789. 097. 00 



20, 863, 230. 00 



1,460,543.00 



22, 323, 773. 00 



♦Includes $20,967.07 United States assay office bars. 



Digitized by tjOOQle 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



39 



With the return of confidence in Europe, investors and others there 
have bought heavily in American securities, and these investments, 
together with the large exports of breadstuffs and other materials from 
the United States this fall and winter, must necessitate additional 
shipments of gold to this country, and it is believed that the movement 
of specie to our shores now in progress will continue, with some inter- 
ruptions, for some months yet and in increasing amounts. 

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF THE PRECIOUS METALS. 

Gold . — The value of the gold bullion imported into the United States 
during the fiscal year 1891 — all foreign gold — was $2,105,034, of which 
$1,073,243 came from Mexico, $399,472 from British Columbia, $324,010 
from Colombia, $145,995 from Great Britain, and the remainder from 
countries of Central America and South America. 

Gold was contained in imported silver-lead ores of the value of 
$68,742. 

Foreign gold ores, of the invoiced value of $214,803, were imported 
into the United States for reduction, all except a small amount coming 
from Mexico. 

Foreign gold coins were imported of the value of $13,303,387, of which 
$5,851,526 were from Australia, $2,447,901 from Great Britain, 
$2,375,133 from Cuba, $1,410,385 from Germany, $472,850 from France, 
$328,208 from San Domingo, $154,592 from Mexico, and the remainder 
fr om various countries. 

United States gold coins were returned to this country during the 
year of the value of $2,824,146. 

The total imports of gold into the United States during the fiscal 
year may be summed up as follows : 

Gold Imports, 1891. 



Items. 


Amount. 




$2, 105, 034 
13, 303, 387 
214, 803 
68, 742 

15,691,966 

2,824,146 

18, 516,112 






Foreign gold in silver-lead ores 


Total foreign 


United States coin 


Total imports 





The exports of domestic gold bullion aggregated $17,234,651, of which 
$15,118,702 were United States bars and $2,115,949 private bars. 

Of the gold bullion exported, $12,901,547 were consigned to Great 
Britain, $4,100,877 to Germany, $209,010 to France, $13,217 to Hong- 
kong, and $10,000 to British West Indies. 

In addition $11,770 in foreign gold bullion was reexported to Great 



Digitized by CaOOQle 





40 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Britain, while $34,542 represented the invoiced value of the exports of 
domestic gold ores, and $209 of the gold in foreign ores exported. 

United States gold coin was exported of the value of $67,704,900, of 
which $35,285,950 was consigned to Great Britain, $14,450,005 to France, 
$12,429,500 to Germany, and the remainder to various countries. 

Foreign gold coins were reexported during the year of the value of 
$1,411,333, of which $1,027,196 went to Cuba, $327,889 to Venezuela, 
and the remainder to various countries. 

The movement of gold from the United States during the last fiscal 
year may be summed up as follows: 

Gold ExroitTS, 1891. 



Items. 


Amount. 




$15,118, 702 
2, 115, 949 






67, 704, 900 
65, 475 
34, 542 










Total domestic 




85, 039, 568 


Foreign bullion re-exported 

Foreign coin re-exported 

Foreign ores re-exported 


$11,770 

1,411,333 

209 






1,423, 312 






Total irnld exnorts. 




86, 462, 880 





From the above tables it will be seen that there was a net loss of gold 
to the United States, by excess of exports over imports, ot $67,946,768. 

Silver . — The commercial value of the foreign silver bullion imported 
into the United States during the fiscal year was, as registered at the 
custom-houses, $6,321,977, of which $4,848,771 consisted of unparted 
bars from Mexico, $838,992 commercial bars from Germany, $388,304 
commercial bars from England, and the remainder small lots from 
various countries of this continent. 

In addition to the imports of silver bars, silver ores were imported 
into the United States for reduction, of the invoiced value of $8,953,608. 

As usual, the bulk of these ores, $8,679,845 came from Mexico, $254,- 
270 from the British Possessions in North America, and the remainder 
in small lots from other countries of this continent. 

The silver ores imported into the United States were what is known 
as silver-lead ores, containing in addition to the silver contents large 
quantities of metallic lead and some gold and copper. 

The following valuable table, compiled by the Chief of the Bureau of 
Statistics from special statements furnished by collectors of customs, 
exhibits approximately the quantity and value of the different metals 
contained in these ores. 



Digitized by Google 





REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



41 



Silver Ore Imported into the United States during the Fiscal Year 
1891. with the Quantities and Values of Gold, Silver, Lead, and Copper 

CONTAINED, IN THE ORE, AS FAR AS COULD BE ASCERTAINED. 



Customs districts. 



Arizona 

Champlain, N. Y 

Corpus Christi, Tex 

Montana and Idaho 

New Orleans, La 

New York, N. Y 

North and South Dakota. . . 

Oswegatchie, N. Y 

Paso del Norte, Tex. and 
N. Mex. 

Puget Sound, Wash 

Saluria, Tex 

San Diego, Cal 

San Francisco, Cal 

Superior, Mich 

Total 



Total ore. 



Pounds. 



15, 520, 656 



34, 486, 045 
397, 323 
637, 720 
1 , 212,000 
85 

391, 578 
167, 019, 844 

62,000 
19, 359, 558 



239, 086, 809 



Value. 

$1,527, 018 
*800 
1, 424, 089 
40, 294 
48, 453 
*358, 457 
*50 
217, 893 
5, 349, 671 

2,395 
713,644 
4, 250 
511, 070 
1,260 



Gold. 



Ounces. Value, 



1, 905 



1,778 



10, 199, 344 



3, 683 



$36, 226 



32, 516 



Silver. 



Ounces. 



1, 443, 792 



1,050 
595, 775 



346 



Value. 



t $1,462, 434 



1,285, 756 
35, 0T4 
48,453 



217, 893 
4, 169, 502 

1,050 
516, 246 
4, 205 
511, 070 
353 



68, 742 I 2, 040, 963 I 



8, 252, 036 



Customs districts. 



Lead. 



Pounds. 



Arizona 

Corpus Christi, Tex ! 

Montana and Idaho 

Paso del Norte, Tex., and N. Mex. 

Puget Sound, Wash 

Saluria, Tex 

San Diego, Cal 

Superior, Mich 



1, 430, 295 
■ 693, 262 

11,988 
34, 134, 681 
24,542 
3, 962, 066 
744 
32, 225 



V alue. 



$50,060 
24,264 
420 
1, 194, 714 
859 
138, 672 
26 

1,128 



Total 1 40,289,803 



1, 410, 143 



Copper. 

Pounds. I Value. 



242,667 



64, 270 
161, 447 



468,384 



$12, 181 



4, 800 
8, 148 



25, 129 



* No details obtainable. t Includes value of gold and silver. 

Note.— The data in this table have been obtained from special reports by the collectors of customs, 
and although necessarily incomplete in some details are believed to be valuable. This table will not 
in the total value of ore compare with the stated publications which Latter represent only the value 
of free silver ore and exclude dutiable contents, such as copper, and, since October 5, 1890, lead. The 
value of the lead is estimated at 3J cents per pound, the average value of bai lead at New York less 1 
cent. 



From the above table it will be seen that the approximate value of 
the silver contained in these ores was $8,252,036 and of the gold 
$68,742, while they contained in addition 40,289,803 pounds of metallic 
lead, of the invoiced value of $1,410,143 (against $905,470 in the pre- 
vious fiscal year), and 468,384 pounds of copper, of the value of $25,129. 

Foreign silver coins were imported of the value of $11,379,663, of 
which $8,187,918 were Mexican dollars and the remainder principally 
South American coins. 

Our own silver coins, principally subsidiary pieces, were returned 
during the year of the value of $325,240. 



Digitized by Google 




42 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The imports of silver into the United States during the fiscal year 
may be summed up as follows: 

Imports of Silver, 1891. 



It {*111 8. 


Amount. 


Foreign bullion (commercial valnel 


$6, 321,977 
8, 252,036 
11,379, 663 




Foreign silver coin 


Total foreign 


25, 953, 676 
325,240 


United States silver coin 


Total silver imports 


26,278,916 





Domestic silver bars of the value of $13,797,391 were exported from 
the United States during the fiscal year, of which $12,722,398 were con- 
signed to England. 

In addition to exports of domestic silver bullion, copper matte was 
exported from the port of Baltimore to England, for reduction, con- 
taining silver of the commercial value of $838,388. 

The following letter from the collector of the port of Baltimore in re- 
gard to the character of this matte and where it was produced will be 
found interesting: 



Custom-house, Baltimore, Md., 
Collector’s Office, September 8 , 1891. 



Sir: In reply to your letter of the 4tli instant requesting me to furnish you a state- 
ment of the amount of gold and silver contained in silver ores, copper matte, and ar- 
gentiferous matte exported from the port of Baltimore, during the fiscal year ended 
June 30, 1891, I inclose a transcript, showing the amount in copper, silver, and gold. 

I would say that the “ Baltimore Copper Smelting and Rolling Company,” the prin- 
cipal exporters of copper ores, now make no distinction between copper matte and 
silver-copper matte, it being all exported from this custom-house as silver-copper 
matte, at the uniform basis of 60.5 per cent pure copper, 35 ounces pure silver, and 
0.14 of pure gold. 

The locality from which the ore is received is the Anaconda mine, State of Montana. 

Very respectfully, 



H. Lingenfelder, 

Special Deputy Collector . 



The Director of the Mint, 

Washington , D . C, 



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REPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OP THE MINT. 



43 



Transcript of the Exportation of Copper Matte and Silver-Copper Matte 
From the Port of Baltimore during the Fiscal Year ended June 30, 1891. 



[Silver-copper matte calculated on a basis of 60$ per cent fine copper, 35 ounces pure silver, and 0.14 

ounce gold per ton.] 



Year. 


Pounds. 


Tons. 


Pounds fine 
copper. 


Ounces of 
silver. 


Ounces 
of gold. 


1890. 

Jnly 


3, 662, 915 


1, 831. 46 


2, 216,066 


64, 101. 1 


256.40 


August 


3, 823, 297 


1, 911.64 


2, 313.080 


66, 907. 4 


267. 63 


November 


3, 382, 625 


1, 691. 32 


2, 046, 488 


59, 196 


236.78 


December 


5, 934, 000 


2, 967 


3, 590, 070 


103, 845 


415.38 


1891. 

January 


4,033, 281 


2, 017 


2, 440, 570 


70,595 


282.38 


February 


6,005,042 


3, 003 


3, 633, 630 


105, 105 


420. 42 


March 


8, 828, 000 


4,414 


5, 340, 940 


154,490 


617.96 


April 


5,224,000 


2, 612 


3, 160, 520 


91,420 


365.68 


May 


2,222,000 


1,111 


1,344,310 


38,885 


155.54 



[Copper matte calculated on a basis of 60$ per cent fine copper, 32 ounces silver, and 0.10 ounce pure 

gold per ton ] 



Year. 


Pounds. 


Tons. 


Pounds fine 
copper. 


Ounces of 
silver. 


Ounces 
of gold. 


1890. 

Jnly 


1,216,000 


608 


735, 680 


19, 456 


60.8 


August 


' 1, 304, 000 


652 


788, 920 


20, 864 


65.2 


September 


464,000 


232 


280, 720 


7, 420 


23.2 



The quantity of gold contained in this matte was approximately 
3,167.37 fine ounces, of the value of $65,475, and the quantity of silver 
802,285 fine ounces, worth, at the average price of silver for the year, 
$838,388. 

United States silver coins were exported of the value of $236,323. 

Foreign silver bullion was reexported of the value of $29,914, and 
foreign silver ores of the value of $104,175. 

Foreign silver coin was reexported of the value of $8,527,360. 

The exports of silver during the last fiscal year may be recapitulated 
as follows: 

Exports of Silver, 1891. 



Items. 


Amount. 


Domestic bars (commercial vnlno) 


$13, 797, 391 
838, 388 
236, 323 


Silver contained in copper matte 




* 




Total domestic 




14, 872, 102 


Foreign silver coin reexported 

Silver in foreign ores reexported 

Foreign silver bullion reexported 


$8,527,360 

104, 175 

29, 914 


Total foreign 




8,661,449 


Total silver exports _ 


23, 533, 551 








44 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

From the above table it will be seen that there was a net gain of 
silver to the United States during the year, by excess of imports over 
exports, of the value of $2,745,365. 

In the Appendix will be found the usual tables exhibiting the move- 
ments of the precious metals to and from the United States each month 
during the year, and also tables showing the countries from which the 
precious metals were shipped to the United States and the countries to 
which the precious metals exported from the United States were con- 
signed. 



STOCK OF MONEY IN THE UNITED STATES. 

It lias been the practice to present in the reports of this Bureau an 
estimate, based upon official tabulations, of the stock of gold and silver 
coin in the country. 

The foundation of these estimates was the actual amount of gold in 
the Treasury and in National banks on June 30, 1872, with an addition 
of $20,000,000 as the minimum amount of gold coin in circulation in 
the States of the Pacific slope. No allowance was made for the amount 
in circulation in the States east of the Rocky Mountains. 

Since that date the official estimates, presented from year to year, 
have been prepared, by adding to the actual stock June 30, 1872, the 
annual coinage of the mints (less the amount of our own coin melted 
for recoinage), and the gain (or loss) by import and export of our own 
coin, with an annual allowance for melting of United States coin for 
use in the arts and industries. 

In continuation of previous tabulations, the following estimate of the 
stock of United States coin in the couutry on July 1, 1891, is pre- 
sented : 

Official Table of Stock of Coin in the United States July 1 , 1891 . 



Items- 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Total. 

$1, 076, 184, 220 
62, 444, 222 
88,917 


Estimated stock of coin July 1, 1890 


$629, 932, 449 
24, 172, 202 


$446, 251, 771 
38, 272, 020 
88, 917 


Net imports of United States coin, fiscal year 1891 


654, 104, 651 


484, 612, 708 


1, 138, 717, 359 


Loss: 

Net exports of United States coin for fiscal year 1891 . . . 
United States coin melted for recuinage, fiscal year 1891 . 
United States coin used in the arts, fiscal year 1891 

Total 


64, 880, 754 
583,847 
3, 500, 000 


904, 740 
200, 000 


64, 880, 754 
1, 488, 587 
3, 700, 000 


68, 964, 601 
585, 140, 050 


1, 104, 740 
483, 507, 968 


70, 069, 341 
1, 068, 648, 018 


Estimated stock of coin July 1, 1891 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



45 



In addition to the gold and silver coin in the country July 1, 1891, 
gold and silver bullion belonging to the Government was stored in the 
mints and assay offices, at that date, valued as follows : 

Bullion in Mints and Assay Offices, July 1 , 1891 . 



Metals. 


Value. 


Gold \ 


$61,442,802 
33, 094, 234 


Silver (cost) 


Total 


94,537,036 





The stock of silver bullion outside Government vaults, is not known 
except the bars with the Mercantile Safe Deposit Company in New 
York City, which, according to the report of that company to the New 
York Stock Exchange, contained, at the close of business June 30, 1891, 
to 5,605,470 ounces of fine silver, of the market value of $5,675,538. 

Adding the value of the silver bullion in the vaults of the Mercantile 
Safe Deposit Company and the value of the gold and silver bullion in 
Government institutions to the stock of coin, the total metallic stock of 
the United States, July 1, 1891, was as follows: 

Metallic Stock, July 1 , 1891 . 



Coin and bullion. 


Value. 


Gold 


$646, 582, 852 
522, 277, 740 


Silver (bullion in mints and Mercantile Safe Deposit Company) 

Total 


1, 168, 860, 592 





While the total metallic stock was increased during the year by the 
sum of $10,085,644, there was a loss of gold of $48,980,177, and a gain 
of silver of $59,065,821, as compared with the stocks of these metals 
respectively at the commencement of the year. 

This loss of gold was due to the heavy export of United States gold 
coin during the spring and summer of 1891. 

The ownership of the stock of United States coin and gold and silver 
bullion in the country is exhibited in the following table: 



Digitized by ^.ooQle 






46 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Ownership of Gold and Silver in the United States, July 1 , 1891 . 



Ownership. 


Gold coin and 
bullion. 


Silver coin and bullion. 


Total gold 
and silver 
coin and 
bullion. 


Silver 

dollars. 


Subsidiary 
silver coin. 


Silver 

bullion. 


Total 

silver. 


United States Troasury 


*$119,200,620 


t$39, 597, 123 


$19,629,480 1 


$33,094,234 


$92,320,837 


$211,521,457 


National banks (July 9, 














1891) 


£158, 311, 452 


§27, 434, 165 


5,023,920 




32,458,085 


190,769,537 


Private banks and in- 




dividuals 


369,070,780 


338, 627, 980 


53, 195, 300 


5, 675, 538 


397, 498,818 


766,569,598 


Total 


646,582,852 


405, 659, 268 


77,848,700 


38, 769, 772 


522,277,740 


1,168,860,592 



‘Gold coin and bullion in Treasury exclusive of $120,003,009 gold certificates outstanding, 
t Silver dollars in Treasury, exclusive of $307,235,900 silver certificates outstanding. 

^Includes $70,610,310 Treasury and clearing-house gold certificates. 

§ Includes $19,802,095 silver certificates held by national banks. 

The following table exhibits the stock of metallic and paper money 
in the United States and the location of the same July 1, 1891: 

Location of the Moneys of the United States, July 1 , 1891 . 



Moneys. 


In Treasury. 


In national 
banks (July 9, 
1891). 


In other banks 
and general 
circulation. 


Total. 


METALLIC. 












$61, 442, 802 






$61, 442, 802 




33, 094, 234 




5, 675, 538 


38, 769, 772 


Gold coin 


177,820,887 


*94, 401, 142 


312, 918, 021 


585, 140, 050 


Silver dollars 


346, 833, 089 


7, 631, 470 


51, 194, 709 


405, 659, 268 


Subsidiary silver coin 


19, 629, 480 


5, 023, 920 


53, 195, 300 


77,848,700 


Total 


628, 820, 492 


107, 056, 532 


422, 983, 568 J 


1, 168,860, 592 


PAPER. 










Legal-tender notes (old issue) 


25, 348, 656 


100, 399, 811 


220, 932, 549 


346,681,016 


Legal-tender notes (act July 14, 1890). 


9, 879, 713 





40, 348, 704 


50,228,417 


Gold certificates 


32, 423, 360 


63,910,310 


56, 152, 759 


152,486,429 


Sliver certificates 


7,479, 219 


19, 802, 695 


287, 433, 271 


314,715, 185 


National-bank notes 


5, 706, 928 


t24, 710, 899 


137, 510, 147 


167,927,974 


Currency certificates 


1, 905, 000 


21,875,000 




23, 780, 000 






Total 


82, 742, 876 


230,698,715 


742,377,430 


1,055, 819,021 



‘Includes $0,700,000 gold clearing-house certificates, 
t Includes $3,291,922 of their own notes held by different national banks. 



The number of silver dollars in circulation — that is, outside of Treas- 
ury vaults — was, on July 1, 1891, $58,826,179, against $56,278,749 at 
the commencement of the year, an increase of $2,547,430; while the 
number of silver dollars owned by the people — that is, silver dollars and 
silver certificates in actual circulation — aggregated $366,062,145, against 
$353,834,987 at the commencement of the year, an increase of $12,227,158 
in the silver circulation of the United States. 

The number of silver dollars owned by the Treasury on July 1, 1891, 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 47 

was $30,507,123, against $15,501,470 at the commencement of the fiscal 
year. 

The total metallic and paper money in the United States July 1, 1801, 
exclusive of the holdings of the United States Treasury and of the 
silver bullion in the vaults of the Mercantile Safe Deposit Company, 
was $1,407,440,707, against $1,420,307,302 at the commencement of the 
fiscal year, an increase of $68,133,405. 

The following table exhibits, approximately, the stock of United 
States gold and silver coins in the country on November 1, 1801: 

Stock of Gold and Silver Coin in the United States, November 1 , 1891 . 



Date. 


Gold coin. 


Silver coin. 


Total gold and 
silver coin. 


Silver dollars.! Subsidiary. 


Total silver 
coin. 


Stock July 1 , 1891 


$585, 140, 050 


$405. 659, 268 


$77, 848, 700 


$483, 507, 968 


$1,068, 648,018 


Gain since that date 


11, 246, 222 


3, 816, 100 


-547, 185 


3, 268. 915 


14, 515, 137 


Stock, November 1, 1891 . 


596,386,272 


409, 475, 368 


77, 301,515 


486, 776, 883 


1,083, 163, 155 



The value of the gold and silver bullion in the mints and assay offices 
at the same date was as follows : 

Gold and Silver Bullion in Mints and Assay Offices, November 1 , 1891 . 



Metals. 


Cost value. 


Gold 


$74, 753, 259 
48, 482, 492 




Total 


123, 235, 751 





The market value of the silver bullion reported by the Mercantile Safe 
Deposit Company to the Stock Exchange as in its vaults at the close 
of business October 31, 1801, was $3,082,240. 

Adding the visible stock of bullion — that is, gold and silver bullion in 
the mints and silver bullion in the vaults of the Mercantile Safe Deposit 
Company — to the stock of coin, the total metallic stock on November 1, 
1801, was approximately as follows : 

Metallic Stock, November 1 , 1891 . 



Coin and Bullion. 


Amount. 


Gold 


$671, 139, 531 
539, 241, 624 


Silver (bullion in mints and Mercantile Safe Deposit Company) 


Total 


1, 210, 381,155 





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48 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The following table exhibits the amount of paper and metallic money 
in the United States and the location of the same on November 1, 
1891: 

Location of the Moneys of the United States, November 1 , 1891 . 



/ Moneys. 


In Treasury. 


Outside of 
Treasury. 


Total. 


METALLIC. 


$74,753,259 
48, 482, 492 




$74,753,250 

52,464,741 


Silver bullion 


$3,982,249 


Gold coin 


189, 615,905 


406, 770, 367 


596,386,272 


Silver dollars 


347,339,907 


62, 135, 461 


409, 475, 368 


Subsidiary silver coin 


15, 196, 379 


02, 105, 136 


77, 301, 515 


Total 


675, 387, 942 1 


534, 993, 213 


1, 210, 381, 155 


PAPER. 






! 


Legal-tender notes, old issue 


14, 127, 027 


332, 553,989 


346, 681, 016 


Legal-tender notes (act J uly 14, 1890) 


i 2, 251, 786 


66, 473, 484 


68, 725, 270 


Gold certificates 


20, 790, 420 


136, 100, 319 


156, 890, 739 


Silver certificates 


2, 525, 759 


321, 142, 642 


323,668 401 


National-bank notes 


5, 738, 795 


166, 445,763 


172, 184, 558 


Currency certificates 


330,000 


10,765, 000 


11, 095, 000 


Total 


45, 763, 787 


1, 033, 481, 197 


1,079, 244,984 



From an examination of this table it will be seen that the amount of 
metallic and paper money in circulation, that is outside of the Treasury 
vaults, and exclusive of the stock of silver bullion in New York City, 
was $1,504,492,161 against $1,499,004,121 at the same date last year, 
showing an increase in the amount of money in actual circulation in the 
United States of $65,488,040. 

The following table exhibits, approximately, the stock of gold and 
silver and u uncovered” paper money in the United Kingdom, France, 
Germany, and the United States at the present time, and the amount 
per capita. 

The stocks of gold and silver are of course estimates made by the 
best recognized authorities. In the case of Great Britain the estimate 
is that of the deputy master of the royal mint, and in the case of Ger- 
many it is based upon one by Dr. A. Soetbeer. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



49 



Estimated Stock of Gold and Silver and Actual Amount of “Uncovered” Paper 
Money, in the United Kingdom, France, Germany, and the United States. 



Countries. 


Population. 


Gold stock. 


Silver stock. 


Uncovered 

notes. 


Total metallic 
stock and un- 
covered notes. 


United Kingdom 

France 

Germany 

United States 


38. 000. 000 

39. 000. 000 
49, 500, 000 

64.000. 000 


$550, 000, 000 
900, 000,000 

540. 000. 000 

671. 000, 000 


$107, 000, 000 

700. 000. 000 
220, 000,000 

539. 000. 000 


$40, 000, 000 
88, 000,000 
150, 000, 000 
409,764,000 


$697, 000, 000 
1, 688, 000, 000 
910, 000, 000 
1,619,764,000 





Per capita. 


Gold, j Silver. 


Paper. 


Total. 


United Kingdom 


$14.47 1 $2.81 
23.08 17.95 

i 10.91 i 4.44 

10.48 | 8.42 


$1.05 

2.26 

3.03 

6.40 


$18. 33 

43.29 
18.38 

25.30 


France - 


Germany 

United States 



In this table the gold certificates outstanding are embraced in the 
gold stock, and the silver certificates and Treasury notes in the silver 
stock, and the same amounts have been deducted from the amount of 
paper money outstanding. From the Jegal tender notes outstanding 
have been deducted $100,000,000 gold held in the Treasury. 

The following table, from the u Bulletin de Statistique,” shows the me- 
tallic stock of the principal banks of issue of Europe, and the division of * 
the same between gold and silver, and the notes in circulation; and the 
ratio of reserve to circulation, on the 1st of April of the present year: 



The Metallic Reserves and Circulation of the Principal Banks of Issue 

of Europe, April 1 , 1891 . 

[From the “ Bulletin do Statistique,” May, 1891.] 



Name of bank. 


Metallic; re- 
serve. 


Composition of the reserve. 


Notes in cir- 
culation. 


Ratio of 
reserve to 
circulation. 


Gold. 


I Silver. 








I 




Per cent. 


Imperial Bank of Germany 


$201,782,000 




1 


$251,151,000 


80 


Austro-Hungarian Bank 


106, 208, 000 


$26, 209, 000 


| $79, 999, 000 


194,197,000 


55 


National Bank of Belgium 


21,384,000 






74, 247, 000 


29 


National Bank of Bulgaria 


676,000 


l 


251, 000 


270 


Bank of Denmark 


13, 722, 000 


1 


20, 014, 000 


69 


Bank of Spain 


49, 717, 000 


29,239,000 


20, 477, 000 


143, 148, 000 


35 


Bank of France 


475, 629, 000 


235,055,000 


240, 382, 000 


601, 986, 000 


79 


Great Britain: 












Bank of England 


111,940,000 






119, 178, 000 


94 


Banks of Scotland 


21,076,000 


17,428,000 


3, 648,000 


28, 429, 000 


74 


National Bank of Greece 


695,000 






21,018,000 


3 


Italy: 








National Bank 


38, 658, 000 


33,370,000 


5, 346, 000 


111, 786, 000 


34 


Institutions of issue 


41, 939, 000 


36, 284, 000 


5, 655, 000 


93,065,000 


45 


Bank of Norway 


5, 211,000 






13, 163, 000 


40 


Bank of Netherlands 


47, 864, 000 


20,458,000 


27, 406, 000 


78, 184, 000 


61 


Bank of Portugal 


3,995,000 


1, 949, 000 


2, 046,000 


8, 318, 000 


48 


National Bank of Roumania 


9, 785, 000 






21,114,000 


46 


Imperial Bank of Russia 


212, 532, 000 


207, 128, 000 


5, 404,000 


693, 874, 000 


30 


Royal Bank of Sweden 


5, 327,000 


4, 651,000 


676,000 


10, 808, 000 


50 


Swiss banks 


15, 730, 000 


11, 927,000 


3, 802, 000 

1 


30, 108, 000 


52 



10285 M 1 



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50 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



HOLD AND SILVER USED IN THE INDUSTRIAL ARTS. 

The following table exhibits the quantity and value of the gold and 
silver bars furnished manufaeturers and jewelers by the United States 
assay office at New York during the calendar year 1890, and the ma- 
terial employed : 

Bars Manufactured for Use in the Industrial Arts by tiie United States 
Assay Office at New York during the Calendar Year ended December 
31 , 1890 . 



Material used. 


Gold. ’ 


Silver. 


Fine ounces. 


Value, j 


i 

Fine ounces. 


Value. 


Domestic bullion 

United States coin 

Foreign material 

Old plate, jewelry, etc 


420,432. 621 
47.998 
17, 514. 745 
103, 743. 207 


$8,815, 145 
992 
362, 062 
! 2,144,502 


2, 554, 089. 02 
613. 01 
963, 018. 21 
308.966.10 1 


$3, 303, 032 
793 
1, 245, 114 
399, 471 


Total 


| 547,738.571 ; 11,322,761 


3,827,280.40 4,948,410 



The following table exhibits the value of the gold and silver bars 
furnished for industrial use by the mint at Philadelphia during the 
calendar year 1890, and the material employed in the composition of 
such bars : 

Bars Manufactured for Use in the Industrial Arts by the United States 
Mint at Philadelphia during the Calendar Year ended December 31 , 1890 . 



Material used. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Fine ounces. 


Value. 


Fine ounces. 


Coining 

value. 




34, 998. 325 
1,657. 026 


$723, 479 
34, 254 


102, 649. 09 
409. 54 
274. 93 
12,604.54 


$114, 055 
455 
305 
14,005 


United States coin 


Foreign material 


Old plate, jewelry, etc 

Total 


3,228.079 ! 


66, 730 


1 39, 883. 430 


824, 463 


115, 938. 10 


128, 820 



For the purpose of ascertaining the value of gold and silver bars fur- 
nished by private works for industrial purposes, a circular letter, inclos- 
ing a form of report, was addressed to thirty-nine firms in the United 
States, believed to comprise all the private works engaged in the busi- 
ness of making gold and silver bars. 

Replies have been received from thirty-eight of the thirty-nine firms 
addressed, of which number sixteen reported that they had not manu- 
factured any bars for industrial use during the year, while twenty-two 
furnished a statement in detail showing the value and composition of 
the bars so furnished. 

The returns on the part of private works are more complete than 
for any previous inquiry, showing that much popular interest is taken 



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Google 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



51 



in this important subject. The thanks of the Bureau are due, and 
are hereby extended, to the officers in charge of private works in the 
United States who have so courteously furnished the information asked 
for. 

The result of this inquiry upon the part of private works is exhibited 
in the following table: 

Bars for Industrial use Furnished Goldsmiths and Others by Private Re- 
fineries DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1890. 



Material used. 


Gold bars manufactured. 


Silver bars manufactured. 


Fine ounces. 


Valne. 


Fine ounces. 


Coining 

value. 


Domestic bullion (exclusive of United States bars) 

United States bars 

United States coin 

Old plate, jewelry, and other old material 

Total 


57, 026. 800 
100, 773. 687 
20, 060. 870 
41, 850. 857 


$1, 178, 848 
2, 083, 177 
414, 695 
865,134 


2, 882, 251. 97 
371, 479. 71 
600. 18 
175, 279. 50 


$3, 726, 548 
480, 297 
776 
226, 624 


219, 712. 214 


4, 541, 854 


3,429, 611. 36 


4, 434, 245 





Number of firms addressed 39 Number not manufacturing 16 

Number replying ; .38 Number manufacturing 22 



Of the bars furnished by private works to goldsmiths and others for 
industrial uses $2,083,177 in gold, and $480,297 in silver, were what 
are known as “ United States bars,” that is, bars bearing the stamp of 
a mint or Government assay office. As these are included in the bars 
reported by Government institutions as issued for the same purpose, to 
prevent duplication the value of these bars must be deducted from the 
totals reported by private works. 

Eliminating, therefore, the value of “United States bars” furnished 
by private works, the following table exhibits the work of private re- 
fineries in this line during the calendar year 1890 : 

Bars for Industrial use (exclusive of Government Bars), Furnished Gold- 
smiths AND OTHERS BY PRIVATE REFINERIES DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1890. 



Material used. 


Gold bars manufactured. 


Silver bars manufactured. 


Fine ounces. 


Value. 


Fine ounces. 


Coining 

value. 


Domestic bullion 

United States coin 

Old plate, jewelry, and other old material 

Total 


57, 026. 800 
20, 060. 870 
41, 850. 857 


$1,178,848 
414, 695 
865, 134 


2, 882, 251. 97 
600.18 
175, 279. 50 


$3, 726, 548 
776 
226,624 


118,938,527 


2,458,677 


3, 058, 131. 65 


3,953,948 





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52 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The following is a summary of the work of Government and private 
institutions in the preparation of bars for industrial use during the cal- 
endar year 1890: 

Gold and Silver Bars furnished for use in Manufactures and the Arts 
DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1890, AND CLASSIFICATION OF THE MATERIAL USED. 



Material. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Total. 




$10,717, 472 
440,041 
362,062 
3,076, 426 


$7, 143, 635 
2,024 
1, 245, 419 
640, 100 


$17, 861, 107 
451, 065 
1,607,481 
3,716, 526 


United States coin 


Foreign bullion and coin 

Old material 


Total 


14,605,001 | 9,031,178 


23, 637, 079 





For the purpose of comparison, a table exhibiting the work of Gov- 
ernment institutions and private refineries in this line during the cal- 
endar year 1889 is here presented: 

Gold and Silver Bars furnished for use in Manufactures and the Arts 

DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1889, AND CLASSIFICATION OF THE MATERIAL USED. 



Material. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Total. 




$426, 879 
9, 686, 827 
291, 258 
3, 218, 971 


$2, 373 
7, 297, 933 
657,997 
611,015 


$429, 252 
16, 984, 760 
949, 255 
3, 829, 986 




Foreign coin and bullion 


Old material ... 


Total 


13,623,935 


8, 560, 318 


22, 193, 253 





Comparing the totals for the two years, it will be seen that the quan- 
tity of both gold and silver employed for industrial purposes is steadily 
increasing in the United States. 

The value of the gold bars reported as furnished for industrial use 
during the calendar year 1889 was $13,623,935, and in 1890, $14,605,901, 
an increase of $981,966, and silver, $9,031,178 in 1890 against $8,569,318 
in the preceding year. 

The amount of gold coin reported as used in the composition of bars 
for industrial uses was only $449,941, against an estimated melting 
down annually of $3,500,000 of our gold coin for industrial uses, based 
upon four censuses taken for different years by this Bureau as to the 
direct employment of the precious metals by goldsmiths and others in 
the manufacture of watches, jewelry, and gilding. The amount of 
United States silver coin reported as melted in the composition of bars 
for industrial use during the last year was only $2,024, against a reported 
melting down of silver coin by jewelers and others, based upon the cen- 
suses referred to, of $200,000 annually. 

As is well known, the melting of coin for industrial uses is principally 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 53 

upon the part of jewelers, and not by private works manufacturing bars. 
If, therefore, there has been no falling off in the amount of coin used in 
repairs and jewelry, the value of the precious metals used in the indus- 
trial arts in the United States during the calendar year 1890 approxi- 
mated $18,105,901 gold, and $9,231,178 silver (coining value), of which 
$10,717,472 gold and $7,143,635 silver was new bullion. 

It has been the practice of the Bureau to solicit information from 
private refineries as to the preparation of bars of gold and silver only 
for calendar years. The information covering the last fiscal year is 
therefore confined to Government institutions. 

The following tables exhibit the quantity and value of the bars of 
gold and silver issued by Government institutions for industrial uses 
during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1891. 

Bars issued for use in the Industrial Arts, by the United States Assay 
Office at New York, during the Fiscal Year 1891. 



Material used. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Fine ounces. 


Value. 


Fine ounces. 


Value. 


United States coin 

Domestic bullion 

Foreign material 

Old plate, jewelry, etc 

Total 


74. 157 
410,081.260 
18, 060. ‘179 
109, 880. 777 


$1, 532. 96 
8, 477, 132. 01 
373, 341. 16 
2, 271,437. 22 


559.90 
2, 849, 616. 22 
862, 345. 36 
321, 858. 44 


$723. 92 
3, 684, 352. 28 
1,114, 951.58 
416, 140. 21 


538,096. 573 


11, 123, 443.35 


4, 034, 379. 92 


5, 216, 167. 99 



Bars issued by the United States Mint at Philadelphia, for use in the In- 
dustrial Arts, during the Fiscal Year 1891. 



Material used. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Fine ounces. 


Value. 


Fine ounces. 


Value. 




1,731.775 
50, 796. 859 


$35, 798. 97 
1, 050, 064. 26 


177.30 
2, 978. 23 
1, 336. 58 
17,433. 81 


$229. 23 
3, 850. 62 
1, 728. 09 
22, 540. 67 


Domestic bullion 


Foreign material 


Old plate, jewelry etc 


2, 823. 745 


58, 371. 99 


Total 


55, 352. 379 


1, 144, 235. 22 | 21,925.92 


28, 348. 61 





Bars issued by the United States Assay Office at New York and the 
United States Mint at Philadelphia, for use in the Industrial Arts, 
during the Fiscal Year 1891. 



Material used. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Fine ounces. 


1 Value. 


Fine ounces. 


Value. 


United States coin 

Domestic bullion 

Foreign material 

Old plate, jewelry, etc 

Total 


1, 805. 932 
460, 878. 119 
18, 060, 379 
112,704.522 


$37, 331. 93 
9, 527, 196. 27 
373, 341. 16 
2, 329, 809. 21 


737.20 
2,852,594.45 
863, 681. 94 
339, 292. 25 


$953. 15 
3, 688,202.90 
1, 116, 679.67 
438, 680. 88 


593, 448. 952 


12, 267, 678. 57 


4,056,305.84 


5, 244, 516. 60 



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54 



REPORT OP ME DIRECTOR OP THE MINT. 



Comparing the totals of the above tables with the work of the pre- 
ceding fiscal year, it appears that the gold bars paid out at these two in- 
stitutions for use in the industrial arts during the fiscal year 1891 aggre- 
gated $12,267,678.57 against $11,639,980 in the preceding fiscal year, an 
increase of $627,698 in gold. For silver, the amount for the fiscal year 
1891 was $5,244,516.60 against $5,312,349 in the preceding fiscal year, 
a falling off of $67,833. 

PRODUCT OF GOLD AND SILVER. 

The statistics of the product of gold and silver in the United States 
were presented for the calendar year 1890 in a special report to Con- 
gress. 

These statistics are collected only for calendar years. 

The product of gold and silver from the mines of the United States, 
exclusive of foreign bullion and ores reduced in this country, was 
as follows: 



Product of Mines of tiie United States, 1890. 



Metals. 


Fine ounces. 


Commercial 

value. 


Coining 

value. 


Gold 


1,588, 880 
54, 500, 000 


$32, 845, 000 
57, 225, 000 


$32, 845, 000 
70, 464, 645 


Silv-pr 




Total 




90, 070, 000 


103, 309, 645 







The following tables exhibit, approximately, the product of gold 
and silver from the mines and smelters of the United States during 
the calendar year 1890, including the amount obtained from foreign 
material treated. . 

Gold Product of Refineries in the United States, 1890. 



Items. 


Fine ounces (troy). 


Domestic. 


Foreign. 


Total. 


Reported product of private refineries in the United States 

Unrefined gold deposited at Government institutions 

Total 


867, 584 
716, 156 


44,078 
210, 548 


911, 662 
926, 704 


1,583,740 


254, 626 


1,838,366 





Silver Product of Refineries in the United States, 1890. 



Items. 


Fine ounces (troy). 


Domestic. 


Foreign. 


Total. 


Reported product of private refineries in the United States 

Unrefined silver deposited at Government institutions 

Total 


50, 132, 421 
3, 101, 246 


9, 304, 036 
2. 383, 224 


59,436,457 
5, 484, 470 


53, 233, 667 


11, 687, 260 


64, 920, 927 





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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 55 

The distribution of the product of our own mines among producing 
States and Territories was, approximately, as follows: 

Approximate Distribution, by Producing States and Territories, of the 
Product of Gold and Silver from tiie mines of the United States for 
the Calendar Year 1890. 





Gold. 


Silver. 




State or Territory. 










Total value. 












Fine ounces, j 


Value. 


Fine ounces. 


Coining value. 




Alaska 


36,886 1 


$762, 500 


7,500 


$9, 697 


$772, 197 


Arizona 


48,375 j 


1,000,000 


1,000,000 


1,292,929 


2, 292, 929 


California 


604,687 | 


12, 500, 000 


900,000 


1, 163, 636 


13, 663, 636 


Colorado 


200, 756 j 


4, 150,000 


18, 800, 000 


24, 307, 070 


28, 457, 070 


Georgia 


4,837 


100, 000 


400 


517 


100, 517 


Idaho 


89,494 ; 


1,850,000 


3, 700, 000 


4, 783, 838 


6, 633, 838 


Michigan 


4,354 


90,000 


55, 000 


71,111 


161,lil 


Montana 


159,638 


3, 300, 000 


15, 750, 000 


20, 363, 636 


23, 663, 636 


Nevada 


135,450 


2, 800,000 


4, 450, 000 


5, 753, 535 


8,553,535 


New Mexico 


41,119 


850,000 


1, 300, 000 


1, 680, 808 


2, 530, 808 


North Carolina 


5,732 


118,500 


6, 000 


7, 757 


126, 257 


Oregon 


53,213 


1,100,000 


75, 000 


96, 969 


1, 196, 969 


South Carolina 


4,837 i 


100,000 


400 


517 


100, 517 


South Dakota 1 


154,800 


3, 200, 000 


100, 000 


129,292 


3, 329, 292 


Texas 




1 


300,000 


387, 878 


387, 878 


Utah 


32,895 


680, 000 


8, 000, 000 


10, 343,434 


11,023,434 


Washington 


9,869 


204,000 


70,000 


90,505 


294, 505 


Alabama, Maryland, Ten- 












nessee, Virginia, Vermont, 












and Wyoming 


1,935 


40,000 


2, 000 


2, 585 


42, 585 


Total 1 


1,588,877 


32, 845, 000 


54,516, 300 


70, 485, 714 


103, 330, 714 



In the Appendix will be found a table showing the annual product of 
gold and silver from the mines of the United States since 1792. 

A table will also be found, compiled principally from information 
furnished at the instance of this Bureau by foreign governments through 
our diplomatic representatives abroad, and revised from the latest re- 
turns at hand, exhibiting the quantity and value of the gold and silver 
product of the principal producing countries of the world for the calen- 
dar years 1888, 1889, and 1890. 

In the preparation of this table, in cases where official estimates or 
reports were not at hand, either the product officially reported for the 
preceding or some near year has been used by way of estimate, or the 
product as ascertained from other reliable sources; but in cases where 
the product credited a producing country is not an official estimate this 
fact, as well as the data upon which the estimate is based, has been 
stated in a footnote. 

The value of silver in this table, as in similar tables for preceding 
years, published in the reports of this Bureau, has, for the purpose of 
uniformity, been reckoned at the coining rate in silver dollars, viz, 
$1.2929 per fine ounce. 



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56 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The following table exhibits the product of the precious metals in the 
world for each calendar year, since 1873. The silver product is given at 
its commercial value, calculated at the average market price of silver 
each year, as well as at its coining value: 

Product of Gold and Silver in the World, Calendar Years 1873-1890. 



Calendar years. 


Gold. 


Fine ounces 
(troy). 


Silver. 

Commercial 

value. 


Coining 

value. 




$96, 200, 000 


63, 267, 000 


$82,120,000 


$81,800,000 


1874 


90, 750, 000 


55, 300, 000 


70, 673, 000 


71,500,000 


1875 


97, 500, 000 


62,262,000 


77, 578, 000 


80, 500, 000 


1876 


103, 700, 000 


67,753,000 


78, 322, 000 


87, 600, 000 


1877 


114, 000, 000 


62,648,000 


75, 240, 000 


81,000,000 


1878 


119, 000,000 


73,476,000 


84, 644, 000 


95, 000, 000 


1879 


109, 000, 000 


74, 250, 000 


83,383,000 


96, 000,000 


1880 


106, 500, 000 


74, 791, 000 


85, 636, 000 


96, 700, 000 


1881 


103, 000, 000 


78. 890, 000 


89, 777, 000 


102, 000, 000 


1882 


102.000,000 


86, 470, 000 


98, 230, 000 


111,800,000 


1883 


95, 400, 000 


89, 177, 000 


98, 986, 000 


115, 300,000 


1884 


101, 700, 000 


81, 597, 000 


90, 817, 000 


105, 500, 000 




108, 400, 000 


91,652,000 


97. 564, 000 


118,500,000 


1886 


106, 000, 000 


93, 276, 000 


92, 772, 000 


120,600, 000 


1887 


105,775, 000 


96, 124, 000 


94. 031, 000 


124,281,000 


1888 


110, 197, 000 


. 108,827,000 


102, 185. 000 


140, 706, 000 


1889 


122, 438, 500 


123, 500, 000 


115,487, 000 


159,678,000 


1890 


116, 009, 000 


128, 914, 000 


134, 886, 000 


166, 677, 000 



WORLD’S COINAGE. 

In the Appendix will be found a table exhibiting the coinage of each 
nation, so far as reported, during the calendar years 1888, 1889, and 
1890. 

The following summary is presented : 

World’s Coinage. 



Calendar years. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


1888 


$134, 828, 855 
168, 901, 519 
149, 009, 772 


$134, 922, 344 
138, 444, 595 
149,405,099 


1889 


1890 





It should be remembered that the coinage executed does not represent 
the amount of new gold and silver, of current production, made into 
coins during the year, for the reason that the coinages reported include 
the value of domestic and foreign coins melted for recoinage as well as 
old material, plate, etc., used in coinage. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



57 



Governments were requested to report, in addition to the coinage of 
gold and silver, the data covering recoinages, but failed to do so in many 
instances. 

The following table of recoinages for the calendar years 1889 and 
1890 has been prepared from information furnished by foreign govern- 
ments. 



Recoinages Reported by Certain Countries, Calendar Years 1889 and 1890. 



Countries. 


1889. 


1890. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Gold. 


Silver. 




$4, 666, 442 
2,937,084 
658, 982 
1,148 
l fl 596, 801 


$1,173, 526 
1,129,476 


$8,840, 150 
15, 808, 519 
373, 669 


' $3, 373, 000 

1,444,844 








4, 731, 944 


2, 942, 450 




2, 315, 919 




217, 125 


279, 850 
1,479, 152 
1,091 
540,000 
84,420 






467, 716 






60,208 


Portugal 




407, 160 


Netherlands 




132,660 

177,079 


Germany 


7,946,065 

9,229 


2, 191, 691 
922,417 


.Austria-Hungary 


928,653 


Denmark 


27, 607 
23, 718 
127, 389 
762, 480 
65, 156 
23, 539 


Norway 






20, 368 
253, 867 


Sweden 






Russia 




433, 752 


Colombia 






Japan 


j 15 




1,125 


Total 




17,815, 766 


8,651,907 


31,760, 993 


11,348, 820 





VALUE OF FOREIGN COINS. 



The law requires : 

That the value of foreign coins as expressed in the money of account of the United 
States shall be that of the pure metal of such coin of standard value ; and the values 
of the standard coins in circulation of the various nations of the world shall be 
estimated quarterly by the Director of the Mint, and be proclaimed by the Secretary 
of the Treasury immediately after the passage of this act and thereafter quarterly 
on the 1st day of January, April, July, and October in each year. 



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58 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



In accordance with the above requirement the values of foreign coin& 
were estimated by me, and proclaimed by the Secretary of the Treasury, 
on January 1, April 1, July 1, and October 1, 1891, to be as follows: 

Values of Foreign Coins, January 1 , 1891 . 



Country. 


Standard. 


Monetary unit. 


Value in terms of 
United States 
gold dollar. 


Coins. 


Argentine Republic. 


Gold and sil- 


Peso 


$0. 90, 5 


Gold: argentine ($4.82,4) and i ar- 




ver. 






gentine. Silver: peso and divi- 










sions. 


Austria-Hungary. . . 


Silver 


Florin 


.38,1 


Gold: 4 florins ($1.92,9), 8 florins 










($3.85,8), ducat ($2.28,7), and 4 










ducats ($9.15,8). Silver: 1 and 2 










florins. 






Franc 


.19,3 






ver. 




francs. 


Bolivia 




Boliviano 


.77,1 




Brazil 




Milreis 


.54,6 










1, and 2 milreis. 




Gold 


Dollar 


1.00 




North America 










(except New found- 










land). 










Central American 










States : 










Costa Rica 












Guatemala 
















Silver 


Peso 


.77,1 


Silver : peso and divisions. 


Nicaragua 








Salvador 












Chili 


Gold and sil- 


Peso 


.91,2 


Gold: escudo ($1.82,4), doubloon 




ver. 




($4.56,1), and condor ($9.12,3). Sil- 










ver : peso and divisions. 






( Shanghai . . 


1. 13, 9 






Silver 


Tael < H a i k wan 


1.27 








{ (customs). 








Silver 


Peso 


.77,1 


Gold : condor ($9.64,7) and double 








condor. Silver : peso. 




Gold and sil- 


Peso 


.92,6 


Gold: doubloon ($5.01,7). Silver: 




ver. 




peso. 




Gold 


Crown 


.26, 8 


Gold : 10 and 20 crowns. 




Silver 


Sucre 


.77, 1 


Gold: condor ($9.64,7) and double- 










condor. Silver: sucre and divi- 










sions. 


Egypt 


Gold 


Pound (100 pias- 


4. 94, 3 


Gold : pound (100 piasters), 50 pias- 






ters). 




ters, 20 piasters, 10 piasters, and 










5 piasters. Silver: 1,2,5,10, and 










20 piasters. 




Gold 


Mark 


.19,3 


Gold: 20 marks ($3.85,9), 10 marks 








($1.93). 



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REPORT OE THE DIRECTOR 6E THE MINT. 59 



Values of Foreign Coins, January 1, 1891 — Continued. 



Country. 


Standard. 


Monetary unit. 


Value in terms of 
United States 
gold dollar. 


Coins. 


France 


Gold and sil- 


Franc 


$0. 19, 3 


Gold: 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 francs. 




ver. 






Silver: 5 francs. 




Gold 




.23,8 






Gold 




4. 86, 6£ 










and £ sovereign. 








.19,3 






ver. 






Silver: 5 drachmas. 






Gourde 


.96,5 


Silver: gourde. 




ver. 






Silver 


Rupee 


.36,6 


Gold: nioliur ($7.10,5). Silver: ru- 








pee and divisions. 


Italy 




Lira 


.19,3 


Gold: 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 liras. Sil- 




ver. 




ver: 5 liras. 


Japan 


Gold and sil- 


Ten ..5e° W •••■ 


.99,7 


Gold : 1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 yen. 




ver.* 


( silver . . . 


.83,1 


Silver: yen. 




Gold 




1.00 




Mexico 


Silver 


Dollar 


.83,7 


Gold: dollar ($0.98,3), 2.+ 5, 10, and 










20 dollars. Silver: dollar (or peso) 










and divisions. 


Netherlands 


Gold and sil- 


Florin 


.40,2 


Gold: 10 florins. Silver: l,and2£ 




ver. 






j florins. 


Newfoundland 


Gold 1 


Dollar 


1. 01,4 


! Gold: 2 dollars ($2.02,7+). 


Norway 


Gold I 


Crown 


.26,8 


• Gold : 10 and 20 crowns. 


Peru 


Silver 


Sol 


.77, 1 


j Silver: sol and divisions. 


Portugal 


Gold 


Milreis 


1.08 


' Gold : 1, 2, 5, and 10 milreis. 


Russia 


Silver 


Rouble 


.61,7 


j Gold: imperial ($7.71,8), and J im- 










perial ($3.86, 0).t Silver: £, + and 










1 rouble. 


Spain 


Gold and sil- 


Peseta 


.19,3 


Gold: 25 pesetas. Silver: 5 pesetas. 




ver. 




Sweden 


Gold 


Crown 


.26,8 


Gold: 10 and 20 crowns. 


Switzerland 


Gold and sil- 


Franc 


.19,3 


Gold: 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 francs. 




ver. 




Silver: 5 francs. 


Tripoli 


Silver 


Mahbub of 20 pi- 


.69,5 








asters. 






Tiirkey 


Gold 


Piaster 


.04,4 


Gold: 25, 50, 100, 250, and 500 pias- 








ters. 


Venezuela 


Silver ... 


Bolivar 


.15,4 


Gold: 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 bolivars. 










Silver: 5 bolivars. 



* Gold the nominal standard. Silver practically the standard, 
t Coined since January 1, 1886. Old half-imperial = $3.98, 0. 



f i r 



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60 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Values of Foreign Coins, April 1 , 1891. 



Country. 


Standard. 


Monetary unit. 


Value 

in 

terms 
of U. S. 

dollar. 


Coins. 


A rgentine Republic . 


Gold and ail- 


Peso 


$0. 96,5 


Gold : argentine ($4.82,4) and $ ar- 




ver. 






gentine. Silver : peso and divisions. 


Austria-Hungary . . * 


Silver 


Florin 


.36,3 


Gold: 4 tiorins ($1.92,9), 8 florins 










($3.85,8), ducats ($2.28,7) and 4 du- 










cats ($9.15,8). Silver: 1 and 2 










florins. 




Gold and sil- 




.19,3 


Gold: 10 and 20 francs. Silver: 5 




ver. 




francs. 




Silver 




.73.5 


Silver: boliviano and divisions. 




Gold 




.54,6 


Gold: 5, 10, and 20milreis. Silver: 








$, 1, and 2 milreis. 




Gold 




1.00 




N. A. (exceptNew- 










foundland). 










Central American 










States— 










Costa Rica 










Guatemala 










Honduras 




pe80 


.73,5 


Silver: peso and divisions. 


Nicaragua 






Salvador 










Chili 




r^avt 


.91,2 






vxOiti and ail* 
ver. 




($4.56,1), and condor ($9.12,3). Sil- 










ver: peso and divisions. 






(Shanghai . . 


1. 08. 5 




China _ _ 


Silver 


Tael.<Haik wan 


1. 20, 9 








l (Customs). 




Colombia 


Silver 


Peso 


.73,5 


Gold: condor ($9.64,7) and double 










condor. Silver : peso. 


Cuba 




pegc 


.92,6 






vjroici ana su- 
ver. 




uUUl . UOUDiOOn oil Voi I 

peso. 


Denmark 


Gold 


Crown 


.26,8 


Gold: 10 and 20 crowns. 


Rnnsdor 


Silver 


Sucre 


.73,5 


Gold : condor($9.64,7)and double-con- 








dor. Silver: sucre and divisions. 


Plijfvnt, 


Gold 


Pound (100 pias- 


4.94,3 


Gold, pound (100 piasters;, 50 pias- 






ters. 


tres, 20 piasters, 10 piasters, and 5 










piasters. Silver: 1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 










piasters. 


Finland * r r 


Gold 


Mark 


.19,3 


Gold: 20 marks ($3.85,9), 10 marks 








($1.93). 


France - 


Gold and sil- 


Franc 


.19,3 


Gold: 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 francs. Sil- 




ver 






ver: 5 francs. 


German Empire 


Gh|d 


Mark 


.23,8 


Gold : 5, 10, and 20 marks. 


Great Britain 


Gold 


Pound sterling.. . 


4. 86, 6J 


Gold: sovereign (pound sterling) 






O 'r O' 

and i sovereign. 


Greece 


Gold and sil- 


Drachma 


.19,3 


Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 drachmas. 




ver. 






Silver: 5 drachmas. 


TTayt.i 


Gold and sil- 


Gourde 


.06,5 


Silver: gourde. 




ver. 







Digitized by 



Google 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



61 



Values of Foreign Coins, April 1, 1891— Continued. 



Country. 


Standard. 


Monetary unit. 


Value 

in 

terms 
of U. S. 

gold 

dollar. 


Coins. 


India 


Silver 


Rupee 


|0. 34, 9 


Gold: raohur ($7.10,5). Silver: ru- 
pee and divisions. 


Italy 

Japan 


Gold and sil- 
ver. 

Gold and sil- 


Lira 

v c Gold 


.19,3 

.99,7 


Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 liras. Sil- 
ver: 5 liras. 

Gold : 1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 yen. 


ver.* 


c Silver... 


.79,2 


Silver: yen. 


Liberia 


Gold 


Dollar 


1.00 




Mexico 


Silver 


Dollar 


.80 


Gold : dollar ($0.98,3), 2$, 5, 10, and 20 
dollars. Silver: dollar (or peso) 
and divisions. 


Netherlands 


Gold and sil- 
ver. 


Florin 


.40,2 


Gold : 10 florins. Silver : J, 1, and 2} 
florins. 


Newfoundland 


Gold 


Dollar 


1.01,4 


Gold: 2 dollars ($2.02,7+). 


Norway 


Gold 


Crown 


• 26, 8 


Gold: 10 and 20 crowns. 


Peru 


Silver 


Sol 


.73,5 


Silver: sol and divisions. 


Portugal 


Gold 


Milreis 


1.08 


Gold: 1,2, 5, and 10 milreis. 


Russia 


Silver 


Rouble 


.58,8 


Gold: imperial ($7.71,8) and & impe- 
rial t($3.86, 0). Silver: £,J, and 1 
rouble. 


Spain 


Gold and sil- 
ver. 


Peseta 


.19,3 


Gold: 25 pesetas. Silver: 5 pesetas. 


Sweden 


Gold 


Crown 


.26,8 


Gold : 10 and 20 crowns. 


Switzerland 


Gold and sil- 
ver. 


Franc 


.19,3 


Gold : 5, 10, 29, 50, and 100 francs. Sil- 
ver: 5 francs. 


Tripoli 


Silver 


Mali bub of 20 pi 
asters. 


.66,3 




Turkey 


Gold 


Piaster 


.04,4 


Gold : 25,50, 100,250, and 500 piasters. 


Venezuela 


Silver 


Bolivar 


.14,7 


Gold: 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 bolivars. 
Silver: 5 bolivars. 



*Gold the nominal standard. Silver practically the standard, 
t Coined since January 1, 1886. Old half-imperial=$3.98.«. 



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62 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Values of Foreign Coins July 1 , 1891 . 









Value 








in 


Country. 


Standard. 


Monetary unit. 


terms 
of U. S. 








gold 

dollar. 


Argentine Republic . 


Gold and sil- 


Peso 


$0. 96,5 




ver. 






Austria-Hungary. . . 


Silver 


Florin 


.36,3 








.19,3 




ver. 










.73,6 




Gold 




, 54, 6 




Gold , 




1.00 


N. A. (except 






Newfoundland). 








Central American 








States— 








Costa Rica ' 










Guatemala . . . 
















Peso 


.73,6 


Nicaragua 








Salvador 
















.91,2 




ver. 








f Shanghai. 


1. 08, 7 




Silver 


Tael. -1 Haikwan 


1. 21 






[(customs). 






Silver 


Peso 


.73,6 




Gold and sil- 


Peso 


.92,6 




ver. 






Gold 


Crown 


.26,8 




Silver 


Sucre 


.73,6 


Egypt 


Gold 


Pound (100 pias- 


4.94,3 






ters). 






Gold 


Mark 


.19,3 




Gold and sil- 


Franc 


.19,3 




ver. 






Gold 


Mark 


.23,8 


Great Britain 


Gold 


Pound sterling. . . 


4. 86, 6J 




Gold and sil- 


Drachma 


.19,3 




ver. 






Gold and sil- 


Gourde 


.96,5 




ver. 





Coins. 



Gold : Argentine ($4.82,4) and } Ar- 
gentine. Silver: peso and divi- 
sions. 

Gold: 4 florins ($1.92,9), 8 florins 
($3.85,8), ducat ($2.28,7), and 4 du- 
cats ($9.15,8). Silver: 1 and 2 
florins. 

Gold: 10 and 20 francs. Silver: 5 
francs. 

Silver: Boliviano and divisions. 

Gold : 5, 10, and 20 milreis. Silver : |, 
1, and 2 milreis. 



Silver: peso and divisions. 



Gold: escudo ($1.82,4), doubloon 
($4.50,1), and condor ($9.12,3). Sil- 
ver: peso and divisions. 



Gold: condor ($9.64,7) and double 
condor. Silver: peso. 

Gold: doubloon ($5.01,7). Silver: 
peso. 

Gold : 10 and 20 crowns. 

Gold: condor ($9.64,7) and double 
condor. Silver: sucre and divi- 
sions. 

Gold: pound (100 piasters), 50 pias- 
ters, 20 piasters, 10 piasters, and 
5 piasters. Silver: 1, 2, 5, 10, and 
20 piasters. 

Gold: 20 marks ($3.85,9), 10 marks 
($1.93). 

Gold: 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 francs. 
Silver: 5 francs. 

Gold: 5, 10, and 20 marks. 

Gold: sovereign (pound sterling) 
and & sovereign. 

Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 drachmas. 
Silver : 5 drachmas. 

Silver: gourde. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



63 



Values of Forking Coins July 1 , 1891 — Continued. 



Country. 


Standard. 


Monetary unit. 


Value 

ill 

terms 
of U. S. 
gold 
dollar. 


Coins. 


India 


Silver 


Rupee 


$0.35 


Gold : raohur ($7.10,5) . Silver : rupee 
and divisions. 


Italy 

Japan 


Gold and sil- 
ver. 

Gold and sil- 
ver.* 


Lira 

(Gold.... 
T °"-i Silver.. 


.19,3 

.99,7 

.79,3 


Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 liras. Sil- 
ver: 5 liras. 

Gold : 1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 yen. 

Silver: yen. 


Liberia 


Gold 


Dollar 


1.00 




Mexico 


Silver 


Dollar 


.80 


Gold: dollar ($0.98,3), 2£, 5, 10, and 
20 dollars. Silver : dollar (or peso) 
and divisions. 


Netherlands 


Gold and sil- 
ver. 


Florin 


.40,2 


Gold: 10 florins. Silver: J, 1, and 
2£ florins. 


Newfoundland 


Gold 


Dollar 


1.01,4 


Gold: 2 dollars ($2.02,7). 


Norway 


Gold 


Crown 


.26,8 


Gold : 10 ami 20 crowns. 


Peru 


Silver 


Sol 


.73,6 


Silver: sol and divisions. 


Portugal 


Gold 


Milreis 


1.08 


Gold: 1, 2, 5, and 10 milreis. 


Russia 


Silver 


Rouble 


.58,8 


Gold : imperial ($7.71,8), and £ impe- 
rial t($3.86). Silver: £, $, and 1 
rouble. 


Spain 


Gold and sil- 
ver. 


Peseta 


. 19, 3 


Gold: 25 pesetas. Silver: 5 pesetas. 


Sweden 


Gold 


Crown 


.26,8 


Gold : 10 and 20 crowns. 


Switzerland 


Gold and sil- 
ver. 


Franc 


.19,3 


Gold: 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 francs. 
Silver: 5 francs. 


Tripoli 


Silver 


Mahbub of 20 pi- 
asters. 


.66,4 




Turkey 


Gold 


Piaster 


.04,4 


Gold: 25, 50, 100, 250, and 500 pias- 
ters. 


Venezuela 


Silver 


Bolivar 


.14,7 


Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 bolivars. 
Silver: 5 bolivars. 



* Gold the nominal standard. Silver practically the standard, 
t Coined since January 1 , 1630. Old half imperial — $3.98, 0. 






64 



REPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Values of Foreign Coins, October 1 , 1891. 









Value 

in 




Country. 


Standard. 


Monetary unit. 


terms 

ofU.S. 


Coins. 








gold 

dollar. 




Argentine Republic. 


Gold and sil- 




$0. 96,5 


Gold: Argentine ($4.82,4) and £ Ar- 






ver. 






gentine. Silver: peso and divisions. 


Austria-Hungary . . . 




Florins 


.35,7 


Gold: 4 llorins ($1.92,9), 8 florins 














($3.85,8), ducat ($2.28,7), and 4 du- 
cats ($9.15,8). Silver: 1 and 2 
florins. 




Gold and sil- 
ver. 


Franc 


.19,3 


Gold: 10 and 20 francs. Silver: 5 
francs. 












.72,3 

.54,6 


Silver: Boliviano and divisions. 
Gold : 5, 10, and 20 milreis. Silver $, 
1, and 2 milreis. 




Gold 


Milreis 








British Possessions, 
N. A. (exceptNew- 


Gold 




1.00 










foundland). 
Central American 




States— 










Costa Rica 

Guatemala 




Peso 


.72,3 


Silver: peso and divisions. 


Nicaragua 

Salvador 










Chili 


Gold and sil- 
ver. 


Peso 


.91,2 


Gold: escudo ($1.82,4), doubloon 
($4.56,1), and condor ($9.12,3). Sil- 














ver: peso and divisions. 






[Shanghai . . 


1.06,8 




China 


Silver 


Tael .< H a i k w a n 


1.18,9 








[ (customs). 




Colombia 


Silver 


PC80 


.72,3 


Gold: condor ($9.64,7) and double 
condor. Silver: peso. 








Cuba 


Gold and sil- 


Peso 


.92,6 


Gold: doubloon ($5.01,7). Silver: 
peso. 




ver. 




Denmark 


Gold 


Crown 


.26,8 

.72,3 


Gold: 10 and 20 crowns. 


Ecuador 


Silver 


Sucre 


Gold: condor ($9.64,7) and double 
condor. Silver: sucre and divi- 
















sions. 


Ervnt 


Gold . . 


Pound (100 pias- 


4. 94,3 


Gold : pound (100 piasters), 50 pias- 











ters). 




ters, 20 piasters, 10 piasters, and 5 
piasters. Silver : 1,2, 5, 10, and 20 
piasters. 


Finland 


Gold 


Mark 


.19,3 


Gold : 20 marks ($3.85,9), 10 marks 
($1.93). 








France 


Gold and 


Franc 


.19,3 


Gold : 5, 10. 20, 50, and 100 francs. Sil- 
ver : 5 francs. 




silver. 




German Empire 

Great Britain 


Gold 


Mark 


.23,8 
4. 86, 6i 


Gold : 5, 10, and 20 marks. 

Gold: sovereign (pound sterling) 
and J sovereign. 


Gold 


Pound sterling . . 






Greece 


Gold and 


Drachma 


.19,3 


Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 drachmas. 
Silver: 5 drachmas. 




silver. 




Hayti 


Gold and 


Gourde 


.96,5 


Silver : gourde. 




silver. 





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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



65 



Values of Foreign Coins, October 1 , 1891— Continued. 



Country. 


Standard. 


Monetary unit. 


Value 

in 

terms 
of U. S. 
gold 
dollar. 


Coins. 

• 


India 


Silver 


Rupee 


$0. 34, 3 


Gold: mohur ($7.10,5). Silver: ru- 
pee and divisions. 


Italy 


Gold and 

silver. 

• 


Lira 

^ c Gold 


.19,3 

.99,7 


Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 liras. Sil- 
ver: 5 liras. 

Gold : 1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 yen. 


Japan 


Gold and 
silver. * 


Yen. \ 

( Silver 


.77,9 


Silver: yen. 


Liberia 


Gold 


Dollar 


1.00 




Mexico 


Silver 


Dollar 


.78,5 


Gold: dollar ($0.98,3), 2J, 5, 10, and 
20 dollars. Silver: dollar (or peso) 
and divisions. 


Netherlands 


Gold and 
silver. 


Florin 


.40,2 


Gold: 10 florins. Silver: 1, and 

2£ florins. 


Newfoundland 


Gold 


Dollar j 


1.01,4 


Gold: 2 dollars ($2.02,7). 


Norway 


Gold 


Crown j 


.26,8 


Gold : 10 and 20 crowns. 


Peru 


Silver 


Sol 1 


.72,3 


Silver: sol and divisions. 


Portugal 


Gold 


Milreis ■ 


1.08 


Gold : 1, 2, 5, and 10 milreis. 


Russia 


Silver 


Rouble ! 

i 


.57,8 


Gold : imperial ($7.71,8), and & impe- 
rial t($3.86). Silver: J, and 1 

rouble. 


Spain 


Gold and 
silver. 


Peseta 


.19,3 


Gold: 25 pesetas. Silver: 5 pesetas. 


Sweden 


Gold 


Crown 


.26,8 


Gold: 10 and 20 crowns. 


Switzerland 


Gold and 
silver. 


Franc 


.19,3 


Gold: 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 francs. 
Silver: 5 francs. 


Tripoli 


Silver 


Mahbub of 20 pi- 
asters. 


1 .65,2 




Turkey 


Gold 


Piaster 


.04,4 


Gold : 25, 50, 100, 250, and 500 piasters. 


Venezuela 


Silver 


Bolivar 


,14,5 


Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 bolivars. 
Silver: 5 bolivars. 



* Gold the nominal standard. Silver practically the standard, 
t Coined since January 1, 1886. Old half-imperial = $3.98, 6. 



In estimating the value of foreign coins the same practice has been 
followed as heretofore. The value of the monetary unit of countries 
having a gold or double standard was ascertained by comparing the 
amount of pure gold in such unit with the pure gold in the United 
States dollar, and the silver coins of such countries were given the same 
valuation as the corresponding gold coins with which they are inter- 
changeable by law. 

In countries having a silver standard, the values of the silver coins 
were fixed at the commercial value of the pure silver contained in such 
coins. 

10285 m 5 



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66 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



SPECIAL TESTS OF COINS. 

The regulations governing the mint service provide for special assays 
of current coinage of the mints, as follows: 

Seo. 9. From the first and two subsequent deliveries in each week of gold and 
silver coins of ea^h denomination of coin delivered by the coiner, specimen pieces, 
two in number, shall he taken, certified, and inclosed by the superintendent and 
assayer in the same manner as above prescribed for trial by the annual assay commis- 
sion, when they shall be promptly forwarded to the Director of the Mint by regis- 
tered mail for assay by the assayer of the Bureau of the Mint. 

Sec. 10. The value of the special assay coins shall be returned at the end of each 
six months (June 30 and December 31) to the proper mints. 

In order to enable the Director to know from day to day that the 
coins being issued at the mints conform in all respects to the require- 
ments of law, a laboratory was established in 1878 on the fourth floor 
of the Treasury Department, which has proved a valuable adjunct to 
the Bureau. 

Special examinations are also made in the laboratory, for the Treasury 
Department, of coins and other material for the purpose of detecting 
and preventing counterfeiting, and for custom requirements. 

During the calendar year 1890 there were tested in the laboratory of 
this Bureau 196 gold coins and 1,010 silver coins, all of which were 
found to be within the legal requirements in regard to weight, fineness, 
and mechanical perfection. 

Tables will be found in the appendix showing the fineness of the 
coins assayed and the percentage of coins of various degrees of fine- 
ness. 



ANNUAL TRIAL OF COINS. 

The following commissioners were appointed under the provisions of 
section 3547 of the Revised Statutes, to test the weight and fineness of 
the gold and silver coins of the coinage of the calendar year 1890, reserved 
for that purpose by the coinage mints, viz: Hon. Nelson W. Aldrich, 
United States Senate ; Hon. Thomas H. Carter, House of Representatives ; 
Messrs. B. A. Gould, Massachusetts; Cabell Whitehead, Virginia; Nel- 
son F. Evans, Pennsylvania; Frank A. Leach, California; G. R. Metten, 
Montana; John H. Appleton, Rhode Island; C. W. Moore, Idaho; E. S. 
Willcox, Illinois; Irwin Shepard, Minnesota; H. W. Cannon, New 
York; J. M. Bailey, jr., South Dakota; W. D. Ewing, Indiana; Charles 
W. Pavey, Illinois; Daniel M. Houser, Missouri. 

The Commission met in Philadelphia on February 11, 1891, with the 
exception of Hon. N. W. Aldrich and W. D. Ewing, all of the commis- 
sioners appointed being present, together with the following ex officio 
commissioners: Hon. William Butler, United States judge for the 
eastern district of Pennsylvania, Hon. E. S. Lacey, Comptroller of the 
Currency, and Herbert G. Torrey, assayer of the United States assay 
office at New York, 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



67 



The committee on counting reported: 

The packages containing the pieces reserved by the several mints for the trial of 
coins, in accordance with section 3539, Revised Statutes, were delivered to us by the 
superintendent of the mint at Philadelphia. 

The number of coins corresponded with the record kept by the Director of the 
Mint, of aU transcripts sent him by the several superintendents. 

The coins reserved were as follows: 

Pieces Reserved for Annual Test, 1890. 



Mints. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


GOLD. 


167 

804 


$2,357.50 

16,080.00 








165 


2, 310.00 


SILVER. 

Philadelphia 


1,136 


20,747.50 


13,416 

4,831 

5,351 

1,155 


8,915.25 
4, 189. 30 

5.351.00 

1.155.00 


San Francisco 


New Orleans 


Carson 




Total gold and silver 


| 24,753 


19,610.55 


! 25,889 

1 


40,358.05 



The committee on assaying reported : 

No coin among those examined was found to deviate from the standard fixed by 
law beyond the legal tolerance, but they were in all cases far within the legal al- 
lowance. 

The committee on weighing reported: 

The committee on weighing pronounces the examination of the weights of the 
coinage of the several mints during the year 1890 to be satisfactory. 

The result of the annual test is contained in the following resolution 
adopted by the Commission: 

Resolved , That the Assay Commission, having examined and tested the reserved 
coins of the several mints for the year 1890, and it appearing that these coins do not 
differ from the standard fineness and weight by a greater quantity than is aUowed 
by law, the trial is considered and reported satisfactory. 



CHANGES IN REGULATIONS. 



On the 28th of September, 1891, an order was issued, approved by 
the Secretary of the Treasury, increasing the charge for small gold bars 
at the United States assay office at New York from 4 to 5 cents per 
hundred dollars in value. 

Heretofore it has been the practice to charge 4 cents per hundred 
dollars in value for the manufacture of fine gold bars, and to give de- 



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68 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



positors, in payment of their deposits, gold bars as nearly approximat- 
ing the value of their deposits as possible, the smallest being about 
$5,000 in value. 

In many cases these bars were redeposited for small bars for jewelry 
and manufacturing purposes, and it has been customary to charge for 
this exchange, that is, for furnishing small gold bars in the place of 
large ones, the same amount as the original bar charge, 4 cents per hun- 
dred dollars in value. 

Under the new regulations small gold bars will be furnished depos- 
itors originally when they desire it, and the charge will be 1 cent more 
per hundred dollars in value than for large bars, to cover the additional 
cost of manufacturing small bars. 

On the 29th of September, 1891, the following regulation was issued: 

In cases of deposits of foreign gold coin or foreign gold bars at the United States 
assay office at New York, such approximation of the value of the bullion delivered 
as, in the discretion of the Superintendent, may be regarded safe and proper, not to 
exceed 90 per cent of the value, will be paid, pending melt and assay. 

The purpose of this regulation was to encourage the importation of 
foreign gold by allowing depositors approximate spot cash value for 
foreign gold as soon as received at the counter of the assay office, thus 
saving interest on the value of the deposit pending melt and assay. 



NEW DESIGNS OF UNITED STATES COINS. 



In my last annual report attention was directed to the inelegance of 
the designs upon some of the coins of the United States and the ab- 
sence of any authority of law to change an existing design. 

The following bill, introduced at my request in the Fifty-first Cong- 
ress, and which met with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, 
became a law September 26, 1890 : 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America 
in Congress assembled , That section thirty-five hundred and ten of the Revised Stat- 
utes of the United States be, and the same is hereby, amended so as to read as fol- 
lows : 

“ Sec. 3510. The engraver shall prepare from the original dies already authorized 
all the working dies required for use in the coinage of the several mints, and, when 
new coins, emblems, devices, legends, or designs are authorized, shaU, if re- 
quired by the Director of the Mint, prepare the devices, models, hubs, or original 
dies for the same. The Director of the Mint shall have power, with the approval of 
the Secretary of the Treasury, to cause new designs or models of authorized emblems 
or devices to be prepared and adopted in the same manner as when new coins or de- 
vices are authorized. But no change in the design or die of any coin shall be made 
oftener than once in twenty-five years from and including the year of the first 
adoption of the design, model, die, or hub for the same coin: Provided , That no 
change be made in the diameter of any coin: And provided further , That nothing in 
this section shall prevent the adoption of new designs or models for devices or em- 
blems already authorized for the standard silver dollar and the five-cent nickel piece as 
soon as practicable after the passage of this act. But the Director of the Mint shall, 
nevertheless, have power, with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, to en- 



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■REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



69 



gage temporarily for this purpose the services of one or more artists, distinguished in 
their respective departments of art, who shall be paid for such service from the con- 
tingent appropriation for the mint at Philadelphia." 

Approved, September 26, 1890. 

In pursuance of the authority contained in this act, the following cir- 
cular was addressed to artists and relief designers in the United States 
inviting designs for the obverse and reverse of the silver dollar, and 
for the obverse only of the half dollar, quarter dollar, and dime, and 
offering a reward not to exceed $500 for each design accepted. 

CIRCULAR LETTER TO ARTISTS. 

Treasury Department, Bureau of the Mint, 

Washington, D. C., April 4 , 1891. 

Under the provisions of the act of September 26, 1890, authorizing the Director of 
the Mint, with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, to cause new designs 
or models of authorized emblems or devices to be prepared and adopted for the coins 
of the United States, it has been decided to invite designs for the obverse and reverse 
of the silver dollar, and for the obverse only of the half dollar, quarter doUar, and 
dime. 

The foUowing are the conditions under which designs will be considered : 

1. They must be presented in the form of models or medallions in plaster, the 
models to be from 4 to 8 inches in diameter ; a separate design to be submitted for 
the obverse and reverse of the silver dollar, and separate designs for the obverse of 
the half dollar, quarter dollar, and dime. 

2. The models must be in what is known as “low relief," suitable for coins. 

3. Each model submitted must be complete, with the denomination of the coin, 
and only such inscriptions as are required by law, together with the date (year). 

4. The models must be submitted under seal to the Director of the Mint on or 
before June 1, 1891. 

5. An award not to exceed $500 will be made for each design accepted. 

FuU facilities will he afforded at the Mint at Philadelphia to artists who may desire 
to examine coins belonging to the cabinet of that institution. 

The folowing is a list of the coins for which new designs are proposed, with the 
diameter and thickness of each : 

Diameter and Thickness of the Following Silver Coins. 



Denominations. 


Diameter 
(20ths of an 
inch). 


Thickness 
(l,000ths of an 
inch). 


Standard dollar 


30 


80 


Half dollar 


24 


57 


Quarter dollar 


19 


45 


Dime 


14 


32 





Extracts from the laws prescribing the devices and legends are attached hereto. 
Very respectfully, 

Edward O. Leech, 
Director of the Mint. 

Approved: 

Charles Foster, 

Secretary of the Treasury . 



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70 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



STATUTORY LAWS IN RESPECT TO THE DEVICES AND EMBLEMS UPON THE COINS OP 

THE UNITED STATES. 



Sec. 3517, R. S. Upon the coins there shall be the following devices and legends : 
Upon one side there shall he an impression emblematic of liberty, with an inscrip- 
tion of the word “ Liberty ” and the year of the coinage, and upon the reverse shall 
be the figure or representation of an eagle, with the inscriptions “ United States of 
America” and “E Pluribus Unum,” and a designation of the value of the coin; hut 
on the gold dollar and three-dollar piece, the dime, five, three, and one cent piece, 
the figure of the eagle shall be omitted. 

(Applicable to the half dollar, quarter dollar, and dime.) 

Sec. 13, act approved January 18, 1837. That upon the coins struck at the Mint 
there shall be the following devices and legends : Upon one side of each of said coins 
there shall he an impression emblematic of liberty, with an inscription of the word 
“Liberty” and the year of the coinage; and upon the reverse of each of the gold 
and silver coins there shall be the figure or representation of an eagle, with the in- 
scription “United States of America,” and a designation of the value of the coin; 
hut on the reverse of the dime and half dime, cent and half cent, the figure of the 
eagle shall be omitted. 

(Applicable to the silver dollar.) 

Sec. 18, act approved February 12, 1873. The Director of the Mint, with the ap- 
proval of the Secretary of the Treasury, may cause the motto “In God we trhst ” 
to he inscribed upon such coins as shall admit of such motto, and any of the forego- 
ing inscriptions may he on the rim of the gold and silver coins. 

Note. — The motto “In God we trust” will he inscribed upon the silver dollar, 
the half dollar, and quarter dollar, hut not upon the dime. ' 

By invitation of the Secretary of the Treasury the following gentle- 
men met in the office of the Director of the Mint, in Washington, on 
June 3, 1891, and passed upon the designs submitted, viz : Augustus 
St. Gaudens, sculptor, of Few York City; Henry Mitchell, engraver, of 
Boston, and Charles E. Barber, engraver, United States Mint at Phil- 
adelphia. 

The following is the report of the committee : 



Treasury Department, 

Bureau of the Mint, 
Washington , D. C., June 3, 1891. 

Dear Sir: We would respectfully report that in conformity with your written 
request we have opened in the presence of the Director of the Mint the new designs 
or models submitted for the silver coins of the United States, under Department cir- 
cular of April 4, 1891, and have carefully examined the same. 

We are of the opinion that none of the designs or models submitted are such a de- 
cided improvement upon the present designs of the silver coins of the United States 
as to be worthy of adoption by the Government. 

We would respectfully recommend that the services of one or more artists distin- 
guished for work in designing for relief be engaged at a suitable compensation to 
prepare for the consideration of the Department new designs for the coins of the 
United States. 

Very respectfully, 

Henry Mitchell. 

Augustus St. Gaudens. 

• Chas. E. Barber. 

I concur in the findings. 

Edward 0. Leecit, 

Director. 



Hon. Charles Foster, 
Secretary of the Ti'easury. 



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New designs for the subsidary coins — the half dollar, quarter dollar 
and dime — have been prepared, under my direction, by Mr. Charles E. 
Barber, the engraver of the mint at Philadelphia, and with your ap- 
proval have been adopted. 

The consideration of the subject of changing the designs upon our 
coins naturally calls forth some thought upon the subject of coinage 
generally, a subject full of interest. 

Coinage may be defined as consisting m the division of a monetary 
metal into pieces of uniform dimensions and weight, and in the stamp- 
ing of them by public authority, in order to certify the quantity of fine 
metal contained in each; while a coin is one of the pieces so stamped. 

Coinage is of very great antiquity. Its invention is generally as- 
cribed to Pheidon of Argos, who reigned in the eighth century before 
Christ. 

When we consider the great antiquity of some of the coins now in a 
perfect state of preservation, dating back many hundred years before 
the birth of Christ, they open a vast field of thought. 

These metallic monuments, having the portraits and names of the 
great heroes of the age in which they were struck, bear unequivocal 
witness to the truth of the historical records which have come down to 
us, and from which we learn of the wars, religions, and superstitions 
of past ages. 

The earliest specimens of coins of which we have knowledge bore the 
impression of a die only on the face, the reverse showing the marks of 
the rude punch used to force the piece of metal into the die. Following 
this, the first improvement seems to have "been an attempt to make the 
punch conform somewhat to the shape of the die. 

This improvement was carried on until we find the punch almost 
identical with the design of the die, the result being coins with an im- 
pression in relief on one side and an intaglio on the other, or f as these 
pieces are called, incused coins. 

This was a great step in coinage and contributed largely to the pro- 
duction of the high relief which we find in antique coins. After these 
come the coins with separate designs for both the obverse (or face) and 
reverse (or back), both sides telling their story; in many cases beauti- 
fully executed, considered as works of art. 

The idea of relief and abrasion was never considered in connection 
with antique coinage. The artist indulged his fancy and taste to the 
fullest extent, and the coins were struck as medals are now, without re- 
gard to the amount of pressure required or the number of blows from 
the hammer or press necessary to perfect the impression in high relief. 

The coins of antiquity were for the most part like those of modern 
times, round, the form best suited to them. Quadrangular, hexagonal, 
and octagonal, spherical, and spheroid pieces were seldom employed 
even then. 

The names of the oldest coins known, and of many modem ones, 



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point to the connection existing between coins and their weight. Tims 
the ancient as well as the modern Greek drachma, the pound sterling 
in England, the pfund in Germany, the livre in France, the lira in 
Italy. 

During historical times and in civilized countries, since the first in- 
vention of coinage, gold and silver have been employed whenever gov- 
ernments were rich enough to obtain them, almost exclusively, in the 
manufacture of all save token coins. Eussia at one time coined platina, 
but as that substance was not well adapted for coinage purposes the 
stamping of it was stopped and the pieces issued retired by the Gov- 
ernment of the Czar. 

The beauty of their appearance, hardness, malleability, susceptibility 
to the receiving of an impression, fusibility, homogeneity, divisibility, 
rarity, and the relative stability of their value, during limited periods 
of time, are the qualities that have insured the choice of gold and silver 
as the monetary metals of the world during so many centuries, and in 
all countries in which they have been obtainable, either by mining or 
in exchange for other objects of value. 

With the growth of technical knowledge, and in order to meet the 
increased demands of trade, a proportion of base metal was early added 
to the gold or silver, and coins now are universally manufactured with 
an alloy of copper. 

The object of mixing gold and silver with a proportion of some other 
metal, generally copper, in coinage, is to give the pieces greater resist- 
ance to wear and tear. This proportion is called the alloy. The pro- 
portion of pure metal in the coin is called its fineness. The proportion 
of alloy should not be allowed to exceed certain limits. 

Michel Chevalier laid it down as a rule that that proportion of alloy 
was best which gave the precious metals the greatest resistance to 
friction. Experience has shown that Chevalier’s rule should be modi- 
fied thus: The best alloy in coinage is that which, in the higher fine- 
nesses, offers the greatest resistance to abrasion . It has been clearly 
demonstrated that the proportion of nine parts of gold or silver to one 
part of copper best accomplishes this result. 

The multiples or submultiples of the monetary unit should be such 
as to render it easy for the public to make up any sum out of the pieces 
issued by the Government. They should be of such weight and size as 
to make their use convenient, and to reduce to a minimum the action 
of abrasion and the possibility of alteration. 

The mechanical part of the manufacture of coins at the present day 
is all that can be desired. The same, however, can not be said of the 
artistic part of the coinage. 

To help make the coins of the United States worthy, from the point 
of view of the beautiful, of our country, at the beginning of the second 
century of its existence, is the object of my recommendations as to new 
and improved designs. 



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In modern coinage the designs in monarchal governments consist, as 
u- rule, of the portrait of the sovereign for its obverse and the coat of 
arms or seal for the reverse, thus simplifying the question of design. 
Republican nations have generally ignored the idea of having the por- 
trait of their Chief Magistrate upon their coins, but have generally 
used some ideal head or representative; hence our coinage laws pre- 
scribe, u Upon one side there shall be an impression emblematic of lib- 
erty, with an inscription of the word 4 Liberty ? * * * and upon 
the reverse shall be the figure or representation of an eagle.” 

The design first adopted was a female head representing liberty for 
the obverse and an eagle for the reverse. 

Without reviewing all the changes which have taken place in the de- 
signs upon our coins it may be interesting, now that a change in the 
designs upon our subsidiary silver coins (the half dollar, quarter dollar 
and dime) has been decided upon, to enumerate the changes which 
have been made in these particular pieces. 

The present obverse of the subsidiary coins first appeared on the 
dollar of 1836, dime and half dime of 1837, half dollar and quarter dol- 
lar of 1838, and all the silver coins of 1840. It was designed by Sulley 
and engraved by Mr. Christian Gobrecht. The present reverse, with 
the exception of some minor differences, first appeared on the half dollar 
of 1807, dime of 1809, quarter dollar of 1815, and half dime of 1829. The 
dies were prepared by Mr. John Reich, who was appointed assistant 
engraver in 1807 by the Director of the Mint, Robert Patterson. 

FULL DESCRIPTION OF TIIE TYPES AND VARIETIES OF THE HALF DOLLAR, FROM THE 
YEAR OF ITS FIRST ISSUE ( 1794 ) TO THE PRESENT TIME. 

Authorized to be coined, act of April 2, 1792; weight, 208 grains; 
fineness, 892.4. Fineness changed, act of January 18, 1837, to 900. 
Weight changed, act of February 21, 1853, to 192 grains, and again by 
act of February 12, 1873 to 12£ grams or 192.9 grains. 

1794- , 95. Obverse : Liberty head facing right, flowing hair, 15 stars; 
above, 44 Liberty;” beneath, the date. Reverse: An eagle with raised 
wings, encircled by branches of laurel, 44 United States of America.” On 
the edge, 44 Fifty cents or half a dollar.” Size, 21. 

1796- ? 97. Obverse: Bust of Liberty, facing right, hair bound by a 
ribbon, shoulders draped, 15 stars. Some were struck with 16 stars. 
Reverse: An eagle with expanded wings standing upon clouds, within 
a wreath of palm and laurel; 44 United States of America.” 1797, same, 
with 16 stars. 

1798 to 1800, inclusive; none coined. 

1801 to 1806 inclusive. Obverse: Same. Reverse: The heraldic eagle 
bearing the United States shield upon its breast; in beak a scroll in- 
scribed 44 E Pluribus Unum.” A bundle of 13 arrows in the right talon 
and an olive branch in the left; above are clouds and 13 stars; 44 United 
Sta tes of America.” 



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REPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OP THE MINT. 



1807. No. 1, same. No. 2. Obverse, Liberty head facing left, wear- 
ing a cap shaped like a turban, with “ Liberty ” inscribed on the band ; 
thirteen stars and date. Reverse : An eagle with expanded wings point- 
ing downwards, bearing upon its breast the United States shield, and 
olive branch in its right talon and 3 arrows in its left; above, in the 
field, a scroll inscribed “ E Pluribus Unum;” beneath “ 50 C,” legend; 
“ United States of America.” 

1808 to 1815, inclusive, same as No. 2 of 1807. 

1816, none coined. 

1817 to 1835, inclusive, same as No. 2 of 1807. 

1836. No. 1, same as No. 2 of 1807. No. 2. Obverse: Same. Re- 
verse: Same, with reeded edge, the omission of the motto 66 E Pluribus 
Unum;” “ 50 cents” for “ 50 O.” and size 19. 

1837. Same as No. 2 of 1836. 

1838. No. 1. Obverse same as No. 2 of 1836. Reverse, same; u half 
dol.” for “50 cents.” No. 2. Obverse: Liberty seated upon a rock, 
supporting with her right hand the United States shield, across which 
floats a scroll inscribed “ Liberty,” and with her left hand the staff and 
Liberty cap ; beneath, the date. Reverse same as No. 1. 

1839 to 1852, inclusive, same as No. 2 of 1838. 

1853. Obverse : Same with, an arrow on each side of date. Reverse : 
Same, with a halo of rays around the eagle. 

1854 and 1855, same, without the rays. 

1856 to 1865, same, without arrow heads. 

1866 to 1872, same, with a scroll above the eagle inscribed “ In God 
we trust.” 

1873. No. 1, same. No. 2, same, with an arrow head on each side of 
the date. 

1874. Same. 

1875 to the present date, same, without the arrow heads. 



QUARTER DOLLAR. 



Authorized to be coined, act of April 2, 1792; weight, 104 grains; fine- 
ness, 892.4. Weight changed, act of January 18, 1837, to 103J grains. 
Fineness changed, act of January 18, 1837, to 900. Weight changed, act 
of February 21, 1853, to 96 grains, and weight changed to 6J grams 
or 96.45 grains by the act of February 12, 1873. 

1796 same, type as half dollar. 

1797 to 1803, inclusive, none coined, 

1804 to 1807, same as half dollar of 1801. 

1808 to 1814, none coined. 

1815, same as No. 2 half dollar of 1807. 

1816 and 1817, none coined. 

1818 to 1825, same as No. 2 half dollar of 1807. 

1829 and 1830, none coined. 

1831 to 1837, same as No. 2 half dollar of 1807, with the diameter rer 



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duced from size 17 to size 15 and a corresponding increase in the thick- 
ness and decrease in the size of devices; the omission of the scroll in- 
scribed u E Plttribus Unum.” 

1838. No. 1, same: No. 2, same as half dollar of 1839* 

1839 to the present time, same as the half dollar. 

DIME. 



Authorized to-be coined, act of April 2, 1792; weight, 41.6 grains; 
fineness, 892.4. Weight changed, act of January 18, 1837, to 41J grains, 
and fineness changed by the same act to 900. The weight was again 
changed, act of February 12, 1873, to 2£ grams, or 38.58 grains. 

1796, same type as half dollar. 

1797. No. 1, same, with 16 stars; No. 2, same, with 13 stars. 

1798. No. 1, same type as half dollar of 1801 with 16 stars; No. 2, 
same, with 13 stars. 

1799, none coined. 

1800 to 1805, inclusive, same. 

1806, none coined. 

1807, same type as half dollar of 1801. 

1808, none coined. 

1809, same type as half dollar of 1807. 

1810, none coined. 

1811, same type as half dollar of 1807. 

1812 and 1813, none coined. 

1814, same type as half dollar of 1807. 

1815 to 1819, none coined. 

1820 to 1825, same type as half dollar of 1807. 

1826, none coined. 

1827 to 1836, same type as half dollar of 1807. 

1837. No. 1, same. No. 2. Obverse: Liberty seated; no stars. Re- 
verse: “One dime” within a wreath of laurel; “ United States ot 
America.” 

1838 No. 1 same as No. 2 dime of 1837. No. 2 same, with thirteen 
stars. 

1839 to 1852 same. 

1853 No. 1 same. No. 2 same, with an arrow on each side of the date. 

1854 and 1855 same. 

1856 to 1859 same, without arrowheads. 

1860 to 1872. Obverse: Same, with “ United States of America” in- 
stead of stars. Reverse: u One dime” within a wreath of cereals. 

1873 No. 1 same. No. 2 same, with an arrowhead on each side of the 
date. 



1874 same. 

1875 to present time same, without arrowheads. 

The new designs which have been adopted for the subsidiary coins 



may be briefly described as follows : On the obverse is a female head, 

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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



representative of liberty, looking’ right, expression calm and dignified, 
with olive wreath around the head and Phrygian cap on back. On a 
band over front of head the word u Liberty/ 7 and over the head the 
motto 4 In God we trust”; around the medallion are thirteen stars, 
and under, the date of coinage. On the reverse appears the seal of the 
United States as adopted 1782, and is thus described: An eagle dis- 
played, charged on the breast with a shield argent, six pallets gules, a 
chief azure, holding in the dexter claw an olive branch of thirteen leaves ; 
in the sinister claw a sheaf of thirteen arrows; in the beak a scroll with 
the motto “E Pluribus Unum,” ensigned above and about the head 
with thirteen stars. This will be the design of the half dollar and 
quarter dollar, while the dime will have for obverse same head as half 
dollar and quarter dollar, but in place of the stars the inscription 
“ United States of America,” while the motto “In God we trust” will 
be omitted. The reverse of the dime will be the same as in present use. 

From the description given of the coins of the early issue of this Gov- 
ernment it will be seen that the first-described reverse which it is pro- 
posed to supersede the old with is a return to the design of almost the 
first coinage. It has often been said that the design of our early coin- 
age was superior to some more modem. This would seem a case in 
point, as what can be more appropriate for the design of a coin than 
the great seal, carrying with it, as it undoubtedly does, the mark of its 
genuineness and worth. 

As the volume of coinage in modern time is so vast, great numbers 
of dies are required, and as the work of engraving a die is of necessity 
a slow and tedious process and would be sure to have some variations if 
each separate die was engraved, hubs are made from which the work- 
ing dies are transferred, thus making it possible to produce a large num- 
ber of dies in a comparatively short time, and also insure perfect simi- 
larity. The question, What is a hub? is sure to arise in the minds of 
many. A hub is a piece of tempered steel, on which is the perfect de- 
sign in relief of the coin it represents. This hub being hard can be 
forced by great pressure into a finely annealed piece of steel, thus pro- 
ducing a die for coinage. The work of producing a new coin or series 
of coins is a very delicate operation. First a design is suggested, then 
models are made, molds are then prepared and electrotypes are made. 
The question of curve to be given the face of the die is very important, 
as this varies with each coin and requires careful adjustment to area and 
design. Although modern coins look flat, the fact is quite the contrary, 
as none are so, they being struck from dies the surface of which is al- 
ways curved. From the electrotypes reductions are made by a beauti- 
ful machine most delicate in its actions. These reduced copies of the 
model are in steel and require the skill of the engraver to give them the 
delicate finish^that coins are expected to have. The engraving depart- 
ment ofthe United States Mint is at present employing all its energy to 
have the dies with the new designs ready by January 1, 1892. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



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THE NEW MINT AT PHILADELPHIA. 

In my last fiscal report, as well as in the last report of the Secretary 
of the Treasury, attention was directed to the crowded condition of the 
building now occupied bythe Mint of the United States at Philadelphia, 
and the inadequacy of the present ground area for the erection of a 
suitable building, and the sale of the present site and the purchase of a 
new site and the erection of a suitable building for the mint at Phila- 
delphia, was strongly recommended. 

On January 6, 1890, a bill (H. B. 3910) was introduced in the House 
of Bepresentatives by Hon. H. H. Bingham, of Philadelphia, providing 
for the purchase of a new site and the erection of anew building for the 
mint at Philadelphia. 

On May 2, 1890, the following bill (H. E. 9957), introduced by the 
same member for the same purpose, was substituted for the bill origi- 
nally introduced by him : 



A BILL to provide for the purchase of a site and the erection of a public building thereon at Phila- 
delphia, in the State of Pennsylvania. 



Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Bepresentatives of the United States of America 
in Congress assembled, That the Secretary of the Treasury he, and he is hereby, au- 
thorized and directed to acquire, by purchase, condemnation, or otherwise, a site and 
cause to be erected thereon a suitable building, including fire-proof vaults, heating 
and ventilating apparatus, elevators, and approaches, for the use and accommodation 
of the United States Mint, in the city of Philadelphia, and State of Pennsylvania, the 
cost of said site and building, including said vaults, heating and ventilating appa- 
ratus, elevators, and approaches, complete, not to exceed the sum of two million 
dollars. . 

So much of the appropriation as may be necessary to defray traveling expenses and 
other expenses incident to the selection of the site, and for necessary survey thereof, 
shall be immediately available. 

So much of said appropriation as may be necessary for the preparation of sketch 
plans, drawings, specifications, and detailed estimates for the building by the Su- 
pervising Architect of the Treasury Department shall be available immediately upon 
the selection of the site by the Secretary of the Treasury. 

No money appropriated shall be available, except as hereinbefore provided, until a 
valid title to the site for said building shall be vested in the United States, nor until 
the State of Pennsylvania shall have ceded to the United States exclusive jurisdic- 
tion over the same during the time the United States shall' be or remain the owner 
thereof, for all purposes except the administration of the criminal laws of said State 
and the service of civil process therein. 

After the said site shall have been paid for and the sketch-plans and detailed draw- 
ings for the buildings shall have been prepared by the Supervising Architect, and 
approved by the Secretary of the Treasury and Director of the Mint, the balance of 
appropriation shall be available for the erection and completion of the building, in- 
cluding fire-proof vaults, heating and ventilating apparatus, elevators, and ap- 
proaches, and such balance of the appropriation as may remain available after the 
building shall have been completed shall be applied to and used in the purchase of 
apparatus for the purposes of the mint. 

The building shall be uuexposed to danger from fire by an open space of at least 
forty feet on each side, including streets and alleys. 

That the Secretary of the Treasury be, and he is hereby, further directed, wheu 



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REPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



the new building herein authorized to be erected shall have been completed, to die* 
pose of the present United States Mint building in the city of Philadelphia and State 
of Pennsylvania, at private or public sale, and to give a quit-claim deed to the pur- 
chaser thereof, and to deposit the proceeds of the sale to the credit of the Treasurer 
of the United States in the manner prescribed by sections thirty-six hundred and 
seventeen and thirty-six hundred and eighteen, United States Revised Statutes. 

The original bill (H. B. 3910) having been referred by the Committee 
on Public Buildings and Grounds to the Treasury Department for re- 
port, the following communications from the Secretary of the Treasury, 
the Director of the Mint, and the Supervising Architect of the Treasury 
were transmitted to the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds 
on February 18, 1890: 

Treasury Department, Office of the Secretary, 

Washington, D. C., February 18, 1890, 

Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a letter from the Committee 
on Public Buildings and Grounds, asking for the views of the Department upon bill 
H. R. 3910, a copy of which is inclosed, providing for the purchase of a site and the 
erection of a new building for the mint at Philadelphia. 

In reply, I desire to call attention to the statements made in the accompanying 
papers from the Director of the Mint, the Supervising Architect, and the principal 
mint officers at Philadelphia, showing the total inadequacy of the present quarters 
and setting forth specifically the reasons, which are apparent to those most familiar 
with the subject, for an enlargement of the present facilities for coining purposes. 
Every consideration bearing upon an effective and correct working of the mint serv- 
ice points to the necessity of providing at once a sufficient and suitable building. 
While our legislators of over half a century ago no doubt attempted to make provi- 
sion for the then immediate future, they never for a moment intended to erect a build- 
ing which would accommodate itself to the needs and purposes of the present time, 
when the number of .coins struck at this particular mint is eight times as great as it 
was then. Every department of the building is crowded to its utmost capacity with 
machinery and employes. It is impossible to put in force systematic methods, and 
much confusion and delay are occasioned by the want of space in which to arrange, in 
an orderly and natural relation, the several processes of the different operations 
through which the metal has to go in order to produce the perfect coin. The very 
limited area that can be assigned to the furnaces and other branches requiring the 
employment of artificial heat makes the temperature at all times almost unbearable, 
and the upper floor, the ceiling of which is in close proximity to the roof, is filled 
with lady operatives, who in the summer find in the stifled condition of the atmos- 
phere abundant cause for absence and ill health. 

Upon a recent personal inspection of the premises I was fully convinced of the 
serious difficulties under which all the employes labored, and I am sure that anyone 
who visits the mint can not fail to be impressed in the same way. In this connec- 
tion I beg to refer to the recommendation of the assay commission in resolutions here- 
with transmitted. The members of this commission were gentlemen of high profes- 
sional attainments and prominent in matters kindred to coinage. They have made 
manifest the results of their personal observations and have unanimously expressed 
the opinion that the only remedy for the present disabilities lies in the erection of a 
more spacious building. An appropriation from last year is available for the en- 
largement of the present building, but it would be very doubtful economy, if not 
altogether waste, to expend any large amount in attempting to make the present 
structure meet the requirements of the service. The walls are of marble, very heavy, 
and cover nearly all of the ground at that point which belongs to the Government. 
The heavy machinery and large amount of metal to he handled, as well as the deli- 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT, 



79 



cate operations connected with the finer work of coinage, makes it impracticable to 
nse a building many stories in height, and it is very doubtful if any good results 
would follow the ‘placing of additional stories on the present building. Good pub- 
lic policy at once suggests facilities to be had only in a building of ample propor- 
tions, and I most earnestly recommend the subject to the favorable consideration of 
Congress. I think it would be better, however, to amend the proposed bill in such a 
way as to make a specific appropriation of $2,000,000 to purchase a site and erect 
the building, and after it is finished to provide for the sale of the present site and 
building, the proceeds of such sale to be covered into the Treasury under the head 
of “ Miscellaneous receipts.” 

Respectfully, yours, 

William Windom, 



Hon. S. L. Miliken, 

Chairman of Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds, 

House of Representatives . 



Treasury Department, Bureau of the Mint, 

Washington , D. C., February 7, 1890. 

Sir: Referring to House bill 3910, authorizing the sale of the present site of the 
mint at Philadelphia and the purchase of a new site, and the erection of a new build- 
ing for the mint in that city, I have the honor to present herewith my views in re- 
gard to the necessity and expediency of enacting the same into law. 

The act establishing the Mint of the United States was approved by President 
Washington, April 2, 1792. The same year the structure for the mint, a plain brick 
edifice, was erected on Seventh street near Arch, in the city of Philadelphia. The 
following October the building was occupied for coinage purposes, and was so used 
for a period of over forty years. This was the first public building erected in the 
United States under the authority of the Federal Government. 

By act of May 19, 1829, the mint was permanently located in Philadelphia, and the 
present mint edifice, which stands at the comer of Chestnut and Juniper streets, on a 
lot fronting 150 feet on Chestnut street and extending back 204 feet to Penn Square, 
was authorized. The cornerstone was laid July 4, 1829, and the building was com- 
pleted and occupied for coinage purposes in 1833. This building has been used con- 
tinuously, without any material enlargement, for a period of fifty-seven years, as the 
principal coinage institution of the United States, although the growth and coinage 
requirements of the country have long since outgrown its capacity. It will be re- 
membered that this building was planned and erected twenty years before the discov- 
ery of gold in California and nearly forty years before the immense silver discoveries 
of Nevada. The product of the precious metals in the United States in 1833 was in- 
significant, the total product for the ten years 1834- 44 being only $7,750,000. The 
present product approximates annually $100,000,000. 

The coinage executed at the mint in 1833 was 10,370,700 pieces of the value, of 
$3,765,710; the coinage of the same institution for the last calendar year (1889) ag- 
gregated 94,012,194 pieces, of the value of $24,804,854.84. 

In addition to the coinage of gold and silver in common with the other mints of 
the United States, the mint at Philadelphia is the only institution in the United 
States authorized by law to execute minor coinage, the demand for which has become 
so pressing that for several years past the Government has been obliged to buy the 
blanks ready for stamping, and for several months past nine large presses have been 
used exclusively in the stamping of minor coin. 

Moreover, the mint at Philadelphia is the only one in the country whioh has con- 
nected with it an engraving department, where, by statutory requirement, the de* 



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RKPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



vices for our corns are engraved, and the dies, both original and working, for all 
our mints are made, and medals of a national character are executed. 

The building was not planned with any idea of adaptation for many of the me- 
chanical and metallurgical operations at present carried on in it. When it was 
erected many of the processes of metallurgy now employed were unknown. The 
area in the center of the mint, originally intended for a stack through which the 
fumes of acid, smoke, etc., could pass off, is now tilled to the very roof with wooden 
structures, which are not only objectionable in themselves, but increase the liability 
to tire, and take away ventilation and light, while the erection in the immediate 
vicinity of much higher buildings prevents the free escape of the fumes from the 
acid refinery, to the great annoyance of the public. 

The process of striking coin was by the screw-press worked by hand, and the in- 
troduction of steam for coinage purposes did not take place until 1836, three years 
after the building was completed. 

It is not my purpose to enumerate in detail the insufficiency of the present build- 
ing for the proper and safe execution of the immense amount of work now turned 
out. For detailed information on this point reference is made to the letters of the 
superintendent and operative officers inclosed. Certain it is that no private manu- 
facturing establishment would have worked continuously for fifty-seven years in the 
same building, with an increase of 800 per cent in its annual output (as shown by 
the coinage of pieces at this mint in 1889 as compared with 1833), without largely 
increasing its capacity. 

It has not been practicable to remedy the inadequacy of working space in the 
mint at Philadelphia by alterations and enlargements of the present building, owing 
to the fact that there is not sufficient area. 

It is essential for the efficient execution of the delicate and important processes of 
coinage that the mechanical operations of each department be conducted on the same 
floor. The work rooms of the coiner’s department, for instance — that is, all the 
rooms for cutting, rolling, milling, and the other coinage operations — should be on 
one floor. 

In 1882 the attention of Congress was directed to the insufficiency of the ground 
area for the business of the mint, and a bill was favorably reported from the Com- 
mittee on Coinage, Weights, and Measures authorizing the purchase of adjoining 
property covering a surface of 100 feet on Chestnut street and extending north 204 
feet on Broad street. 

Unfortunately this bill failed to become a law, and the magnificent building now 
occupied by the Girard Life Insurance, Annuity and Trust Company, valued at 
$1,000,000, has been built upon it, thus precluding the Government from obtaining 
possession of it. Nor is there any other property adjoining which it is possible for 
the Government now to secure; so that it is impracticable to extend the area of the 
mint in its present location. 

If therefore anything is to be done in the way of providing enlarged facilities for 
the mint at Philadelphia the matter resolves itself into one of two alternatives : either 
the enlargement of the present building by an attic story or an extension of the 
building to the line of the portico, or both; or, as the other alternative, the erection 
of a new mint. 

In accordance with estimates prepared by the Supervising Architect an appropria- 
tion of $220,000 was included in the sundry civil bill, approved October 2, 1888, “for 
the United States Mint at Philadelphia, Pa. ; for an additional story to and enlarg- 
ing the building, including vault, alterations, and other necessary work.” Of this 
appropriation the sum of $43,399.70 lias been expended for the construction of new 
vaults, leaving $176,600.30 available for the enlargement contemplated. 

Since this appropriation was made further plans and drawings have been prepared 
by the Supervising Architect contemplating an extension of the floor area by extend- 
ing the building front to the line of the portico. 



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In my annual report for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1889, 1 had the honor to 
recommend that the appropriation available, viz, $176,600.30, be increased to the sum 
of $420,000, that being the estimate of the Supervising Architect of the cost of the 
extension designated in the last plans. If, then, the mint remain on its present site, 
an immediate expenditure of $420,000 will be necessary to afford proper room for its 
business. The expenditure of even this large sum will remedy the existing state of 
things to only a limited extent, but will not accomplish the main purpose desired, 
viz, sufficient ground area for the location of the work rooms of the mechanical de- 
partments on one floor. 

The objections to an additional story are so forcibly pointed out in the letter of 
Superintendent Bosby shell that I shall not repeat them. 

The present time is opportune for the purchase of a convenient site for a new mint 
building in Philadelphia. It is believed that a suitable one, in a convenient section 
of the city, on one of its most prominent streets, can be procured at a cost not exceed- 
ing $500,000 and that the present site and edifice will sell for a sum approximating 
$800,000 ; so that if this bill should become a law about $300,000, the probable excess 
of the amount received for the present site above the cost of a new site, wonld be 
available towards the erection of a new mint. 

Estimates as to the cost of a new building suitable for the requirements of the 
mint at Philadelphia will of course be furnished by the Supervising Architect, but 
I may remark that the mint at San Francisco, finished in 1873, which is a large gran- 
ite building, one of the most beautiful in that city, perfectly adapted to its purposes, 
was erected at a cost of $2,130,512.15 (not including the cost of site, $100,000). Mak- 
ing allowance for the reduced cost of labor and material at the present date as com- 
pared with 1873, and especially in Philadelphia, as compared with San Francisco, 
it would seem reasonable to say that $1,500,000 would be the outside cost of a suit- 
able building in Philadelphia, or a net cost of $1,200,000, against an appropriation 
of $420,000 already asked for the enlargement of the mint if it remains in its present 
location. 

I can not too strongly urge upon Congress the advisability of purchasing a new site 
and erecting a new mint, especially as the opportunity which now presents itself for 
securing a convenient and suitable location for a reasonable consideration may not 
soon occur again. 

Surely this great Government, with its growing wealth and population, producing 
annually from its mines $100,000,000 of the precious metals, can afford to have the 
very finest buildings as well as the best appliances and machinery for the important 
and delicate operations of coining money, and it would seem as if an appropriation 
of $1,200,000 for the erection of a suitable structure for its most important mint 
should not be considered a piece of extravagance, but rather as an act demanded by 



our national character. 

I inclose herewith letters from the superintendent and operative officers of the 
mint at Philadelphia, to which attention is invited. 

Trusting this matter will receive your favorable recommendation, 

I am, very respectfully, 

E. O. Leech, 
Director of the Mint . 

Hon. William Windom, 

Secretary of the Treasury, Washington , D. C. 



Treasury Department, Office of the Supervising Architect, 

Washington , D. C., February 17, 1890 . 

Sir : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt by reference from you of the 
. letter of the 13th instant, addressed to you by the Committee on Public Buildings 
and Grounds, House of Representatives, requesting to be informed as to the present 
10285 M 6 

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condition of the United States Mint building at Philadelphia, Pa., in regard to size, 
convenience, etc., for transacting the public business, the need of a new building for 
the purposes of the United States Mint, and such other information in regard to the 
subject as may be deemed of use to said committee in connection with H. R. hill 
3910, introduced January 6, 1890, by Hon. Henry H. Bingham, to provide for the sale 
of the present United States Mint building and site, the purchase of land suitable 
for a site, and the erection thereon of a new public building for carrying on the busi- 
ness of the mint in Philadelphia, Pa., the proceeds of the sale of the present United 
States Mint property, or so much thereof as may be necessary, to be used for the pur- 
pose of purchasing a new site and erecting thereon a new building for said purpose, 
and to submit the following : 

I invite attention to the statements made on pages 62 and 63 of the Annual 
Report of the Supervising Architect of the Treasury Department, 1889. 

The mint building in Philadelphia has been changed in arrangements and enlarged 
by minor additions from time to time to meet the demands of the present public busi- 
ness, and practically all of the available ground within the metes and bounds of the 
site is now occupied by the building. 

With the appropriation made by act of Congress approved October 2, 1888, viz, 
$220,000, and the additional appropriation of $200,000 asked for in the annual esti- 
mates, it is proposed to build a third story to the present building and extend the 
wings on each side of the entrance portico out to the street front as further additions 
to the structure. 

By making a new assignment of the old portion of the structure with the addi- 
tional floor area to be obtained by such improvements there would be better facilities 
for the conduct of the business of the mint than there is now afforded in the building. 

These improvements, however, would not provide the convenience needed for the 
proper conduct of the work of the mint, nor secure full economy in the management 
that could be applied if a structure with sufficient ground area was erected that 
would enable the work of the coinage of metals to be done continuously on one floor 
without the necessity of irregular transfers of the metals during the process of its 
coinage between working rooms not contiguously arranged, and would prevent the 
inconvenience and delay incident to the necessary use of elevator service between 
the different stories of the building. 

The metals should be delivered at one station and pass regularly from that point 
through the several apartments contiguously arranged, properly equipped with the 
necessary furnaces, machines, plants, etc., and assigned to the different branches of 
the work incident to its completion, so that after the metals shall have reached the 
apartment in which the last branch of work thereon is to he done the coins will be 
perfected and ready for storage or distribution. 

The actual cost of the present United States Mint building in Philadelphia, includ- 
ing the cost of alterations and repairs to June 30, 1889, is $432,871.48 plus the cost of 
site — $31,666.67 — which aggregates $464,538.15, in connection with which must be 
considered the work now being done under the appropriation of $220,000 made by 
act of Congress approved October 2, 1888, and the appropriation asked for in the 
annual estimates. 

From computations made in the office of the Supervising Architect of this Depart- 
ment based upon information received, it is found that, to construct such a building, 
with proper lighting, ventilating, and heating facilities, that would afford proper ac- 
commodations for the present and prospective needs of the mint in said city, $1,500,000 
will be required in addition to such amount as may be needed for the purchase of 
land suitably and adaptably located for the purpose. 

After duly considering the subject, I am of the opinion that the convenience of the 
public business done at the mint and the economy of the public service would be 
best consulted by the acquisition of a new site and the erection thereon of a new 
suitable building for the exclusive use of the United States Mint. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



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I would therefore suggest that, to facilitate a speedy compliance with the provi- 
sions of the bill, should it become a law, said H. R. bill should be so modified as to 
make a specific appropriation for the purchase of land for a site and the erection of 
the building in addition to the sale of the present site and building, after the com- 
pletion of the new building, and that the proceeds from such sale be deposited with 
the Treasurer of the United States as miscellaneous receipts derived from the sale of 
Government property. 

Respectfully, yours, 

James H. Windrim, 
Supervising Architect. 



Hon. William Windom, 

Secretary of the Treasury. 



On June 5, 1890, Mr. Darlington, from the Committee on Public 
Buildings and Grounds, submitted the following report: 



[House Report No. 2326, Fifty-first Congress, first session.] 



The Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds, having had under consideration 
the biU (H. R. 9957) to provide for the purchase of a site and the erection of a public 
building thereon at Philadelphia, submits the following report : 

The necessity for the enlargement and improvement of the Mint of the United 
States at Philadelphia, for which this bill provides, has been a matter of considera- 
tion by Congress since 1880. The House and Senate committees of the Forty-sixth 
Congress reported favorably upon a similar measure, and the House Committee on 
Coinage, Weights, and Measures of the Forty-seventh Congress unanimously re- 
ported a bill which had originated in the Senate of like import. The necessity for 
increasing the facilities of the Philadelphia Mint has never been questioned, but 
from various causes the bills to which reference is made failed of final action in the 
House. 

In considering the biU submitted, your committee has been greatly aided by infor- 
mation furnished by the Secretary of the Treasury and the Director of the Mint, 
reenforced by the clear, concise, and intelligent statement of the superintendent 
and operative officers of the Philadelphia Mint, as well as by a memorial signed by 
the commissioners appointed by the President to conduct the annual trial of the pyx 
for the coinage of all the mints during the year 1889. From these various authori- 
ties, all in substantial agreement as regards the embarrassments to which the officers 
in charge are subjected by reason of confined quarters, entailing lack of machinery, 
imperfect ventilation and sanitation, your committee is clearly of the opinion that 
the provision for the enlargement of the present mint building included in the sundry 
civil bill of 1888 ($220,000) signally fails to meet the requirements of effective public 
service. That provision was “ for an additional story to and enlarging the building, 
including vaults, alterations, and other necessary work.” Of this proposed enlarge, 
ment of the building Supervising Architect J. H. Windrim says that, while it would 
afford somewhat better facilities for the conduct of business than at present exist- 
it would not provide the conveniences needed nor secure economy in management 
that could be secured by a structure with proper ground area. Nor can the enlarge- 
ment already authorized be made without an additional appropriation. 

The present mint was erected and completed for coinage purposes in 1833, and has 
been used, without material enlargement, fifty-seven years. The coinage executed 
in 1833, at which time the production of the precious metals in the United States was 
insignificant, was 10,370,700 pieces, of the value of $3,765,710, and the total value of the 
gold and silver product for the ensuing ten years was only $7,750,000. The present 
annual product of the precions metals in the United States approximates $100,000,000, 
and the coinage of the Philadelphia Mint for the calendar year 1889 aggregated 
94,012,194 pieces, of the value of $24,804,854.84. In addition to the coinage of gold and 



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RE POET OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



silver the mint at Philadelphia is the only institution designated by law to execute 
minor coinage, for which the demand for small exchanges is cumulative and press- 
ing. So great is the demand for these small coins that the Government has been 
obliged to purchase the blanks ready for stamping, while 9 presses have been kept 
busy for many months in the execution of this coinage to supply public demand. 
The work demanded of this mint has increased 800 per cent since the completion of 
the present building in 1833, as is shown by its annual output. 

Your committee finds a consensus of opinion among the officers familiar with coin- 
age matters as respects the remedy, which is increased ground area. This is neces- 
sary for the efficient and proper conduct of the delicate and important processes of 
coinage, which, whether scientific or mechanical, are to be ranked as works of pre- 
cision. The entire mechanical operation should be on a single floor, the subdepart- 
ments of each operative officer being contiguous and continuous. In default of this 
the work is hindered and the risk greatly increased. This is particularly true in 
the coinage department, where the various processes for converting the ingot into 
coin have to be carried on in rooms often widely separated, however related the 
processes may be, the metal in its several stages passing from ground floor to second 
story, from second story to basement, and thence to the presses on the ground floor. 
It is evident that processes so important and so necessarily connected with national 
credit should be divested of all unnecessary risks. That is a desideratum ; and it 
can be secured only by such an arrangement of the coining department as will ad- 
mit of the carrying forward of the work continuously in rooms contiguous and at 
grade, so that the officer in charge may have the metal in its various stages under 
his eye. 

Such necessary supervision of the processes of coining can not be secured in the 
present structure, even if the entire available ground space should be given up to 
the coiner. But the processes through which the metals pass before they can go to 
the coiner are many, and necessarily of absolute accuracy. The coinage laid upon 
this mint requires the melter and refiner to melt daily fi;om 5 to 7 net tons of silver. 
This important work, on the accuracy of which the integrity of our coin largely 
depends, has to be carried on in cramped quarters and at a disadvantage that greatly 
increases the labor and risk of that officer. The entire Treasury purchases of bul- 
lion assigned to this mint for conversion into coin have to be passed in at a window 
of a department not under control of the melter and refiner, and no modification of 
the structure yet proposed would remove this difficulty. The room referred to is 
the deposit melting room, where the bullion of depositors is melted, a room that 
should be absolutely isolated from every other and from the public. The melter and 
refiner is, by courtesy and necessity, allowed to receive the Treasury purchases 
through the window of this room, and through the same window must be taken the 
fuel for its furnaces. This involves constant interruptions of the processes, and 
more or less confusion, alike unjust and detrimental to the operative officers con- 
cerned, the efficiency of public service, and to depositors, whose deposits are there 
prepared for assay. 

The exigencies of the other operative departments of this mint confine the melter 
and refiner to a single room, in which he is required to melt and prepare ingots of 
gold, silver, nickel, and bronze. It is believed that conditions so incompatible with 
work that must be absolutely accurate or fail altogether do not exist in any mint of 
modem structure. No subdivision of any space available in the building can remedy 
this disability. Beyond these defects the chimney-stacks of the melter and refiners 
department are overtopped by the walls of the adjoining buildings to the extent of 
five stories. This leaves the draft of the melting-furnaces at the caprice of the winds, 
which from the west impair the draft and from the east drive the fumes and prod- 
uct of combustion into the windows of neighboring residents. It may be regarded 
as merely a question of time when the neighboring residents will complain of this 
aunoyance as a nuisance, 



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REPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



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When the present structure was planned many of the processes of metallurgy now 
employed were unknown. Some improved machinery, operated by steam, w;as intro- 
duced in 1836. Improved appliances have been added from time to time, until now 
this mint lags behind a quarter of a century in the race of improvement simply be- 
cause every inch of available space has been exhausted. Machinery of the most ad- 
vanced order has become a necessity, and it awaits the purchaser who has space for 
its accommodation and operation. The mint at Philadelphia can not avail itself of 
such desirable and necessary appliances because its ground space is fully occupied 
already. The central area, originally intended for ventilating purposes and work- 
ing space, has, from time to time, as the exigency demanded, been occupied by 
structures that impair ventilation and lighting and endanger the health, as they 
decrease the comfort and convenience, of the working force. The high modem 
structures on either hand prevent the escape and diffusion of the acid fumes from 
the refinery and cause them to pervade the entire building. 

It is proper to note that certain operations by law authorized to be performed at 
the Philadelphia mint are not performed at any of the other mints. The dies for the 
coinage of all the mints and for national medals are all designed and prepared at 
this mint, and all medals of a national character are executed in the same institution. 
The engraving department, one of the most important of all, because it must main- 
tain uniformity of design in coinage, at present is indifferently accommodated. It 
can not be relieved by any modification of the present structure. The assayer and 
the melter and refiner perform intimately related functions, yet they are necessarily 
located on different floors at present ; nor would alterations of the structure enable 
them to occupy communicating apartments. The assay department of the Philadel- 
phia mint enjoys, and has from an early day enjoyed, an enviable repute for accu- 
racy throughout the commercial world. Such repute is of incalculable value to the 
nation, since it goes to establish the very foundation of national credit through the 
known and invariable integrity of its coinage. 

Your committee finds that it is impossible to put systematic methods in force 
in the present structure. Yet such methods are undoubtedly necessary to secure the 
highest results at a minimum risk and with economy. It is the parent mint, estab- 
lished early in the nation's career, and located at Philadelphia for reasons quite ob- 
vious. The location is near the seaboard, yet not exposed to the hazards of inva- 
sion; in a great commercial and manufacturing metropolis, and within easy com- 
munication of the trade centers of the Atlantic slope. The location is in itself a 
guaranty of safety for the treasure that naturally flows to the mint. And this is 
the foremost and richest nation of the world, the greatest producer of the money 
metals of all, and now, as for years, requiring more service from its mints than any 
other nation. Your committee submits that the parent mint of the foremost nation on 
the globe should not be second to any either in working space, appliances, or in that 
structural excellence and design which conjoined crystallize the history of national 
progress in adamant. While your committee fully discriminates between what is 
necessary and appropriate, and what is extravagant and lavish in expenditures, it 
recommends such a reconstruction of the parent mint at Philadelphia as shall respond 
to public exigencies and redound to the credit of the nation. 

In this connection it is proper again to refer to the fact that the commission ap- 
pointed by the President to conduct the annual assay last February, was composed 
of men eminent in the business, political, and scientific world, many of them distin- 
guished physicists and metallurgists, and that this commission, becoming impressed 
with the crowded condition of the mint building and its processes, unanimously 
memorialized Congress in favor of a new structure with greater ground space and 
approved modern appliances. The gentlemen of that commission represented every 
section of the Union, from Maine to California, and their unanimous testimony has 
value accordingly. 

After giving full consideration to the facts submitted by the Secretary of the Treas- 



ury, the Director of the Mint, the superintendent of the mint at Philadelphia, and 

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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



his operative officers, together with the statements of the Supervising Architect of 
the Treasury Department, the committee is enabled to conclude — 

First. The present mint building at Philadelphia is entirely inadequate to the 
service required both as regards area and appliances. 

Second. No enlargement of ground area is possible ; to increase height will not 
remove the disadvantages under which the operations are performed. 

Third. To remedy the disabilities so clearly set forth, a new site with ample ground 
area is absolutely necessary, and a new building on modern lines, with such modern 
appliances as experience has proved necessary for good work and precision, be 
erected and equipped. 

The Director of the Mint states that of the sum of $220,000 appropriated by the 
sundry civil bill of 1888 for improvements the sum of $176,600.30 remains available, 
and that he has recommended, upon an estimate of the Supervising Architect, an in- 
crease of this balance to $420,000. If then the mint remains at its present location, 
an immediate expenditure of $420,000 will be necessary. 

The bill submitted with this report provides for the purchase of a site and the 
erection of anew building at Philadelphia, at a cost not exceeding $2,000,000, and 
the sale of the present building and site. The committee believes that a new site 
with ample ground space and in a desirable location can be procured at a cost of 
$500,000, and that the property now occupied can be sold for at least $800,000. The 
net cost therefore of the property would be $1,200,000, against an appropriation of 
$420,000 already asked and in part appropriated for the enlargement of the mint if 
it remains at its present location. It is probable that the Government can at this 
time purchase a desirable site at a less cost than at any future time. It failed to 
avail itself of the option of the entire area from its western foundations to Broad street 
at a moderate price some years ago, and again in 1882, when the land might have 
been had for $400,000, and probably less. The same land can not be purchased to-day 
for less than $2,000,000 with the improvements. 

The committee assumes that the mint will be permanently located at Philadelphia, 
and as enlargement is a certainty, true economy points at the present as the proper 
time to provide therefor. The Philadelphia Mint was the first public building erected 
in the United States under Federal authority, and the act creating it was approved 
by President Washington. Its history and the coinage of the nation is one of the 
many historical associations that cluster around the city of Philadelphia — memorable 
in every patriotic impulse and action. 

The committee recommend the passage of the bill with the following amendments : 

In line 12 strike out all after the word “ dollars" down to and including line 15, 
which is the appropriating clause. 

In line 26 strike out the words “ by this act.” 

In line 38 strike out the word “ said.” 

In line 41 strike out the word “ said.” 

No action was taken, during the first session of the Fifty-first Con- 
gress, by the House of Representatives, on the favorable report, from 
the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds on the bill providing 
for the purchase of a new site and the erection of a new mint at Phila- 
delphia. 

During the second session of the Fifty-first Congress, Senate bill No. 
5110 (being identical with the bill favorably reported from the House 
Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds) to provide for the pur- 
chase of a site and the erection of a public building thereon at Phila- 
delphia, was taken from the Calendar and passed the Senate February 
26, 1891. 



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In the House of Representatives, on March 2, 1891, on motion of Mr. 
Bingham, the rules were suspended and Senate bill 5110 was passed. 
The bill was approved by the President the next day. 

The following is the text of the law: 

A BILL to provide for the purchase of a site and the erection of a public building thereon at Phila- 
delphia, in the State of Pennsylvania. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of Amer- 
ica in Congress assembled , That the Secretary of the Treasury he, and he is hereby, 
authorized and directed to acquire, by purchase, condemnation, or otherwise, a site 
and cause to be erected thereon a suitable building, including fireproof vaults, 
heating \and ventilating apparatus, elevators, and approaches, for the use and ac- 
commodation of the United States Mint, in th*> city of Philadelphia and State of 
Pennsylvania, the cost of said site and building, including said vaults, heating and 
ventilating apparatus, elevators, and approaches, complete, not to exceed the sum 
of two million dollars. 

So much of the appropriation as may be necessary to defray traveling expenses 
and other expenses incident to the selection of the site, and for necessary survey 
thereof, shall be immediately available. 

So much of said appropriation as may be necessary for the preparation of sketch 
plans, drawings, specifications, and detailed estimates for the building by the Su- 
pervising Architect of the Treasury Department shall be available immediately upon 
the selection of the site by the Secretary of the Treasury. 

No money appropriated shall be available, except as hereinbefore provided, until 
a valid title to the site for said building shall be vested in the United States, nor 
until the State of Pennsylvania shall have ceded to the United States exclusive 
jurisdiction over the same, during the time the United States shall be or remain the 
owner thereof, for all purposes except the administration of the criminal laws of 
said State and the service of civil process therein. 

After the said site shall have been paid for and the sketch plans and detailed draw- 
ings for the buildings shall have been prepared by the Supervising Architect, and ap- 
proved by the Secretary of the Treasury and Director of the Mint, the balance of 
appropriation shall be available for fhe erection and completion of the building, in- 
cluding fireproof vaults, heating and ventilating apparatus, elevators, and approaches, 
and such balance of the appropriation as may remain available after the building 
shall have been completed shall be applied to and used in the purchase of apparatus 
for the purposes of the mint. 

The building shall be unexposed to danger from fire by an open space of at least forty 
feet on each side, including streets and alleys. 

That the Secretary of the Treasury be, and he is hereby, further directed, when the 
new building herein authorized to be erected shall have been completed, to dispose of 
the present United States Mint building in the city of Philadelphia and State of Penn- 
sylvania, at private or public sale, and to give a quitclaim deed to the purchaser 
thereof, and to deposit the proceeds of the sale to the credit of the Treasurer of the 
United States in the manner prescribed by section thirty-six hundred and seventeen 
and thirty-six hundred and eighteen, United States Revised Statutes. 

Soon after the passage of this law the question was raised as to whether 
it contained any appropriation for carrying into effect its provisions. 

The question was submitted by the Secretary of the Treasury to the 
Attorney-General for his opinion. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The following is the opinion of the Attorney-General on the subject: 



Department of Justice, 
Washington , 1 ). C., March 28, 1891 . 



Sir : By letter of the 7th instant you invited the attention of the Attorney-General 
to an act of Congress, approved March 3, 1891, entitled “An act to provide for the 
purchase of a site and the erection of a public building thereon at Philadelphia, in 
the State of Pennsylvania,” and requested his opinion “whether or not said bill 
carries the appropriation of $2,000,000 mentioned therein for the purchase of the site 
named in the bill and the erection of a building thereon.” You inclosed a copy of 
the act, the important part of which for this discussion is as follows : 

“ That the Secretary of the Treasury be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed 
to acquire, by purchase, condemnation, or otherwise, a site, and cause to be erected 
thereon a suitable building, including fireproof vaults, heating and ventilating ap- 
paratus, elevators, and approaches, for the use and accommodation of the United 
States mint in the city of Philadelphia and State of Pennsylvania, the cost of said 
site and building, including said vaults, heating and ventilating apparatus, eleva- 
tors, and approaches, complete, not to exceed the sum of $2,000,000. 

“So much of the appropriation as may be necessary to defray traveling expenses 
and other expenses incident to the selection of the site, and for necessary survey 
thereof, shall be immediately available. 

“ So much of said appropriation as may be necessary for the preparation of sketch 
plans, drawings, specifications, and detailed estimates for the building by the Super- 
vising Architect of the Treasury Department shall be available immediately upon 
the selection of the site by the Secretary of the Treasury. 

“ No money appropriated shall be available, except as hereinbefore provided, until 
a valid title to the site for said building shall be vested in the United States, nor 
until the State of Pennsylvania shall have ceded to the'United States exclusive juris- 
diction over the same, during the time the United States shall be or remain the owner 
thereof, for all purposes except the administration of the criminal laws of said State 
and the service of civil process therein. 

“ After the said site shall have been paid for, and the sketch plans and detailed 
drawings for the building shall have been prepared by the Supervising Architect 
and approved by the Secretary of the Treasury and Director of the Mint, the balance 
of appropriation shall be available for the erection and completion of the building 
including fireproof vaults, heating and ventilating apparatus, elevators, and ap- 
proaches, and such balance of the appropriation as may remain available after the 
building shall have been completed shall be applied to and used in the purchase of 
apparatus for the purposes of the mint.” 

In my opinion no money is appropriated by this act for the purposes therein men- 
tioned. Its langftage, just quoted, if taken alone, would probably by implication 
carry an appropriation ; but when we consider it in connection with the rule of con- 
struction laid down in the section of the sundry civil act of August 7, 1882 (22 
Stats., 305), referred to by you, together with the parliamentary history of this act, 
and others of the same character passed by the same Congress, it is impossible to es- 
cape the conclusion that Congress did not intend by the language above quoted to 
take the sum of money therein mentioned out of the Treasury. The section in the 
sundry civil act of 1882 is as follows : 

“ Provided , That no act passed authorizing the Secretary of the Treasury to pur- 
chase a site and erect a public building thereon shall be held and construed to ap- 
propriate money, unless the act in express language makes such appropriations.” 

Though this is a proviso in an appropriation bill, its language is so general as to 
affect all future legislation. The act under consideration, therefore, must contain 
an express appropriation of money. There certainly is no express appropriation of 
$2,000,000. There is a reference in the second paragraph of the act to an appropria- 
tion. In the third paragraph the reference is repeated, with the words “ said ap- 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



89 



propriation.” The word “ appropriated ” occurs in the fourth paragraph, and “ bal- 
ance of the appropriation ” twice in the fifth. It would he natural to refer these 
words to the express authority conferred on the Secretary of the Treasury in the first 
paragraph — to acquire by purchase, condemnation, or otherwise, a site, and cause to 
be erected thereon a suitable building not to exceed the sum of $2,000,000, and to 
give to that authority the effect of an appropriation. Such a construction, however, 
would be an appropriation by implication, forbidden by the section of the sundry 
civil act of 1882, quoted above. 

The parliamentary history of the act will show that the words “ appropriation ” 
and “ appropriated,” wherever they occur in the act, must have reference to a future 
appropriation to be made in another act, and must be construed to limit the expend- 
iture under such appropriation. It appears that on May 2, 1890 (Congressional Rec- 
ord, vol. 21, part 5, p. 4172), a bill (H. R. 9957) to provide for the purchase of a site 
and the erection of a public building thereon, at Philadelphia, in the State of Penn- 
sylvania, was introduced by Mr. Bingham, was read twice, and referred to the Com- 
mittee on Public Buildings and Grounds. On June 5, 1890 (Congressional Record, 
vol. 21, part 6, p. 5670), Mr. Darlington, from the Committee on Public Buildings 
and Grounds, reported this bill with amendments, and it was committed to the Com- 
mittee of the Whole House on the state of the Union and ordered to be printed. The 
bill, as originally introduced by Mr. Bingham, was exactly like the act under con- 
sideration except that at the end of the first paragraph were the following words : 
“ Which said sum of two million dollars is hereby appropriated for said purpose out 
of any moneys in the United States Treasury not otherwise appropriated,” and that 
in the fourth paragraph after the words “no money appropriated” were the words 
“by this act,” and in the fifth paragraph, before the word “appropriation” as it 
occurs twice therein, was the word “ said.” The bill as reported back by the com- 
mittee was accompanied by a report (Report No. 2326) which recommended the pas- 
sage of the bill, with the following amendments: 

“In line twelve, strike out all after the word “dollars” down to and including 
line fifteen, which is the appropriating clause. In line twenty-six, strike out the words 
“ by this act.” In line thirty-eight, strike out the word “ said” In line forty-one, 
strike out the word “ said.” 

Nothing else was done with the bill in the first session. On February 19, 1891, Mr. 
Spooner, for Mr. Cameron, introduced in the Senate a bill exactly in the words of the 
bill which we have followed in the House, as amended by the Committee on Public 
Buildings. The bill was referred in the Senate to the Committee on Public Grounds 
and Buildings, and on February 26, 1891, was reported back and passed. February 
28, 1891, in the House the Senate bill was read twice and referred to the Committee 
on Public Grounds and Buildings, by whom, on the same day, it was reported with 
the recommendation that, as it was identical with the House, bill, it be taken as a 
substitute for the same and passed (H. R. 4025). It was passed in this form, and was 
approved on March 3, 1891. The Senate bill is the same bill as the amended House 
bill, and was introduced as an original bill in the Senate merely to facilitate its 
passage. The history of the House bill must therefore affect the construction of the 
Senate bill which finally became the law. The amendments to the original House 
bill conclusively established the intention on the part of Congress to eliminate the 
appropriation. 

A reference to the Congressional Record, vol. 21, part 5, pp. 2040 to 2049, will 
disclose an extended debate as to the policy to be pursued by the House of Repre- 
sentatives on bills for the erection of public buildings and will throw light on the 
purpose of the House Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds, in striking out 
the appropriating clause in the bill under discussion. It will there be found that the 
conclusion reached was, that no public building bill should be allowed to pass con- 
taining an appropriation ; that the matter of appropriations for the buildings whose 
construction was authorized should be left to the Appropriations Committee, to be 



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90 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



included in the sundry civil bill. The Senate concurred in that plan as will be 
found by reference to the Congressional Record, vol. 21, part 5, pp. 4188 and 4189, where, 
in discussion over the passage of a bill authorizing the erection of a public building 
at Lima, Ohio, Mr. Payne, in support of his amendment to the bill, striking out the 
appropriating clause, in answer to Mr. Sherman’s remark that “ the words of appro- 
priation ought to be left in” said: “No, the committee of conference have agreed, 
on the demand of the other House, to strike out all the appropriations in public 
building bills, and all the bills that go to the House are amended in that way.” 

Mr. Sherman. “And providing for the appropriations in a separate general bill.” 

Many of the public building bills passed by the Fifty- first Congress were prepared 
with an appropriating clause, and when this was stricken out in accordance with the 
policy just adverted to, care was not always taken to strike out also in subsequent 
clauses of the same bills references to the eliminated appropriation. These clauses 
usually fixed the time at which parts of the appropriation should become available. 
The only effect which can be properly given to such references in public building 
acts, is to make them apply to appropriations for the purpose of carrying out the 
act to be thereafter made. 

A consideration of other bills passed by this same Congress for the erection of pub- 
lic buildings, in connection with the appropriations therefor in the sundry civil bill, 
leaves no doubt of the correctness of this construction. On page 66 of the Pamphlet 
Laws of the first session, Fifty-first Congress, is an act authorizing the construction 
of a public building at Baton Rouge, La. The third clause of that bill is : “So much 
of the appropriation herein made as may be necessary to defray the expenses of ad- 
vertising for proposals, etc., shall be immediately available.” 

The third clause is : “So much of said appropriation as may be necessary for the 
preparation, etc., shall be available immediately upon the report of the commission- 
ers selecting the site.” 

Other clauses of a similar character folio w. Nevertheless, we find on page 371 of the 
sundry civil act for the same year an appropriation “ for post-office at Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana; for purchase of site and commencement of building under present limit, 
thirty thousand dollars.” It would be absurd to contend that the bill, authorizing 
the construction and fixing the limit of $100,000, contained an appropriation of that 
amount, and that this appropriation of $30,000 in the sundry civil bill was in addi- 
tion thereto. The two acts are only to be reconciled, therefore, on the theory that 
the first was not intended to carry an appropriation, as its parliamentary history 
will show, and that the reference to the appropriation made in the original act 
must be given effect by applying it to the appropriation under the sundry civil bill. 
The same thing is true of the acts authorizing the construction of public buildings 
at Martinsburg (Pamphlet Laws, Fifty-first Congress, first session, 127), at Lafay- 
ette, Ind., and at Burlington, Iowa, by the same congress (Pamphlet Laws, pp. Ill 
and 107), appropriations for which will be found in the sundry civil act in the same 
volume (p. 371 et seq.) of the Pamphlet Laws. 

The conclusion necessarily is, then, that there is no appropriation in the act now 
in question. The fact that Congress failed in the sundry civil appropriation act 
of 1891 to make any appropriation to which the language in this act can apply, is 
not material. 

The presumption arising therefrom must be that the Fifty-first Congress deemed 
it wise to delay the time for carrying out the act until a future Congress should make 
an appropriation therefor. 

Very respectfully. 



Wm. H. Taft, 
Solicitor General. 



W. H. H. Miller, 

Attorney General. 

It will be seen that the Attorney-General held that the act in ques- 
tion contained no appropriation. 

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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT, 



91 



On July 10, 1891, the Secretary of the Treasury addressed a commu- 
uication to the following-named gentlemen, residing in Philadelphia: 
Hon. E. H. Fitter, Samuel Gustine Thompson, Anthony J. Drexel, Wil- 
liam M. Singerly, James H. Windrim, Alexander K. McClure, and O. C. 
Bosbyshell. 

The communication read : 

Treasury Department, 

Office of the Secretary, 

Washington, D. C., July 10, 1891. 



Dear Sir: The act of Congress approved March 3, 1891, entitled “An act to pro- 
vide for the purchase of a site and the erection of a public building thereon,” di- 
rected “ That the Secretary of the Treasury be, and he is hereby, authorized and 
directed to acquire by purchase, condemnation, or otherwise, a site and cause to be 
erected thereon a suitable building, including fireproof vaults, heating and venti- 
lating apparatus, elevators, and approaches, for the use and accommodation of the 
United States Mint, in the city of Philadelphia and State of Pennsylvania, the cost of 
said site and building, including said vaults, heating and ventilating apparatus, ele- 
vators, and approaches, complete, not to exceed the sum of two million dollars.” 

It was the very general belief of those interested in the passage of this measure 
that it was the intention of Congress to appropriate $2,000,000 for carrying out the 
' purposes of the act, but owing to the absence of express language of appropriation, 
it has been decided that there is no money appropriated by this act for the purposes 
mentioned, and consequently that no expense can be incurred in connection there- 
with. In order, however, that the Department may be in a position to submit for 
future Congressional action some definite estimate as to the cost of procuring a suit- 
able site for the mint at Philadelphia, I have the honor to reqffest that you will act 
as a member of a commission of citizens of Philadelphia, designated by me, for the 
purpose of recommending to the Department a suitable site for the new mint build- 
ing in that city and an estimate of the probable cost. 

It will be understood, of course, that such services will be gratuitous and that no 
expenses of any kind connected with the work of the commission can be paid by the 
Department, and that no contract can be made with any person for the purchase of 
property. 

It will be a public service and I shall be personally obliged if you will act in the 
capacity requested. 

It is desired that a report in writing should be made to me by the commission not 
later than November of the present year. 

I am sir, very respectfully, 

Charles Foster, 
Secretary of the Treasury. 



On September 8, 1891, the commission designated by the Secretary of 
the Treasury submitted a unanimous report recommending a suitable 
site for the mint of the United States at Philadelphia, with an estimate 
of its cost, not exceeding $800,000. 

I have the honor to recommend that Congress be requested to appro- 
priate $800,000 for the purchase of a new site for the mint at Phila- 
delphia, including the preparation of plans for a new mint. 



AMENDMENT TO THE LAW REGARDING- PARTING AND REFINING OF 
BULLION AT THE MINTS AND ASSAY OFFICE AT NEW YORK. 

In my last fiscal report attention was directed to the fact that under 
a decision of the First Comptroller of the Treasury, October 24, 1885, 
the receipts from the sale of spent acid and blue vitriol, by-products of 

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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



the acid refineries, which prior to that time had been used in offsetting 
bills for acid for the refinery, were construed to be sales of old material, 
and the money so derived was required to be deposited in the Treasury 
of the United States as a miscellaneous receipt. 

In that report letters of the Secretary of the Treasury, the Director of 
the Mint, and the First Comptroller, recommending a change in the 
law, by which the amount received from the sale of by-products from acid 
refineries might be applied as formerly to the expenses of the refineries, 
were presented. 

These letters were as follows: 



Treasury Department, January 20, 1887 . 



Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith, for the consideration of Congress, 
copy of letter of the Director of the Mint, of the 12th instant, and inclosure, recom- 
mending certain legislation in the matter of parting and refining bullion by which 
the sale of the by-products of acid refineries can be applied to the reduction of the 
expenses of such refineries. 

Respectfully, yours, 



The Speaker of the House of Representatives. 



D. Manning, 

Secretary . 



Treasury Department, Bureau of the Mint, 

Washington , 2>. C., January 12, 1887 . 

Sir: Paragraph 8, page 379, of the Supplement to the Revised Statutes of the 
United States, provides : 

“And refining and parting of bullion shall be carried on at the mints of the United 
States and at the assay office at New York. 

“And it shall be lawful to apply the moneys arising from charges collected from 
depositors for these operations pursuant to law, so far as may be necessary, to the 
defraying in full of the expenses thereof, including labor, materials, and wastage. 

“ But no part of the moneys otherwise appropriated for the support of the mints 
and the assay office at New York shall be used to defray the expenses of refining and 
parting bullion.” 

Under this provision of law, which was passed originally in the appropriation act 
approved August 15, 1876 (19 Stats., 156, 157), the charges for parting and refining 
bullion were so fixed at the several coinage mints and the assay office at New York 
that the receipts should equal, as nearly as possible, the expenses of the opera- 
tions. The spent acid and blue vitriol resulting from the processes of refining, prior 
to October 24, 1885, Lave been credited on the bills for acid, thereby reducing the ex- 
penses of the refinery at the New York assay office some $20,000 a year. On the 24th 
October, 1885, the first comptroller decided that the receipts from spent acid and 
blue vitriol must be considered as old material, and, under section 3618 Revised Stat- 
utes, deposited in the Treasury. In the report of this Bureau for the last fiscal year, 
pages 6 and 7, 1 have referred to the effect of this ruling in the accounts of the assay 
office at New York. A similar effect will be produced upon the accounts of the 
whole mint service, in that the expenditure will not appear to have been dimin- 
ished by regular manufacturing assets. 

A still more important effect of this ruling Is to render the acid refineries of the 
mint service, under the present schedule of charges, no longer able to be self-support- 
ing, as the law requires. 

It will be necessary, therefore, either to increase the schedule of charges imposed 
upon depositors of bullion or modify the law so as to explicitly provide for the ap- 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



93 



plication of the proceeds of the sale of the by-products of the acid refineries of the 
mints and assay offices of the United States to the reduction of the expenses of the 
operations of such acid refineries. 

I have the honor to recommend the latter alternative, and beg to suggest that 
par. 8, p. 379, of the Supplement to the Revised Statutes, be reenacted in the legisla- 
tive appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1888, so as to read as follows : 

“And refining and parting of bullion shall be carried on at the mints of the United 
States and at the assay office at New York. 

“And it shall be lawful to apply, pursuant to law, the moneys arising from charges 
collected from depositors and from the proceeds of the sale of by-products resulting 
from the operations of the refinery, so far as may be necessary, to the defraying in 
full of the expenses thereof, including labor, materials, and wastage. 

“But no part of the moneys otherwise appropriated for the support of the mints 
and the assay office at New York shall be used to defray the expenses of refining and 
parting bullion.” 

Hoping that you will be pleased to present this matter to the consideration of 
Congress, , 

I am, very respectfully, yours, 



The Secretary of the Treasury. 



James P. Kimball, 
Director of the Mint. 



Treasury Department, January 14, 1887. 
Respectfully referred to the First Comptroller for report. 

Hugh S. Thompson, 

Assistant Secretary , 



Treasury Department, First Comptroller’s Office, 

Washington , D. C., January 15, 1887. 

Sir : I have examined the letter of the Hon. James P. Kimball, Director of the 
Mint, to you, of January 12, 1887, in regard to appending a clause to the bill making 
appropriations for the legislative, executive, and judicial departments of the Gov- 
ernment, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1888, containing a provision similar to 
that which was in the bill for 1876, found in 19 Stats., 156, 157, which letter you have 
referred to me for report. 

In reply, I will say I see no good reason why such a clause should not be appended 
to the bill in question. 

The letter of the Director of the Mint is herewith returned. 

Very respectfully, 



The Secretary of the Treasury. 



M. J. Durham, 

Comptroller . 



The following bill, framed to cover the proposed change, was intro- 
duced in the Fifty-first Congress: 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America 
in Congress assembled , That paragraph eight of chapter three hundred and twenty- 
seven of the Supplement to the Revised Statutes of the United States, which requires 
that refining and parting of bullion shall be carried on at the mints of the United 
States and at the assay office at New York, be amended by inserting after the word 
“law,” in the fourth line, the following words: “and from the proceeds of the sale 
of by-products resulting from the operations of the refinery,” so that the paragraph 
shall read: 



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REPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



“And it shall be lawful to apply the moneys arising from charges collected from 
depositors for these operations pursuant to law, and from the proceeds of the sale of 
by-products resulting from the operations of the refinery, so far as may be necessary, 
to the defraying in full of the expenses thereof, including labor, materials, and 
wastage." 

I have the honor to again urge the passage of this measure. 

SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS OF MINTS AND ASSAY OFFICES. 

The precious metals received at the mints and assay offices during 
the fiscal year 1891 were valued at $143,255,832, against $92,793,958 
received in the previous year, an increase of $50,461,874. 

The value of the precious metals deposited only partially represents 
the operations necessary for their metallurgical and mechanical treat- 
ment. 

The operations of the melting and refining departments of the coin- 
age mints and of the assay office at New Xork, so far as the value of 
the metals treated is concerned, is exhibited in the following table: 



Bullion Operations of the Melting Departments, 1891. 



Metals. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Coining value*. 


Gold 


4,052,727 
76, 210, 666 


$75,399,570 

88,681,500 




Total - 


80, 263, 393 


164,081,070 





The operations of the coining branches of the mints in the manufac- 
ture of finished coins from ingots prepared by the melting departments 
were, in value of the metals operated on, as follows: 



Bullion Operations of the Coining Departments, 1891. 



Metals. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Coining value. 


Gold 


2,587,321 

67,924,776 


$48, 136, 204 
79,039,738 


Silver 




Total 


70, 512,097 


127,175,942 





The work of the minor assay offices, which consisted in the receipt 
and assaying of deposits and the manufacture of unparted bars of gold 
and silver, was as follows: 



Operations of Minor Assay Offices, 1891. 



Metals. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Coining value. 


Gold 


188, 791 
63, 109 


$3,512,390 

73,435 




Total 


251, 900 


3, 585, 825 





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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



95 



The following is a summary of the three preceding tables, intended to 
exhibit, as nearly as possible, the value of the precious metals treated in 
the operations of the mints and assay offices during the last fiseal year: 

Bullion Operated Upon in the Melting and Coining Departments of all * 
the Mints and Assay Offices, 1891 . 



Metals. 


1 Standard 
ounces. 


Coining value. 


Gold : 


6, 640, 048 


$123, 535, 774 




144,135,442 


167, 721, 238 




150, 775, 400 


291,257,012 


Total | 



In quantity the precious metals operated upon in the different de- 
partments of the mints and assay offices during the last fiscal year ex- 
ceeded 228 tons of gold and 4,942 tons of silver. 

The value of the precious metals wasted in the metallurgical and 
mechanical operations was $12,287.05. 

In addition to operative wastage, a loss of $15,850.41 was incurred 
from the sale of sweeps, equivalent to the difference between the value 
of the precious metals contained in sweeps recovered and the amount 
realized from the sale of sweeps too base to be treated advantageously 
in Government refineries. 

There was a similar loss of $84.16 by the sale of leady melts, and a 
wastage of minor-coinage metal of the value of $1,188.78. 

These wastages and losses aggregated $29,410.40. 

Against these losses there were gains arising from the operations on 
bullion as follows: 



Character. 


Amount. 




$39, 393. 14 
8,155.20 
4, 752, 33 


Precious metals recovered in grains and sweepings 


Gain on bullion shipped from the minor assay offices to the mint for coinage 




Total gains 


52, 300. 67 





Deducting the value of the total operative wastage and loss on sale 
of sweeps from the value of the incidental gains of bullion, there was 
a net gain in the operations of the mints during the year of $22,890.27. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The relative cost of the coinage executed at the four coinage mints 
is exhibited in the following table: 



Cost of Coinage at each Mint, 1891. 



Location of mint. 


Pieces 

coined. 


Pieces 

coined, exclu- 
sive of minor 
coins. 


Expenses 
for salaries, 
wages, and 
incidentals. 


Cost per 
piece, includ- 
ing minor 
coinage. 


Cost per 
pieoe, exclu- 
sive of minor 
coinage. 


Philadelphia 

San Francisco 

New Orleans 

Carson 


94,749, 632 
12, 542, 565 
9, 870, 913 
2, 384, 767 


31, 409, 082 
12, 542, 565 
9, 870, 913 
2, 384, 767 


$552, 099. 07 
299,585.31 
201, 163. 76 
134, 667. 25 


$0. 00582+ 


$0.0175+ 
.0239- 
.0203 + 
.0564+ 


Total and average 




119, 547, 877 


56, 207, 327 


1, 187, 515. 39 


0.00992+ 


. 0211+ 



While it is inequitable to draw comparisons between the relative cost 
of coinage at the various mints, as exhibited in the above table, for the 
reason that the character and amount of the coinages executed at them 
are so dissimilar, it is gratifying to report that the expenses of coinage 
was considerably reduced as compared with prior years, the cost per 
piece last year being slightly less than 1 cent, against a cost per piece 
exceeding 1 cent the prior year, and, exclusive of minor coinage, 2^ 
cents per piece during the last fiscal year against 2£ cents in the pre- 
ceding year. 

The following table exhibits the proportion of finished coins produced 
from ingots operated upon at each of the coinage mints during the 
year: 

Percentage of Good Coin Produced from Ingots operated upon, for the 

Fiscal Year 1891. 



Coinage mints. 


Gold. 


Silver. 




43.9 


46.2 


San Francisco 


52.1 


51.1 


New Orleans 


48.8 


Carson 


50.7 


56.1 





MINT AT PHILADELPHIA. 



The value of the gold and silver received at the mint at Philadelphia 
during the fiscal year 1891, was: 



Gold $7,613,486.19 

Silver 50,338,474.33 



In addition 482,500 pounds of minor coinage blanks were received. 

In the assay department the number of assays made during year ap- 
proximated : 



Gold.. 

Silver 



17,140 

45,200 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 97 

The quantity of precious metals operated upon by the melter and re- 
finer was : 

Standard ounces. 

Gold 824,873 

Silver - 35, 390, 724 

The melter and refiner returned in settlement of his accounts a sur- 
plus of both gold and silver, as follows : 

Standard ounces. 

Gold 115. 044 

Silver 1, 801. 60 

The number of melts made in the same department and the number 

condemned during the fiscal year were as follows: 



Melts of Gold and Silver, 1891. 



Metals. 


For bars. 


For ingots. 


Made. 


Condemned. 


Gold 


309 


10 


0 




769 


9,688 


137 


Total 


1,078 


9,698 


137 





The operations of the refinery of the mint at Philadelphia are exhib- 
ited in the following table: 



Refinery Operations, 1891. 



Bullion. 


Gold 

(standard 

ounces). 


Silver 
(standard 
ounces) . 


Sent to refinery : 

Gross weight 


415, 881 
241, 589 
241,605 


475, 119 
678,833 
681,050 


Standard ounces by assay 


Returned from refinery 





The operations of the coining department, comprising gold, silver, 
and minor coinage metal, are exhibited in the following tables: 



Metals operated on. 


Ounces. 


Gold 


67, 560 
31, 108, 225 
7, 321,005 




Minor coinage 




Wastage of the Coiner’s Department. 



Description. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Gold 


2. 268 
j 2, 747. 74 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The wastage of the precious metals in the mechanical branch of the mint 
was very small as compared with the large amount operated upon. 

The coinage executed was as follows: 



Description. 


| Number of 
| pieces. 


Value. 


Gold 


65,428 
31, 343, 654 
63, 340,550 

| 94,749,632 


$537, 002.50 

16.729. 774.15 
1, 166,936.50 

18.433. 713.15 

1 


Silver 


Minor coins 


Total 



The percentage of good coins produced from ingots operated upon was: 
Gold, 43.9 per cent; silver, 46.2 per cent. 

The number of medals struck in the same department for the year was 
as follows: 

Medals Manufactured, 1891. 



Character. 


N umber. 


Gold 


191 

1,502 

1,600 






Total 


3,293 



i 



In my last fiscal report attention was directed to the valuable and 
material improvements introduced in the mint at Philadelphia, under 
the efficient management of the present superintendent, Mr. O. 0. 
Bosbyshell, insuring not only greater comfort and convenience, but 
more efficient service. 

During the last fiscal year the addition of needed improvements, the 
abandonment of obsolete machinery, and the reclamation of room, have 
added greatly to the convenience of business and the efficiency of the 
mint. 

Aside from the purchase of new machinery, most of these improve- 
ments have been made by the mint force and at slight expense. 

A commodious room has been built on the top of the steel vault in 
the courtyard, which is used for the redemption, sorting, and counting 
of minor coins, while the space formerly occupied in the basement for 
this purpose has been utilized for temporary vaults for the storage of 
silver bars. 

The storage capacity has been further increased by lowering the 
floors of two old vaults to a level with the corridor, while vaults for the 
cashier and for the custody of silver coins received for recoinage have 
been constructed by lowering the floor of the custodian’s room and re- 
moving his office to the upper corridor. 

The rooms assigned the cashier and calculating clerks have been en- 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



99 



larged and greatly improved by removing the walls in the east and 
west corridors and inserting in place thereof glass partitions and coun- 
ters. This not only affords more space and light, but greater conven- 
ience to the public. 

In the coining department, a new set of steel rolls with the necessary 
shafting has been set up. 

The rolls used for finishing the strips were formerly obtained from 
Krupp, in Germany, but in late years he has declined to furnish them. 

American steel rolls have been tried with indifferent success, and 
recently the shrinkage of hardened sleeves over steel mandrils were 
tried, but with little satisfaction. 

It is therefore gratifying to report that new steel rolls, manufactured 
by the Tretheway Company, of Pittsburg, were secured during the past 
year, which have been found to do the work admirably. They are 
harder, and retain their face even better than the Krupp rolls, and are 
superior to any steel rolls yet used in the mint. 

Two additional recutting presses and a self-feeding cutting press 
have been added to the coining department. 

A new turning-up lathe has been put in plaee in the engraving de- 
partment, and in the machine shop a cutting-off lathe, an open side- 
planer, a twist drill-grinder, and an emery tool-grinder, all of the most 
approved make. 

A 25 horse power electric motor has been introduced, so that the 
machine shop, engraving department, hoisting machinery, and coining 
presses are now independent of steam-power. 

A new circular saw, with adjustable table, has been provided for the 
carpenter shop. 

Kew steam pumps of the best pattern, an improved exhaust head in 
steam pipes, improved methods of ridding the boilers from scale and 
for disposing of the hot water from condensed steam, have been intro- 
duced in the engineer’s department. 

The furniture of the mint has been overhauled and repaired, and the 
entire buildifig has been thoroughly cleaned and brightened up. 

The following table exhibits approximately the value of foreign coins 
deposited at the mint at Philadelphia during the last fiscal year: 

Foreign Gold and Silver Coins Melted at the Mint at Philadelphia, Fiscal 

Year 1891 . 



Countries of coinage. 


Value of 
gold coins. 


Value of 
silver coins. 


Total. 




$338.72 




$338.72 
105.60 
1, 640. 68 
1,097. 01 




$105. 60 
1, 640. 68 
720.46 


Mexico 




Mixed pieces 


37G. 55 


Total 


715.27 


2, 466. 74 


3, 182. 01 





Digitized by 



100 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



At the close of the fiscal year the bullion and coin in the mint at 
Philadelphia were weighed under the supervision of Mr. Cabell White- 
head, of this Bureau, who reported in writing that they had found on 
hand all the public money with which the superintendent was charged. 

The following table exhibits the denominations of domestic gold coins 
deposited at the mint at Philadelphia, during the last fiscal year: 

% 

United States Gold Coin Melted at the Mint at Philadelphia, Fiscal 

Yeah 1891. 



Double eagles 

Eagles 

Half eagles 

Quarter eagles 

Three-dollar pieces 
Dollars 

Total 



Denominations. 



Value. 



$51,680.00 

42. 690. 00 

38. 730. 00 

10. 190. 00 
69.00 

495. 00 

143, 854. 00 



The following table exhibits the denominations of domestic silver 
coins melted at the mint at Philadelphia, during the last fiscal year: 

United States Silver Coin Melted at the Mint at Philadelphia, Fiscal 

Year, 1891. 



Denominations. 



Value. 



Dollars coined prior to 1878 

Standard dollars 

Trade dollars 

Half dollars 

Quarter dollars 

Twenty -cent pieces 

Dimes 

Half dimes 

Three-cent pieces 

Total 



$4, 254. 00 
8, 412. 00 
970.00 

253. 183. 00 

323. 445. 00 
1,807.20 

85, 758. 60 
13, 563. 90 
944. 07 

092, 337. 77 



Digitized by- tjOOQle 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 101 

The expenditures for the different classes of supplies at the mint at 
Philadelphia during the past fiscal year were as follows : 

Expenditures at the Mint at Philadelphia for the Fiscal Year, 1891. 



Expenditures for supplies. 


General department. 


Assayer’s 

Depart- 

ment. 


Coiner’s 

depart- 

ment. 


Melter and refiner’s 
department. 


Engrav- 
er’s de- 
partment. 


Proper. 


Mechan- 
ical. # 


Proper. 


Refinery. 








$131.63 
144. 45 






$3, 743. 61 


















$556. 82 


- 


$1.94 


$18.60 
534.93 
138. 43 
1, 823. 29 
9, 695. 00 

2,042.23 
163. 52 
17. 70 












647. 63 
63.89 




$174. 13 








101. 87 


1, 240. 36 
110.00 




3, 857. 57 


$22.00 












Crucibles, covers, stirrers, 
and dippers 






6.00 
4. 32 




146. 97 
38. 82 
208.63 




Dry goods 


192. 64 


10. 11 


114. 76 


.11 


Fluxes 




26. 43 
7, 963. 91 






134.92 


Gas and electric lighting.. 
Gloves and gauntlets 














1.50 

.75 


3, 320. 29 
97. 27 


1, 303.42 
56. 39 


13. 04 




Hardware 


805. 32 
1, 019. 02 
427.-72 
384.41 
244.82 
2, 205. 18 

6. 936. 85 

2. 474. 86 
45.15 


10.00 




Ice 


121. 83 




Iron and steel 


6. 20 




172. 54 
434. 15 


35.16 

2.50 


401. 46 


Labor and repairs 






Loss on sale of sweeps 






238.46 J 




Lumber 






20. 51 
6, 889. 63 
346.44 
231. 83 






Machinery and appliances. 
Metal work and castings. . . 
Oils 




380. 08 


231. 00 

108.00 
163. 15 




310.00 
8. 75 
.26 


30.00 

70.87 


40.25 


.40 

.68 


Salt 


120. 70 


Stationery, printing, and 
binding 




377. 25 
25, 976. 19 
21. 37 
91.43 
548.00 




12. 00 
2, 777. 39 


7.50 
815. 10 




Sundries 


36.94 


249.64 


115. 95 


352. 39 


Telegraphing 


Washing 




18. 50 










Water 












Wood 






3, 840. 90 








Zinc 










1, 585. 61 




Total 














54, 154. 94 
23, 506. 50 
122, 934. 73 


186. 12 


1, 039. 82 
4,966.78 
12,430. 74 


19,744.93 
4, 891. 28 
200,158.64 


17, 155. 72 
5, 000. 00 
54, 397. 78 


7, 085. 39 


1, 247. 10 
3, 000. 00 
11, 215. 36 


Salaries 


Wages of workmen 


16, 313. 45 


12, 334. 44 


Total 


200, 596. 17 


16, 499. 57 


18,437.34 


224,794.85 


76, 553. 50 


19, 419. 83 


‘ 15,462.46 





Digitized by 



Google 




102 REPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

Expenditures at tiie Mint at Philadelphia, Fiscal Year 1891 — Continued. 

SUMMARY. 



Expenditures for supplies. 



Total. 



Expenditures for supplies. 



Total. 



Adds 

Assayer’s materials 

Belting 

Charcoal 

.Chemicals 

Coal 

Copper 

Crucibles, covers, stirrers, and dippers. 

Drygoods 

Fluxes 

Freight and dray age 

Gas and electric lighting 

Gloves and gauntlets 1 

Hardware 

Ice 

Iron and steel 

Labor and repairs 

Loss on sale of sweeps 



$3, 875. 24 
144.45 
577. 36 
1, 356. 69 
1,544. 55 
5,812.86 
9, 695. 00 
2, 195. 20 
524.28 
226. 33 
161. 35 



Lumber 

Machinery and appliances 

Me % tal work and castings 

Oils 

Salt + 

Stationery, printing, and binding 

Sundries 

Telegraphing 

Washing 

Water 

Wood 



$2, 225.69 
14, 747. 56 
3,008.30 
511.66 
121.38 
396. 75 
30, 323. 60 
21. 37 
109.93 
548.00 
3, 840. 90 



7, 963. 91 
4, 638. 25 
969. 53 
1, 140. 85 
1, 043. 08 
821.06 
483. 28 



Zinc 

Total 

Salaries 

Wages of workmen 

Total 



1, 585. 61 

100, 614. 02 
41, 364. 56 
429, 785. 1.4 

571, 763. 72 



Remarks. — “Assayer’s materials” include matrasses, pipettes, dishes, etc.; “Drygoods” include 
cost of material for mittens, sleeves, toweling, coin sacks, scale covers, etc.; “Labor and repairs” in- 
cludes only temporary labor on repairs; “Sundries” includes only such items as can not readily be 
classified. 



MINT AT SAN FRANCISCO. 

The weight and value of the gold and silver received at the mint at 
San Francisco, during the fiscal year 1891, was: 



Metal. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Value. 


Gold 


3,159, 397. 979 
8, 756,489.60 


$21, 570, 19*. 95 
30, 189, 369. 71 

31,759, 564.66 




Total 







The melter and refiner received, during the fiscal year, bullion con- 
taining 2,283,251 standard ounces of gold. 

There were made 766 melts of gold ingots, of which 3 tyere condemned. 

The melter and refiner returned to the superintendent, at the close of 
the fiscal year, in settlement of his accounts, an excess of 806.219 stand- 
ard ounces of gold, valued at $14,999.42. 

The same officer received, during the year, bullion containing 
17,360,638 standard ounces of silver. There were made 9,625 melts of 
silver ingots, of which 17 were condemned. 

The melter and refiner returned to the superintendent, at the close 
of the fiscal year, in settlement of his silver accounts, a surplus of 
1,575.29 standard ounces, of the cost value of $1,426.57. 



Digitized by U.ooQLe 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 103 

The operations of the refinery embraced 226,147 standard ounces of 
gold and 1,487,305 standard ounces of silver. 

There were manufactured during the year 171 fine silver bars, of the 
value of $222,420.47. 

The number of melts of ingots made and condemned at this mint 
each fiscal year since 1874 is presented in the following table: 



Melts of Ingots Made and Condemned at the Mint at San Francisco, from 

1874 to 1891. 





Gold-ingot melts. 


Silver-ingot melts. 




Made. 


Condemned. 


Made.. 


Condemned. 


1874 


813 


5 


2,648 


10 


1875 


925 


13 


4,378 


15 


187G 


942 


6 


9,454 


11 


1877 


1,141 


3 


13, 210 


8 


1878 


1,393 


19 


13, 610 


14 


1879 


981 


4 


12, 789 


14 


1880 


931 


3 


8,104 


14 


1881-.... 


1,033 


8 


12, 617 


38 


1882 


958 


8 


10, 719 


20 


1883 


901 


5 


7, 509 


12 


1884 


767 


4 


5, 539 


1 


1885 


677 


1 


2,619 




1886 


935 








1887 


958 


2 


1,086 




1888 

• 


890 


3 


2, 821 


4 


1889 


777 


4 


319 




1890 


714 


3 


5, 187 


2 


1891 


766 


3 


9,625 


17 


Total 


16, 502 


94 


122, 234 


180 


Condemned, per cent 




.0057 




.0015 





104 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The coiner received from the superintendent, during the fiscal year, 
2,206,879 standard ounces of gold ingots, and manufactured $21,460,000 
in double eagles. 

The proportion of finished coin produced from gold ingots operated 
upon was 52.1 per cent. 

The wastage of gold in the mechanical operations of the mint was 
47.822 standard ounces, of the value of $889.71, a little over 4 per cent 
of the legal allowance. 

The coiner received from the superintendent, 15,956,276 standard 
ounces of silver ingots, and manufactured into coin 9,350,373 silver dol- 
lars and $211,919 in dimes, a total of 11,469,565 pieces, of the nominal 
value of $9,562,292.20. 

The proportion of finished coin produced from silver ingots operated 
upon was 51.1 per cent against 47.3 per cent in the preceding fiscal year 

The silver wastage in the mechanical operations of the mint was 
2,619.30 standard ounces, of the value of $2,372.03. 

The operations of the coining branch of the mint at San Francisco 
for a series of years are exhibited in the following table: 



Operations of the Coining Department of the Mint at San Francisco for 
the Nine Years Ending June 30 , 1891 . 



Fiscal years. 


Coinage. 


Per cent 
of fin- 
ished coin 
produced. 


Mechanical 

wastage. 


Gain. 


GOLD. 

1882-’83 


$26, 760, 000. 00 
23, 543, 500. 00 
20,857,500.00 
27,080,000.00 

22, 360, 000. 00 
22, 810, 000. 00 

23, 358, 500. 00 
17, 963, 000. 00 
21,460, 000.00 


64.7 
54.3 

54.7 

52.0 
47.5 
47.2 

52.1 

47.8 
52.1 


Standard ozs. 
134. 715 

120.300 
70. 337 
47. 018 


Standard ozs. 


1883-’84 




1884-’85 




1885-’86 




1886-’87 


19.540 


1887- 88 


64.248 
73. 942 
52. 780 
47. 822 


1888-’ 89 




1889-’90 




1890-’9l 




Tot, ill 




206, 192, 500. 00 




611. 162 


19.540 


SILVER. 

1882 ’83 




7, 350, 000. 00 
4, 850,000. 00 
2, 908, 799. 70 
49, 066. 20 
855, 812. 60 
2, 891,284.80 
375, 455. 40 
4, 694, 812. 40 
9, 562, 292. 20 


51.5 

52.5 

53.3 

52.8 

53.9 
47.8 

54.0 

47.3 

51.1 


638. 76 
618. 13 
192.00 
.58 
140.80 
' 851.01 
137.94 
1, 602. 59 
2, 619. 30 




] 883 ’84 




1884- 85 




1885~’86 




1886-’87 




1887 ’88 




1888-’89 




1889- 90 




1890-’91 




Total 




33, 537, 523. 30 




6,802.01 











Digitized by Google 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 105 

Ther following table exhibits tlie denominations of domestic gold coins 
melted at the mint at San Francisco during the last fiscal year: 



United States Gold Coins Melted at the Mint at San Francisco during 

the Fiscal Year 1891. 



Double eagles 

Eagles 

Half eagles 

Quarter eagles 

Tliree-dollar pieces 
Dollars 

Total 



Demominations. 



Value. 



$ 3, 160 
600 
1, 160 
205 
48 
16 

5, 189 



The following table exhibits the denominations of domestic silver 
coins melted at the mint at San Francisco during the last fiscal year: 



United States Silver Coin Melted at the Mint at San Francisco During 

the Fiscal Year 1891. 



Standard dollars . - - 

Trade dollars 

Half dollars 

Quarter dollars 

Twentycent pieces 

Dimes 

Half dimes 

Tbree-cent pieces . . 

Total 



Denominations. 



Value. 



$ 70. 00 
128.00 
167 , 204. 00 
33 , 145 . 50 
1.60 
25 , 134.00 
8.60 
.06 

225 , 691. 76 



Digitized by CaOOQle 





106 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT, 



The expenditures at the mint at San Francisco, for the different 
classes of supplies during the last fiscal year, were as follows: 

Expenditures at the Mint at San Francisco for the Fiscal Year 1891 . 



• 


General depart- 
ment. 


Assayer’s 


Coiner’s 


Melter and refiner’s 
department. 


Total. 


Expeuditu jToi b u ppl 10 ® ■ 


Proper. 


Mechani- 

cal. 


ment. 


ment. 


Proper. 


Refinery. 




Acids 






770. 78 


280.62 




16, 019. 77 


17, 071.17 


Assayer’s materials 






178.68 








178.68 


Belting 




121.90 




7. 03 






128. 93 


Charcoal 








15.00 


1, 044. 86 


354. 13 


1, 413. 99 


Chemicals 


232. 11 


405.00 


66. 16 


633. 60 


218. 09 


250. 72 


1, 805. 68 


Coal 


401. 06 


8, 008. 16 








5,395.28 


13, 804. 50 


Coke 










2, 339. 87 


279. 53 


2, 619. 40 


Copper 

Crucibles, covers, stirrers 










7, 000. 00 


1,694.00 


8, 694. 00 


and dippers 






15.00 




1,256. 94 


677.04 


1,948.98 


Dry goods 


231. 13 




3. 14 


77. 35 


188.00 


678.85 


1, 178. 47 


Freight and drayage 


1, 026. 02 








280.99 




1, 307. 01 


Gas 


1,591.00 










839.00 


2, 430. 00 


Gloves and gauntlets 


188.50 







2, 887. 50 


307.00 


359. 50 


3, 742. 50 


Hardware 


155. 86 










62.00 


217. 86 


Ice 


433. 95 










101. 86 


535. 81 


Iron and steel 




63.08 




237. 13 


68. 76 


127. 14 


496.11 


Labor and repairs 


863.60 


1,531.68 


421.62 


616.90 


528. 10 


846. 67 


4, 808. 57 


Lumber 




704. 86 




30. 50 




289. 77 


1, 025. 13 


Machinery and appliances . 


78. 25 


167. 73 




531. 35 


50.80 




828. 13 


Metal work and castings. . . 


1 


27. 48 


6. 24 


425. 91 


233. 27 


703.65 


1, 396. 55 


Oils 


68.00 


330. 40 




156.96 


216. 13 


187. 19 


958. 68 


Salt 






2. 87 






537. 31 


540. 18 


Sewing 

Stationery, printing and 


383. 38 








2, 087. 18 


780.15 


3, 250. 71 


binding 


657. 86 




4.00 




30. 20 




692.06 


Sundries 


477.99 


23.00 


4. 45 


324. 93 


420.04 


256. 61 


1, 507. 02 


Telegraphing 


166. 40 












166.40 


Washing 


724.02 










60.00 


784.02 


Water 


400.00 


333. 75 








285.25 


1, 019. 00 


Wood 


318.24 


224. 64 




2, 746. 00 




402. 48 


3, 691. 36 


Zinc 












2, 130. 66 


2, 130. 66 


Lead 






47. 50 


129. 36 


59. 78 


855. 02 


1,091.66 


Tools 




170. 43 


30.00 


93. 18 


36. 20 




329. 81 


Total 


8, 397. 37 


12, 112. 11 


1,550.44 


9, 193. 32 


16, 366.21 


34,173.58 


81, 793. 03 


Salaries 


24, 500. 00 




6,600.00 


5,000.00 


5, 000. 00 




41, 100. 00 


Wages of workmen 


48, 365. 00 


21, 736. 63 


23, 985. 50 


88, 292. 73 


28, 486. 00 


30, 813. 50 


241, 679. 36 


Total 


81, 262. 37 


33, 848. 74 


32, 135. 94 


102, 486. 05 


49, 852. 21 


64,987.08 ; 


1 364, 572. 39 



Remarks. — “ Assayer’s materials ” include matresses, pipettes, dishes, etc.; “drygoods” include 
cost of material for mittens, sleeves, toweling, coin sacks, scale covers, etc. ; “labor and repairs ” in- 
cludes only temporary labor on repairs ; “ sewing ” includes the making of mittens, sleeves, coin sacks, 
scale covers, towels, etc. ; “ sundries ” includes only such items as can not readily be classified. 

At the close of the fiscal year the bullion and coin in the mint were 
weighed under the supervision of Mr. William E. Morgan, of this Bureau, 

/ 



Digitized by Google 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 107 

who reported that he found on hand all the public money with which 
the superintendent was charged. 

Under the act making appropriations for sundry civil expenses of the 
Government for fiscal year 1890, two steel vaults constructed under con- 
tract made February 24, 1890, have been completed. 

One of the vaults is 29 feet 4 inches long, 17 feet 9 inches wide, and 
11 feet 10 1 inches high, containing 6,199 cubic feet; and the other 20 
feet 3£ inches long, 17 feet 9 inches wide, and 11 feet 10£ inches high, 
containing 4,288 cubic feet. 

The storage capacity of these vaults is about 42,000,000 silver dollars 
in sacks of $1,000 each. 

The vaults are lined with three layers of three-eighths inch steel, 
5-ply welded steel, and iron and Bessemer ductile steel, and furnished 
with outer and inner doors. The outer door is single, made of six layers 
of one-half inch welded steel, iron and ductile steel, fitted with bolts 
made of 7-ply welded chrome steel and iron. The inner door is folding, 
made of four layers of the same material, all hardened drill, saw, and file 
proof, and each fitted with four tumbler combination locks. 

The total cost of the vaults was $25,196. One of these vaults is at 
present used for the storage of silver dollars, and the other for the 
storage of silver bars. 

During the past year the old sidewalks around the mint have been 
removed and replaced by patent cement sidewalks. 

MINT AT NEW ORLEANS. 

The precious metals received at the mint at New Orleans during the 
last fiscal year, were as follows : 



Metal. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Value. 


Gold 


6, 933. 067 
11,164,622. 11 


$128, 987. 29 
12, 991, 560. 27 






Total 




13, 120, 547. 56 




! 



The work of the assay department consisted of 14,411 silver assays 
and 667 gold assays, a total of 15,078 assays. 

The melter and refiner received, during the fiscal year, 45,105 stand- 
ard ounces of gold, melted for ingots 13,546 ounces, and returned to the 
superintendent at the close of the year, in settlement of his accounts, a 
surplus of 5.646 standard ounces of gold. 

The same officer operated upon 17,642,782 standard ounces of silver. 

He made 2,095 melts of ingots, of which 7 were condemned. 

He returned to the superintendent at the close of the year, in settle- 
ment of his silver accounts, a surplus of 1,903.65 standard ounces of 
silver. 



Digitized by v^ooQle 




108 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The operations of the coiner’s department during the fiscal year were 
confined exclusively to the manufacture of silver dollars. 

This Department operated upon 17,382,500 standard ounces of silver 
ingots and delivered to the superintendent 9,870,913 silver dollars, being 
48.8 per cent of finished coin produced from ingots operated upon. 

The mechanical wastage was 3,417.63 standard ounces, or about 19.63 
per cent of his legal allowance. 

The following table exhibits the denominations of United States gold 
coins melted at the mint at New Orleans during the last fiscal year: 

United States Gold CoIns Melted at the Mint at New Orleans during 

the Fiscal Year 1891. 



Denominations. 



Value. 



Double eagles 

Eagles 

‘Half eagles 

Tbree-dollar pieces 

Quarter eagles 

Dollars 



$4, 040. 00 
3, 770. 00 
14, 705. 00 

72.00 
1, 788. 50 

21.00 



Total 



24, 450. 50 



The following table exhibits the denominations of domestic silver 
coins melted at the mint at New Orleans during the last fiscal year : 



United States Silver Coins Melted at the Mint at New Orleans During 

the Fiscal Year 1891. 



Trade dollars 

Dollars 

Half dollars 

Quarter dollars 

Twenty-cent pieces 

Dimes 

Half dimes 

Three-cent pieces . - 

Total 



Denominations. 




Value. 



$26, 00 

254.00 

176.00 

197.00 
1.00 

284.60 

46.85 



985. 75 



Digitized by tjOOQle 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



109 



The expenditures at the mint of New Orleans for the different classes 
of supplies during the last fiscal year are exhibited in the following 
table : 



Expenditures at the Mint at New Orleans, for the Fiscal Year 1891. 



Expenditures for supplies. 


General depart- 
ment. 


Assayer’s 

depart- 

ment. 


Coiner’s 

depart- 

ment. 


Melter and refiner’s 
department. 


Total. 


Proper. 


Mechan- 

ical. 


Proper. 


Refinery. 








$18. 92 
224. 87 


$19. 15 




$144.96 


$183. 03 
224. 87 
281.09 
818. 62 
1, 849. 56 
2, 964. 16 

1. 813. 00 

8. 816. 00 

1. 072. 00 
806, 12 
113. 03 

1,684. 38 

1.008.00 
392. 94 

1, 273. 29 
309. 58 
2,201.63 
26. 57 
348. 79 

5. 214. 00 
1, 120. 44 

432,39 

5.70 

84.05 

301. 85 
4, 635. 47 
151. 15 

1. 500. 00 
2,718.20 

8. 17 














$281. 09 






■ 






' 


$818. 62 
120. 66 










1 


1,728.90 










2, 964. 16 


1 












1, 813. 00 
8. 816. 00 

X, 072. 00 
200. 10 
















Crucibles, covers, stiirera, 














$150. 12 
90. 69 
1, 684. 38 






455.90 
17. 19 




Freight and dray age 




3.65 


1.50 








804.00 


204.00 






392. 94 
410. 00 












63.29 


528.92 




271.08 




Iron and steel 


309. 58 
1, 061. 78 




Labor and repairs 






.645, 55 


494. 30 





Loss on sale of sweeps 






26.57 


Lumber 




348. 79 
2,744.47 
1, 050. 40 
288. 14 








Machinery and appliances. 
Metal work and castings - . . 
Oils 






2, 319. 03 
28.40 
108. 07 


150.50 
41.64 
36. 18 




Salt 






5. 70 


Sewing 


33.05 

298. 35 
3, 449. 09 
124. 15 






15.00 


36.00 


Stationery, printing, and 
binding 




3. 50 




Sundries 




838.88 
27. 00 


241.40 


106. 10 


Washing 






Water 


1, 500. 00 








Wood 






2, 698. 50 




19. 70 
8. 17 


Zinc 










Total 

Salaries 












6, 632. 77 
17, 108. 77 
40, 627. 52 


10, 548. 41 


314. 23 
6, 000. 00 
4, 225. 50 


10, 234. 49 
4, 400. 00 
60, 978. 23 


14,315.48 
4, 400. 00 
21, 096. 44 


312.70 


42, 358. 08 
31,908. 77 
127, 209. 61 


Wages of workmen 

Total 


281.92 




64, 369. 06 


10, 830. 33 | 10, 539. 73 


75,612.72 j39, 811. 92 


312. 70 


J201, 476. 46 



Remarks. — “Assayer’s materials” include matrasses, pipettes, dishes, etc.; “ Dry goods ” include 
cost of material for mittens, sleeves, toweling, coin sacks, scale covers, etc.; “Labor and repairs” in- 
clude only temporary labor on repairs; “Sewing ” includes the making of mittens, sleeves, coin sacks, 
scale covers, towels, etc. ; “ Sundries ” includes only such items as can not readily be classified. 



J. Cecil Legar4 was appointed by the President to be Melter and Refiner 
of the mint, vice Leonard Magruder, and took charge May 1, 1891. 

Arsemus R. Burkdoll was appointed by the President to be Coiner of 
the mint, vice Allen Thomas, and entered upon office May 1, 1891. 



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110 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The bullion in the possession of the operative officers was weighed by 
Mr. B. F. Butler, the computer of this Bureau, and the wastages of the 
outgoing officers ascertained and declared. 

MINT AT CARSON. 

The deposits at the mint at Carson, during the fiscal year 1891, were 
as follows: 



Metal. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Value. 


Gold 


87, 051. 180 
2, 089, 954. 660 


$1, 619, 556. 94 
2, 431,947. 23 


Silver 


Total 


2, 177, 005.846 


4, 051, 504. 17 





The melter and refiner received, during the year, bullion containing 
276,851 standard ounces of gold. 

There were made 102 melts of gold ingots, of which 12 were con- 
demned. 

The melter and refiner returned to the superintendent, at the close of 
the fiscal year, in settlement of his gold accounts, an excess of 225.921 
standard ounces. 

The same officer received, during the year, bullion containing 3,965,587 
standard ounces of silver, from which were made 1,688 melts of silver 
ingots, of which 26 were condemned, and 374 fine silver bars, valued at 
$616,479.45. 

There was a silver wastage of 3,458.26 standard ounces. 

The wastage of silver by the melter and refiner was due in part to the 
large number of fine silver bars manufactured, but largely to the fact 
that a lot of base silver bullion, the accumulation of two years, was 
worked up. 

The coiner received from the superintendent 230,402 standard ounces 
of gold ingots, from which were coined double eagles of the value of 
$593,880, eagles of the value of $702,320, and half eagles of the value 
of $879,000; a total of 275,726 pieces, of the value of $2,175,200. 

The proportion of finished coin produced from ingots operated upon 
was 50.7 per cent. 

The gold wastage in the mechanical operations was 10.101 standard 
ounces, valued at $187.93, being less than 1 per cent of the legal allow- 
ance. 

The coiner received from the superintendent 3,228,681 standard ounces 
of silver ingots. 

There were coined and delivered to the superintendent, 2,109,041 stand- 
ard silver dollars. 

The proportion of silver coin produced from ingots operated upon was 
56.1 per cent, a very large percentage. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. Ill 

The silver wastage in the mechanical operations was 435.21 standard 
ounces, costing $390.62. 

The expenditures at the mint at Carson for the different classes of 
supplies during thb fiscal year 1891 were as follows : 



Expenditures at the Mint at Carson for the Fiscal Year 1891. 



Expenditures for supplies. 


General 

department 


Assayer’s 

depart- 


Coiner’s 

depart- 


Melter and refiner’s de- 
partment. 


Total. 




proper. 


ment. 


ment. 


Proper. 


Refinery. 




Acids 




$184.80 






$13, 879. 16 


$14,063.96 


Charcoal 


$2, 937. 48 








256.20 


3, 193. 68 


Chemicals 


26. 50 


18. 55 




$110. 15 




155.20 


Coal 


31. 05 






170.00 




201.05 


Coke 


1, 050. 00 










1, 050.00 


Copper 

Crucibles, covers, stirrers. 


1, 550. 00 






780.00 


6, 470. 00 


8, 800.00 


and dippers 


126. 10 


245. 39 


$170. 16 


1, 371. 37 




1,913.02 


Dry goods 


102. 85 




35.62 


82.56 


38.24 


259.27 


Freight and dray ago 


1, 719. 87 








2, 277. 85 


3,997.72 


Gas 


1, 024. 80 










1,024.80 


Gloves and gauntlets 


173. 00 




653.47 


167.00 


172.54 


1, 166.01 


Hardware 


890. 35 


39.70 


1,587.63 


368. 27 


1,612.30 


4,498.25 


Ice 


273. 18 










273. 18 


Iron and steel 


5. 58 










5.58 


Labor and repairs 


128.60 








299.00 


427.60 


Loss on sale of sweeps 


289.44 








409.93 


699. 37 


Lumber 


89. 42 




7. 15 




136.83 


233.40 


Oils 


7.75 


13. 75 


6. 75 


21.00 




49.25 


Salt ^ 

Stationery, printing, and 




3.50 






18.00 


21.50 


binding 


204.63 






10. 15 




214. 78, 


Sundries 


1, 427. 79 


56.40 


282.29 


1,695.64 


638. 20 


4, 100. 32 


Washing 


411. 51 










411. 51 


Water 


1, 113. 31 








77.50 


1, 190. 81 


Wood 


5, 110. 61 








344.50 


5,455.11 


Zinc 










60. 17 


60.17 


Total 


18, 693. 82 


562. 09 


2, 743. 07 


4, 776. 14 


26, 690. 42 


53, 465.54 


Salaries 


29, 550. 00 










29,550.00 


Wages of workmen 


37,488.57 


5, 947. 00 


26, 212. 50 


8, 983. 50 


9, 045.50 


87, 677. 07 


Total 


85, 732. 39 


6,509.09 


28, 955. 57 


13,759.64 


35, 735.92 


170, 692. 61 



Remarks. — “D ry goods” include cost of material for mittens, sleeves, toweling, coin-sacks, scale 
covers, etc.; “labor and repairs” includes only temporary labor on repairs; “sundries” includes 
only such items as can not readily be classified. 



At the close of the fiscal year the bullion and coin in the mint were 
weighed under the supervision of Mr. William E. Morgan of the mint 
Bureau, who reported that he found on hand all the bullion and coin 
with which the superintendent was charged. 



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112 



REPORT OR THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



ASSAY OFFICE AT NEW YORK. 

The business of the United States assay office at New York during 
the fiscal year 1891 is exhibited in the following table: 



Character. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Value. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Value. 


Bullion deposited 

Partings 

Total 

Bars prepared by inelter and refiner: 

Fine 

Mint 

Standard 

Unparted 

Total 


1,268,512.126 
84, 069. 538 


$23, 600, 225. 59 
1,580,828. 62 


6, 431, 031. 97 
104, 829. 93 


$7, 483, 382. 65 
121,983.92 


1,353,481.664 


25, 181,054. 21 


6,535,861.90 


| 7,605,366.57 


1, 195, 803. 207 
212, 254. 275 
16, 773. 237 
11. 184 


22, 247, 501. 53 
3, 948, 916. 75 
312, 060. 22 
208. 07 


4, 304, 883. 64 
152, 868. 64 
54, 695. 74 
1,898, 985. 17 


5, 009, 319. 14 
177, 883. 51 
63, 645. 95 
2, 209, 728. 20 


1, 424, 841. 903 


26, 508, 686. 57 


6,411,433. 19 


7, 460, 576. 80 



The work of the assay department for the fiscal year comprised the 
testing of some 13,000 melts of bullion, upward of 500 barrels of sweeps, 
the making of 65,000 cupels, and the stamping of nearly 70,000 bars; 
also many hundred special assays. 

The principal improvement in this department during the year was 
the introduction of an electric motor plant. 

The amount of bullion operated upon in the acid refinery during the 
fiscal year was 686,101 standard ounces of gold and 3,472,898 of silver. 
The result of the year’s work was a surplus of 603.0 # 85 ounces of gold 
and 2,034.18 of silver. 

A feature of the business not much regarded by the general public 
is worthy of attention, both as an economy, and as indicating the 
great progress effected, in recent years, in the refineries of gold and 
silver ore established in the United States. Formerly the sweepings 
recovered were sold at an average deduction of about 4£ cents per pound 
from assay value, and were shipped abroad for reduction. Not only has 
the shipment abroad ceased, but the average deduction from assay value, 
made by domestic refineries in buying, has been reduced to about 1£ 
cents. As 460 barrels of sweeps, containing nearly 200,000 pounds net, 
were sold from this institution alone during the year, some idea maybe 
formed of the immense saving throughout the country effected by the 
improvement in refining base bars and bullion. 

At the close of the year the gold and silver bullion was weighed and 
the coin examined by Messrs F. P. Gross, adjuster of this Bureau, and 
H. C. Stier, of the First Auditor’s Office, Treasury Department, who 
reported that they found on hand all the bullion and coin with which the 
superintendent was charged. . • 

The expenditures of the assay office at New York for the different 
classes of supplies are exhibited in the following table: 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT, 



113 



Expenditures at the Assay Office at New York for the Fiscal Year 1891. 



Expenditures for supplies. 


General 

department 

proper. 


Assayer’s 

depart- 

ment. 


Melter and refiner’s 
department. 


Total. 


Proper. 


Refinery. 






$403.95 
545. 31 
29. 17 




$13, 485. 36 


$13, 889. 31 
545. 31 
66.04 

937.20 
131. 10 

2,734.58 
8, 094. 91 
2,627.47 
1, 017.77 
2, 528.03 
239.90 
2, 260. 61 
289.82 
73. 61 
221.26 
4, 503. 51 
519.92 
1, 099. 23 
665. 78 
192. 41 
228. 52 

205. 50 
214. 40 

1,952. 83 
30.65 
1,037. 45 

337. 50 
210.00 

7, 078. 20 

233.00 

205.20 
1,800.00 

862.50 

460. 00 














36. 87 
937.20 
120.79 
2,734.58 
8,094.91 
2, 616. 47 
971. 03 
2, 528. 03 

224.00 
1, 166. 12 

289.82 
15. 01 
101.84 
2, 807. 62 
519. 92 

755. 01 
665. 78 
165. 16 
228.52 
205. 50 












10. 31 






















11.00 
15. 30 






$31.44 










15.90 
506. 37 








588. 12 










4. 10 
119. 42 
1, 504. 49 


54.50 










191.43 








Machinery and appliances 


91.01 


253. 21 




Metal work and castings 




Oils 


27.25 






Eire brick 






Sewing 








Stationery, printing, and binding 


214.40 
860.66 
30. 65 






Sundries 


291.09 




801. 08 


Telegraphing 




Barrels, tierces, and cooperage 






1, 037. 45 
337.50 
210.00 
6, 815. 51 


Water 








Wood 








Steam 


862.69 
194. 00 
205. 20 
1, 800. 00 






Adjusting and repairing balances 


39.00 




Advertising 






Bullion balances (large) 








Electric motors 


862.50 

112.50 






Gas furnaces 






347.50 


Total 






6, 467. 58 
22, 550. 00 
12, 116. 75 


3, 407. 39 
11, 200. 00 
12, 520. 00 




48, 218. 58 


58, 093. 55 
39, 250. 00 
71, 730. 27 


Salaries 


$5, 500.00 


Wages of workmen 


47,093.52 


Total 




41, 134. 33 


27, 127. 39 


5, 500.00 


95, 312. 10 


169, 073. 82 





Remabks. — “Assayer’s materials” include matrasses, pipettes, dishes, etc.; “dry goods” include 
cost of material for mittens, sleeves, toweling, coin sacks, scale covers, etc.; “labor and repairs” in 
eludes only temporary labor on repairs; “sewing” includes the making of mittens, sleeves, coin sacks 
scale covers, towels, etc. ; “Sundries” includes only such items as can not readily be classiiied. 

* 10285 m 8 



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114 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The value and classification of the foreign gold coins deposited and 
melted at the assay office at New York are exhibited in the following 
table : 

Foreign Gold and Silver Coins Melted at the United States Assay Office 
at New York during the Fiscal Year 1891. 



Country of coinage. 


Gold: 


Silver (coin- 
ing value). 


Bolivia, 20-cent pieces 




$1, 717.69 




$43, 431.55 
423, 365. 98 

214. 030. 21 

116.723.21 
65,159.48 


England 




France 










44, 582. 61 
1,044, 851.45 
66, 483. 82 


Mexico, dollars 


Peru 


28,044.58 
3, 189, 865. 84 
7, 681. 23 


Spain 


South America „ 


169, 890. 99 
966,869.43 
40, 641. 76 
2, 103.87 


South America, dollars 


Colombia 


133.52 


Colombia, half dollars 


Venezuela .... 


2, 078. 62 
271, 132. 62 

4 3fl1.fl4fi. H4. 


Mixed 


116, 406. 17 
,2 453. 547. 7» 


Total 




1 1 



The following table exhibits the denominations and value of the un- 
current gold coins of the United States melted at the assay office at 
New York during the fiscal year 1891: 



Uncurrent United States Gold Coins Melted at the United States Assay 
Office at New York during the Fiscal Year 1891: 



Denomination. 

i 


Amount. 




$100, 040. 00 

110.710.00 

163.470.00 
19, 800. 00 

339.00 

238.00 






Quarter eagles 


Three-dollar pieces 


Dollar pieces 


Total 


394, 597. 00 





MINT AT DENVER. 



The business of the mint at Denver, conducted as an assay office, 
during the last fiscal year, is exhibited for the last fiscal year in the 
following table : 



Items. 


Amount. 


Deposits 


$1, 203, 614. 89 
3, 583.88 


Earnings 


Expenses 


27,087.73 





Percentage of net expenses to deposits, 1.9. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



115 



The 5 horse power gas engine formerly in use has been supplanted 
by an electric motor of 1 horse power, which gives better satisfaction. 
Electric light for illuminating purposes has been introduced. 

The expenses for the different classes of supplies at the mint at Den- 
ver during the fiscal year were as follows : 

Expenditures at the Mint at Denver for the Fiscal year 1891. 



Expenditures for supplies. 


General department. 


Assayer’s 

depart- 

ment. 


Melterand 
refiner’s de- 
partment 
proper. 


Total. 


Proper. 


Mechan- 

ical. 






- 


$62.02 

62.20 




$62. 02 
160.45 

42.00 
209. 12 
140. 08 

15. 17 
685.50 
29. 45 
6. 40 
355. 18 

30.00 
3.60 

12.00 
48.88 

410. 81 
13. 70 
93. 00 
88. 87 
2. 65 
10.00 
12.60 









$98. 25 




$42.00 
209. 12 


















140. 08 




15.17 
19. 80 
29. 45 






Gas 


$198. 30 


233. 70 


233. 70 










6.40 
6. 25 
24. (Jb 




343.48 


5. 45 






6.00 


Oils 




3.60 


Sewing 






12.00 


Stationery, printing, and biuding 


* 48. 88 

393. 69 
13. 70 
93.00 
88. 87 






Sundries 

Washing 


.40 


.90 


15. 82 


Water 








Electric lighting 








Electric power 




1.32 


1.33 


Flag 


10.00 

12.60 




Advertising 








Total 

Salaries 









| 1, 319. 76 

4, 800. 00 
4, 459. 50 


207.75 J 


366. 14 
3, 900. 00 
5, 803. 75 


537. 83 

2. 250. 00 

3. 443.00 


2, 431. 48 
10, 950. 00 
13,706.25 


W ages of workmen 




Total . 




10, 579. 26 1 


207. 75 


10, 069. 89 


6, 230. 83 


27, 087. 73 





Remarks.— “ Labor and repairs” includes only temporary labor on repairs. “jSewing” includes the 
making of mittens, sleeves, coin sacks, scale covers, towels, etc. “ Sundries” includes only such items 
a s can not readily be classified. 



ASSAY OFFICE AT HELENA. 

The business of the assay office at Helena, Mont., for the fiscal year 
1891 is exhibited in the following table: 



Items. 



Amount. 



$968, 906. 10 
3, 251. 36 
24, 636, 82 



Percentage of net expenses to deposits, 2.2. 



Deposits . 
Earnings 
Expenses 



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116 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The expenditures of this office for the different classes of supplies 
during the fiscal year were as follows: 

Expenditures at the Assay Office at Helena for the Fiscal Year 1891 , 



Expenditures for supplies. 



Chemicals 

Coal 

Crucibles, covers, stirrers, and dippers . 

Freight and drayage 

Gas 

Gloves and gauntlets 

Ice 

Labor and repairs 

Lumber 

Machinery and appliances 

Oils v 

Stationery, printing, and binding 

Sundries 

Washing 

Water 

Wood 



Total 

Salaries 

Wages of workmen 

Total 



General de- 
partment 
proper. 


Melter and 
refiner’s 
department 
proper. 


Total. 


$20-25 




$20. 25 


130. 31 


$43.43 


173. 74 




28.50 


28.50 


66.54 




66.54 


802.23 


267.40 


1, 069. 63 




9.00 


9.00 


23. 98 




23. 98 


1, 237. 71 


238.00 


1, 475. 71 


13. 09 




13.09 


255. 00 




255.00 


18. 70 


9. 80 


28.50 


131.50 




131. 50 


728. 02 


227. 83 


955. 85 


14. 00 




14. 00 


74. 14 


74. 14 


148. 28 


43.50 


21.00 


64.50 


3, 558. 97 


919. 10 


4, 478. 07 


5, 321. 75 


2, 250. 00 


7,571.75 


9, 982. 50 


2, 604. 50 


12, 587. 00 


18, 803. 22 


5, 773. 60 


24, 636. 82 



Remarks. — “Labor and repairs” includes only temporary labor on repairs. “Sundries” includes 
only such items as can not readily be classified. 



ASSAY OFFICE AT BOIS^I CITY. 

The business of the assay office at Bois 6 City, Idaho, during the fiscal 
year 1891, is exhibited in the following table: 



Items. 


Amount. 


Deposits 


$698, 596. 06 
1, 860. 59 
10, 687. 90 


Earnings 


Expenses 





Percentage of net expenses to deposits, 1.2. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



117 



The expenses for the different classes of supplies during the fiscal 
year were as follows: 

Expenditures at the Assay Office at Bois£ City for the fiscal year 1891. 



Expenditures for supplies. 



Total. 



Acids 

Assayer’s materials 

Coal 

Coke 

Crucibles, covers, stirrers, and dippers 

Dry goods 

Fluxes 



$73.30 
36. 25 
172.20 
156.63 
54. 65 
16.34 
33.00 



Freight and drayage. 
Gas 



57. 94 
126.00 



Gloves and gauntlets 
Hardware 



5. 85 
85. 58 



Ice 

Labor and repairs . 

Lumber 

Oils 

Sewing 

Stationery, printing, and binding 

Suudries 

Telegraphing 

Washing 

Water 

Wood 

Total 

Salaries 

Wages of workmen 

Total 



50.00 
63. 75 
13.68 

7.50 
6. 76 
13. 21 
400. 76 

63.00 

18.00 
122. 00 



1, 630. 40 
3, 200. 00 
5, 857. 50 

10, 687. 90 



Remarks.— “ Assayer’s materials ” include matrasses, pipettes, dishes, etc. “Drygoods” include 
cost of material for mittens, sleeves, toweling, coin sacks, scale covers, etc. “Labor and repairs ” in- 
cludes only temporary labor on repairs. “Sewing” includes the making of mittens, sleeves, coin 
sacks, scale covers, towels, etc. “ Sundries ” includes only such items as can not be classified. 

ASSAY OFFICE AT CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

The business of the assay office at Charlotte, C., for the fiscal year 
1891 is exhibited in the following table: 



Items. 


Amount. 


Deposits 


$234, 276. 39 
1, 670. 35 
4, 749. 76 


Earnings 


Expenses 




Percentage of net expenses to deposits, 1. 3. 



Digitized by tjOOQle 




118 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The expenses for the different classes of supplies for the assay office 
at Charlotte, during the last fiscal year, are exhibited in the following 
table: 

Expenditures at the Assay Office at Charlotte for the Fiscal year 1891. 



Expenditures for supplies. 



Assayer’s materials 

Charcoal 

Chemicals 

Coal 

Crucibles, covers, stirrers, and dippers 

Dry goods 

Fluxes 

Freight and dray age 

Gas 

Gloves and guantlets 

Hardware 

Ice 

Labor and repairs 

Oils 

Stationery, printing, and binding 

Sundries 

Telegraphing and telephone 

Washing 

Wood. 

Total 

Salaries 

Wages of workmen 

Total 



Total. 



56.18 

104.04 

10.39 



19.47 
67.00 
2.29 
89.08 
2.00 
2. 75 
14. 03 
41.45 
4.65 
32 . 02 
147 . 51 



59 . 75 
882 . 86 

27750700 

1 , 116.90 

4 , 749. 76 



Remarks. — “A ssayer’s materials ” include matrasses, pipettes, dishes, etc.; “drygoods” include 
cost of material for mittens, sleeves, toweling, coin sacks, scale covers, etc.; ‘‘labor and repairs” in- 
cludes only temporary labor on repairs ; “sundries ” includes only such items as can not readily be 
classified. 



ASSAY OFFICE AT ST. LOUIS. 

The business of the assay office at St. Louis, Mo., during the fiscal 
year 1891, is exhibited in the following table : 



Items. 



Amount. 



Deposits (coining value) 

Earnings 

Expenditures 



$ 480 , 441. 26 
1 , 405. 09 
5 , 899.39 



Percentage of net expenses to deposits, nine-tenths of 1 per cent. 



The deposits for the preceding fiscal year aggregated $346,284.64, 
showing a gain in business of $134,156.62, or 38-^- per cent. 

Samples from twenty-seven shipments of Mexican ore were received 
from the United States surveyor of customs at St. Louis and were 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



119 



assayed for him. These assays require the determination (in triplicate) 
of the gold, silver, lead, and copper in each sample, and would have cost 
the Government $432 if paid for at the rates formerly charged in this 
office and prescribed by regulations then in force. No credit is taken 
for this in the earnings. 

There have been added to the equipment of the office during the year 
one 5 horse power Westinghouse standard automatic engine and two 
blowers. These are for use with the bench of gas furnaces purchased 
during the preceding fiscal year, and have been placed in the quarters 
which will be occupied by this office in the old custom-house building 
in this city when completed. 

The expenses of the assay office at St. Louis for the different classes 
of supplies during the last fiscal year were as follows : 

Expenditures at the Assay Office at St. Louis, for the Fiscal Year 1891 



Expenditures for supplies. 



Total. 



Acids 

Assayer’s materials 

Charcoal 

Chemicals 

Coal 

Crucibles, covers, stirrers, and dippers 

Dry goods 

Fluxes 

Freight and drayage 

Gas 

Hardware 



Lumber 

Machinery and appliances 

Stationery, printing, and binding 

Sundries 

Telegraphing and telephone 

Washing 

Rent 

Total 

Salaries 

Wages of workmen 

Total 

* 



$10. 92 

54.09 
21.60 

.60 

23.20 

60.19 
16. 40 

20. 10 

27. 19 
90.52 

4. 45 
10.60 
5.04 

311.00 
70.74 

150.69 

100.00 
18.00 

480.00 



1. 484. 39 

3^500.00 

915.00 

5. 899. 39 



Remarks. — “A ssayer’s materials ” include matrasses, pipettes, dishes, etc. ; “dry goods ” includecost 
of material for mittens, sleeves, toweling, coin sacks, scale covers, etc.; “ sundries” includes only such 
items as can not readily be classified* 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF S THE MINT. 



SUMMARY OF THE WORK OF MINOR ASSAY OFFICES* 

Tlie following table recapitulates the work of the minor assay offices, 
including the mint at Denver, for the fiscal year 1891 : 

Deposits, Earnings, and Expenditures of Minor Assay Offices, 1891. 



Institutions. 


Deposits. 


Earnings. 


1 

Expenses. 


Percentage 
of net 
expenses to 
deposits. 


Denver 


$1, 203, 614. 89 


$3, 583. 88 | 


| $27, 087. 73 


1.9 


Helena , 


968, 906. 10 


3, 251. 36 


24, 636. 82 


2.2 


Boise City 


698, 596. 06 


1, 860. 59 


10, 687. 90 


1.2 


Charlotte 


234, 276. 39 


1, 670. 35 


4, 749. 76 


1.3 


St. Louis 


480, 441. 26 


1,405.09 


5, 899. 39 


0.9 


Total 


3, 585, 834. 70 


11,771.27 


73, 061. 60 


1.7 



MONETARY STATISTICS OF FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 

The statistics of the coinage and production of the precious metals 
in foreign countries, publish ed annually in the reports of this Bureau, 
are obtained directly from the governments of such countries by our 
representatives abroad, a fact which invests them with the highest 
degree of reliability, and explains why it is that the reports of the 
Mint Bureau have come to be recognized, the world over, as the 
most exhaustive and trustworthy authority on the statistics relating to 
these subjects. 

The points on which information is sought are embodied in a set of 
questions in a circular sent through the Department of State to our 
diplomatic representatives abroad, and the answers are received in the 
form of a report direct to this Bureau. 

The questions covering the calendar year 1890 were as follows: 

(1) What was the amount of gold coined during the calendar year 1890 by denomi- 
nations and values? What amount was recoined (withdrawn from circulation) dur- 
ing the year, domestic and foreign coins separately ? 

(2) Same for silver. 

(3) What was the import and export of gold during the calendar year 1890? Coin, 
bullion, and ore should be given separately where practicable. 

(4) Same for silver. 

(5) What was the weight, expressed in kilograms, and the value of the gold pro. 
duced from the mines during the calendar year 1890? 

(6) Same for silver. 

(7) What, approximately, was the stock of gold coin and bullion in the country at 
the close of the calendar year 1890. 

(8) Same for silver. 

(9) What was the amount of Government and bank notes outstanding at the same 
date ? 

(10) Were any la\vs passed during the year 1890 affecting the coinage, issue, or 
legal-tender character of the metallic and paper circulation? If so, please transmit 
copies. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 121 

(11) In case the report of the operations of the mint is published, please forward 
a copy. 

These replies should be in the form of a report, written on one side of the paper 
only, and transmitted direct to the u Director of the Mint, Treasury Department, 
Washington, D. C.” 

Besides the information contained in the official answers to the above 
questions, the Bureau draws freely from other sources, especially printed 
documents — some official, others not — courteously transmitted to the 
Bureau by foreign governments. We have this year to express our 
acknowledgment for the receipt of: Twenty-first Annual Report of the 
Deputy Master of the Royal Mint, 1890, London, 1891; Mineral Sta- 
tistics of the United Kingdom for 1890, London, 1891; Summaries of 
the Statistical Portions of the Reports of Her Majesty’s Inspector of 
Mines, London, 1891 ; Report of Mr. C. Leneve Foster, Her Majesty’s 
Inspector of Mines, London, 1891; Government of India, Financial 
Statement, 1891-’92, Calcutta, 1891; Report on the Administration of 
the Mints at Bombay and Calcutta for the year 1889-’90, Calcutta, 1891 ; 
do. for 1890-’91; Finance and Revenue Accounts and Miscellaneous 
Statistics Relating to the Finances of British India, Part in, Calcutta, 
1891; Report of the Head Commissioner of Paper Currency, Calcutta, 
to the Secretary of the Government of India, for the year 1890-’91, 
Calcutta, 1891; Geological and ^Natural History Survey of Canada, 
Annual Report, new series, Yol. iv, 1888-’89, Montreal, 1890; Annual 
Report of the Secretary of Mines of Victoria during the year 1890, 
Melbourne, 1891; Australian Statistics 1889-’90, by T. A. Coglilan, 
Government Statistician, Sydney, 1890; Australian Insurance and 
Banking Record, 1891; Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society 
of New South Wales, Sydney, 1890; Chillagoe and Koorboora Mining 
Districts (Report of Robert L. Jack, Government Geologist); Report 
of the Director of the Imperial Mint of Japan, 1890; Repiiblica Mexi- 
cana, Koticias del Movimiento Marltimo en el ano fiscal de 1888 a 1889, 
Mexico, 1891 ; Agencia Mercantil de la Repiiblica Mexicana, Memoria 
Estadistica de los meses Julio (i Diciembre de 1890, Mexico, 1891; 
Republica Mexicana, Exportaciones en el aho Fiscal de 1889 4 1890, 
JSToticias formadas bajo la direecion de Javier Stavoli, Mexico, 1891; 
Monatshefte zur Statistik des Deutschen Reichs, Jahrgang 1891, Berlin, 
1891 ; Zeitschrift flir Berg-Hii^ten- und Salinen-Wesen im Preussischen 
Staate, Jahrgang 1891, Berlin, 1891 ; Bulletin de Statistique et de Legis- 
lation Compare, Paris, 1891; Annales des Mines, l e et 2 e livraisons 
de 1891, Paris, 1891; Revue des Banques, Paris, 1891; Algemeen Ver- 
slag van het Munt-College, over 1890, Amsterdam, 1891; Jaarcijfers 
over 1889 en vorige Jaren, Ko. 9, Amsterdam, 1891 ; Bidrag til Finlands 
Officiela Statistik, xvii Industrie-Statistik 5, Ar 1888, Helsingfors, 1891. 

The replies to the interrogatories, which are given in full in the Ap- 
pendix to this Report, are indicated by the numbers of the questions. 

A brief review of the most important facts contained in the various 
reports received is here appended : 



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122 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



GREAT BRITAIN AND BRITISH COLONIES. 

Great Britain and Irdand. 



Items reported for 1890. 


£. 


Value in 
United States 
money. 




7,680,156 
3, 248,437 


$37, 375, 479 
15, 808, 519 


Light gold coin recoined 




1, 712, 161 
296, 896 


8, 332, 232 
1,444.844 


Worn silver coin (recoinage) ' 


Gold imported 


23, 606, 128 


114, 879,222 


Gold exported 


14,309,626 


69, 637, 795 


Gain of gold by imports 


9, 296, 502 


45, 241, 427 


Silver imported 


13, 022, 891 
10,989, 895 

2, 032, 996 


63, 375, 899 
53,482, 324 

9, 893, 57a 


Silver exported 


Gain of silver by imports 


Gold produced from ores produced in the Kingdom 


675 


3,285 


Silver obtained from ores produced in the Kingdom 


58,024 


382, 374 


Estimated stock of precious metals in the Kingdom December 31, 1890: 
Gold 


105, 000, 000 
22,000,000 
40,962,791 


510, 982, 500 
107, 063, 000 
199, 345, 422 


Silver 


Note circulation •- 1 



The gold coinage of Great Britain in 1890 comprised, in addition to 
sovereigns, £1,121,600 in half sovereigns, the coinage of which had 
been practically suspended since 1885. 

Under the terms of the royal proclamation, dated November 26, 1890, 
issued in conformity with the coinage act of 1889, calling in the gold 
coins of former reigns, and declaring that such coins shall not be legal 
tender after February 28, 1891, the operations have resulted in the with- 
drawal from circulation of £2,334,573 in sovereigns and £128,575 in 
half sovereigns, a total of £2,463,148. 

The expeuses of the operation, which amounted to £51,299, are ex- 
hibited in the following table, presented in the report of the deputy 
master of the mint: 



Where withdrawn. 


Value of deficiency in weight. 


Value of deficiency in standard. 


Total 

value of de- 
ficiency. 


On sover- 
eigns. 


On half 
sover- 
eigns. 


Total. 


On sover- 
eigns. 


On halt- 
sover- 
eigns. 


Total. 


Bank of England : 

Light coins 

Eull weight 


£ 8. d. 
40, 919 17 00 
625 17 10 
222 06 04 
583 15 00 


£ 8. d. 

6, 210 05 1 
4 11 5 
34 09 8 
103 07 3 


£ 8. d. 

47, 130 02 1 
630 09 3 
256 16 0 
687 02 3 


£ s. d. 
2, 199 15 1 
155 17 7 


£8. d. 
125 13 3 
0 13 10 


£ 8 . d. 
2, 325 08 4 
156 11 5 


£ 8. d. 

49, 455 10 5 
787 0 8 
256 16 0 
737 10 1 


Australia: 

Sydney mint... 
Mel bourne 
mint 


47 06 7 


3 01 3 


50 07 10 


Total 


42, 351 16 02 


6, 352 13 5 


48,704 09 7 ,2,402 19 3 |129 08 4 


2, 532 07 7 


51, 236 17 2 

16 15 9 
46 01 4 




Incidental expenses at — 






Total expense 




51,299 14 3 





REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



123 



Of the silver coins struck during the year 1890, of the nominal value 
of £1,712,161, £249,465 were in crowns and £156,429 in double florins. 
The total issue of crowns and double florins since 1887 has been : 



Description. 


o | Value in U. S. 

' j money. 


Crowns 


790,885 
510, 625 


$3, 848, 842 
2, 484, 957 


Double florins 


Total 


1, 301, 510 


6, 333, 799 





The following table presented by the master of the mint is intended 
to show the proportion in which silver coins of the several denomina- 
tions exist in the currency of Great Britain and her colonies : 



Denominations. 


England and Wales. 


Scotland and Ireland. 


Colonies.* 


1890. 


1880-’89. 


1890. 


1880-’89. N 


1890. 


1880-’89. 


Crowns 


£226,000 


£484, 300 


£28,600 


£48, 750 


£335 


£2,900 




118,000 


320,600 


20, 100 


28, 815 




23, HO 


Half crowns 


281. 000 


1, 488, 200 


53,900 


433, 400 


48, 150 


488, 410 


Florins 


33,000 


698,800 


34,900 


330, 175 


112,880 


811, 005 


Shillings 


251,000 


751,500 


56, 700 


615,200 


136, 470 


920, 935 


Sixpences 


178,000 


756, 500 


23, 300 


149, 550 


34,660 


195, 675 


Threepences 


28, 175 


180,400 


7,500 


59, 150 


21,820 | 


1 168, 830 


Total 


1, 115, 175 


4,680,300 


225,000 


1, 565, 040 


354,315 


2, 610,865 


Withdrawals 


250,000 


1,914,700 


19,700 


572, 164 


27,197 


381, 002 


Net increase of currency 


865, 175 


2, 765, 600 


205, 300 


992, 876 ; 
. 


327, 118 

! 


2, 229, 863 



* Under*the heading “Colonies” is included all imperial coin shipped in aid of Treasury chests 
abroad. 

t Including fourpences of the value of £2,000 specially struck in 1888 for British Guiana. 



These statistics show a net increase of silver as currency within the 
st eleven years, as follows : 



Countries. 


£. 


Value in 
United States 
money. 




3, 630, 775 
1, 198, 176 
2, 556, 981 


$17, 669, 167 
5, 830, 923 
12,443,548 


In Scotland and Ireland 


In Colonies 


Total 


7, 385, 932 


35, 943, 638 





Colonial coinages were executed at the Boyal mint as follows : 



For Hong-Kong, in silver pieces of 20, 10, and 5 cents $250, 000 

For Hong-Kong, in half dollars 25, 000 

Total 275,000 

For Newfoundland, in silver pieces of 20, 10, and 5 cents 38, 000 



The colonial coinages struck by u The Mint Birmingham” were as 
follows: 



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124 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



For Hong-Kong, a silver coinage of $155,000 in 50, 25, 10, and 5-cent 
pieces; for the British East Africa Company a silver coinage amount- 
ing to 61,116 rupees ($28,951). 

Australasia . — The coinage at the mint at Melbourne, during the year 
1890, all sovereigns, was £2,473,537, and of the mint at Sydney 
£2,808,000, all in sovereigns, a total gold coinage for Australia of 
£5,281,537. 

Light-weight gold coins, of the*value of £44,601, were received for 
recoinage at the mint at Sydney. 

The withdrawal of pre-Victorian gold coins, in the colony of Victoria, 
was £32,183. 

The total light-weight gold coin withdrawn in Australasia was 
£76,784. 

Through the kindness of Mr. George Anderson, deputy master of the 
Melbourne branch of the royal mint, I am able to present the statistics 
of the product of gold in Australia and New Zealand for the calendar 
year, 1890. 

Gross product: Ounces. 

Gold 1, 599, 350 

Making the usual deduction of about 8 per cent in order to obtain 
the amount of pure gold actually produced, the product of gold in 
Australasia during the calendar year 1890, was, approximately, 
1,471,402 ounces, value $30,413,879. 

India . — The silver coinage at the mints at Calcutta and Bombay dur : 
ing the calendar year 1890, amounted to 122,295,383 rupees. 

Canada . — According to the “monetary statistics of the United King- 
dom, 1890” the amount of gold and silver produced in Canada during 
the year 1889 was as follows: 



Metals. j 


! 


Ounces. 


Value in 
United States 
money. 


Gold 


259, 032 




$1,260,579 
495, 592 




383,318 


i 1 



FRANCE. 



Items reported tor 1890. 


Francs. 


Value in 
United States 
money. 


Coinage : 

Gold 


20, 602, 800 
11,999,580 


$3, 976, 340 
2, 315, 919 


Recoin age 


Silver (for French colonies) 


33, 345 
10, 250 


6, 436 
1, 978 


For the Great Comoro 


Total 




8, 414 








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125 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF, THE MINT. 

France — continued. 



Items reported for 1890. 


Francs. 


Value in 
United States 
Money. 


Imports : 

Gold 


116, 726,408 
249, 498, 004 


$22, 528, 197 
48, 153, 115 






132, 771, 596 


25, 624, 918 


Imports : 


137, 898, 631 
107, 890, 319 


26, 614, 436 
20, 822, 832 


Exports : 

Silver 


Gain by imports 


30,008,312 


5, 791, 604 


Product of mines, 1889 : >. 

Gold 


*400 
*80, 942 

1. 120. 126. 439 
1, 240, 874, 500 

3.051.751.440 


265, 840 
2, 363, 950 
216, 184. 403 
239, 488, 779 
588, 988, 028 


Silver 


Gold in Bank of France January 2, 1891 




Amount of currency issued by Bank of France, same dato 





* Kilograms. 



BELGIUM. 

There was no coinage of national money in Belgium during the year 
1890. 

The issue of bank notes by the National Bank amounted to 536,450,000 
francs on December 31, 1890. 



Imports : 

Gold 

Jewelry — 

Total 

Exports: 

Gold 

Jewelry ... 

Imports: 

Silver 

Silverware. 

Total 

Exports : 

Silver 

Silverware. 

Total.... 



Kilograms. 



Francs. 



ValueinUnited 
States money. 



13, 843 



2, 109, 145 



294 



60,631 



247, 042 



27,502 



1, 666, 637 



$9, 200, 058 
407,065 



9, 607, 123 



46, 870 



195, 392 
11,702 



-I- 



10, 267, 066 
321,661 

10, 588, 727 

1, 142, 983 
9, 046 

1, 152. 029 



Items reported for 1890. 



By royal decree a permanent commission has been appointed in Bel- 
gium for the investigation of monetary questions. 



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126 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT, 



SWITZERLAND. 



Items reported for 1890. 


Francs. 


Value in 
United States 
money. 


Gold coinage 


2,500,000 1 


$482,500 




1, 450, 000 


279,850 


Imports: 


Gold 


31,702,336 


6, 118, 551 


Silver 


44, 157, 460 


8, 552, 390 


Exports : 


Gold 


6,356,517 


1, 226, 808 


Silver 


19,916,040 


3, 843, 796 





The stock of gold in the Swiss banks of issue amounted on December 
27, 1890, to 61,414,835 francs, and of silver 23,475,820 francs. 

The notes in circulation at same date were 168,397,200 francs. 



ITALY. 



Items reported for 1890. 


Lire. 


Value in 
United States 
money. 




1, 364, 400 
5,655 
2,942,043 


$263, 329 
1,091 
567, 814 






Imports : 

Gold 


9, 913, 600 
19,778,300 


1,913, 325 
3, 817, 212 


Exports : 

Gold 


Loss by export 


[ 9,864,700 


1, 903, 887 


Imports : 


48, 090, 000 
48, 948, 760 


9,281,370 
9, 447, 111 


Exports : 

Silver 


Loss by ovpnrt _ _ 


SUM. 7fiO 


1 1fi!V 711 


Gold in Treasury and banks December 31, 1890 


1 ’1 7 


457, 167, 209 
105, 328, 608 
1, 469, 249, 677 


88, 233, 271 
20, 328, 421 
283, 565, 188 




Notes in circulation 




GREECE. 


Items reported for 1890. 


Drachmas. 


Value in 
United States 
money. 






$100,000 
700,000 
24, 404, 881 






Paper money 


126*450, 158 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT, 



127 



SPAIN. 



Items reported for 1890. 


Pesetas. 


Value in 
United States 
money. 


Gold: 

Coinage 

Recoinage 

Silver : 

Recoinage 

Imports : 

Gold (bars) 

Coin 







46, 888, 960 
2,423,397 

7, 664,000 

*7,654 
3, 252, 233 


$9, 049, 539 
467, 716 

1, 479, 152 

5, 086. 848 
627, 681 


Total 








5, 714, 529 


Imports : 

Silver (bars) 

Coin 






*68 

4, 687, 708 


2, 826 
904, 728 


Total 








907,554 


Exports : 

Silver 

Notes outstanding. . . 






t252 
730, 935, 000 


1,047 

141,070,455 


* Kilograms. 


PORTUGAL. 


t Hectograms 




Items reported for 1890. 


Milreis. 


Value in 
United States 
money. 


Gold coinage (all recoinage) 

Silver coinage (all recoinage) 


377.000 

500.000 


$407, 160 
540, 000 



GERMANY. 



Items reported for 1890. 


Kilograms. 


Marks. 


Value in 
United States 
money. 


Gold: 








Coinage 




100, 149, 210 


$23,835,512 


Rocoinage (imperial gold) 




404, 230 


96, 207 


Coin (foreign) 6,306 fine pounds . - 






2, 095, 484 


Imports 


39,865 




26, 494, 279 


Exports 


16,290 




10, 826, 334 


Gain by imports 


23,575 




15, 667, 945 


Silver: 








Imports 


66,003 




2, 743, 085 


Exports 


282, 400 




11, 736,544 


Pagament : 








Imports 




13,621,000 


3, 241, 798 


Exports *. 




16,000 


3,808 


Product of German smelting works: 








Gold 




5, 151, 000 


1, 225, 938 


Silver 




56,060,000 


13, 342, 280 


Notes outstanding December 31, 1890: 








Imperial notes 




122, 908, 940 


29, 252, 328 


Banknotes 




1, 294, 817, 000 


308,166,446 



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128 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



AUSTRIA-HUNGARY. 



Items reported /or 1890. 



Coinage: 

Gold • 

Kecoinage 

Silver coinage 

Beeoinage 

Gold: 

Imports 

Exports 

Net gain 

Silver : 

Imports 

Exports 

Net gain 

Gold in Government vaults 

In Austria-Hungarian Bank 

Silver in Government vaults 

Silver in Austria-Hungarian Bank 
Bank notes outstanding : 

State notes 

Bank notes 

Gold product of mines, Austria. . . 

Hungary 

Silver product of mines : 

Austria 

Hungary 



Kilograms. 



42, 820 
17, 333 



25, 487 



41,828 

11,690 



Florins. 



5, 848, 030 
1,913, 729 
8, 002, 320 
1,926,667 



30, 138 



12. 452 
2, 091.062 

34, 629. 797 
15, 983. 543 



8, 210, 316 
54, 047, 000 
9, 092, 367 
165, 476, 000 

370, 361, 103 
445, 934, 210 



Value in 
United States 
money. 



$2, 818, 750 
922, 417 
3, 857, 118 
928, 653 



28, 458, 172 
11, 519, 512 

16, 938, 660 



1, 738, 371 
485, 836 

1, 252, 535 

~ 3, 957, 372 
26, 050, 654 
4, 382, 521 
. 79, 759, 432 

178, 514, 052 
214, 940, 289 
8, 276 
1, 389, 720 

1,439, 214 
664, 276 



NETHERLANDS. 



Items reported for 1890. 

t 


Florins. 


Value in 
United States 
money. 


Coinage: 


495, 000 
210, 000 


$198, 990 
84, 420 




Imports : 


6, 527, 245 
567, 557 


2, 623, £ >3 
228, 158 


Exports: 

Gold 


Gain by import 


5, 959. 688 


2, 395, 795 


Silver : ■ 


1, 372, 695 
7, 671, 500 


551,823 
3, 083, 943 


Imports 


Exports 


Loss by export 


6, 298, 805 


2, 532, 120 





Gold stock, 47,594,460 florins, of which 23,291,720 florins were in the 
Bank of the Netherlands. 

Silver stock, 116,713,423 florins, of which 7,616,174 were in subsidiary 
coin. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 129 

Total metallic stock, 164,307,883 florins, of which 65,498,690 florins 
were in the Bank of the Netherlands. 

Note circulation, 15,000,000 florins in Governmenfrnotes and 195,160,615 
in bank notes, a total of 210,160,615 florins. 

SCANDINAVIAN UNION. 



Items reported for 1890. 



DENMARK. 



Kilograms. 



Crowns. 



Value in 
United States 
money. 



Gold: 

Coinage 

Imports 

Exports 

Net gain by imports. 

Estimated stock of gold. . . 
Estimated stock of silver. 
Bank notes in circulation . 



2, 044, 520 

Tmmoo 

2,500,000 
1, 000, 000 
47, 000, 000 



$547 ,931 

938.000 

670.000 

268.000 

12, 596, 000 



20, 000, 000 



5, 360, 000 



79, 000, 000 



21,172,000 



NORWAY. 



Silver coinage 

Recoinage 

Gold and silver : 

Imports - 

Exports 

Silver product 5, 

Precious metals in Bank of Norway, December 31, 1890 : 



538.9 



Gold 



Estimated stock of gold . 
Estimated stock of silver . 
Bank notes in circulation 



450,000 
76, 000 

357, 400 
52,500 



30, 160, 700 
15, 860, 670 
6, 032, 000 
49, 670, 700 



Coinage : 
Gold. 



SWEDEN. 



Silver 

Recoinage silver 

Gold imports : 

Coin 

Bars 

Gold exports 

Silver imports : 

Coin 

Bars 

Silver exports— bars 

Silver exports ; coin 

Product of mines : 

Gold 

Silver 

Gold in banks and mint. . . 
Silver coins in circulation 
Notes outstanding 



102 

1 



2, 429 
652 



87.66 
4, 181 



3, 109, 820 
947, 264 
405, 110 

9,060 



633, 662 



128, 000 



24,951,727 
17,521,398 
103, 995, 415 



120, 600 
20,368 



95, 783 
14, 070 
230, 197 



8,083,068 
4, 250, 660 
1, 616, 576 
13,311,748 



833, 432 
253,867 
108, 569 

2,428 
67, 789 
665 

169, 821 
100, 949 
27, 097 
34, 304 



58, 259 
173, 762 
6, 687, 063 
4, 695, 735 
27, 870, 771 



10285 m 9 



Digitized by tjOOQle 



130 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



RUSSIA. 



Items reported for 1890. 


Kilograms. 


Poods. 


Roubles. 


Value in 
United States 
money. 


Coinage : 

Gold 







28, 150, 090 
2, 091, 763 


$21, 726,239 
1, 614, 422 




i : 






1 


Total 




1 




23, 340, 661 










Silver (reeoiiiage) 




1 


562,000 


433, 752 


Gold : 




1,243 

1,337 




13,531,895 
14, 555, 224 


















94 




1,023. 329 








Silver : 

Imports . . - 

Exports 


i 

t 


10, 637 
6,070 




' 7,241,389 

4, 132, 296 


Gain bv import 




4, 567 




1 3,109,093 


Product of mines : 

Gold 


31,841.257 
13. 665. 836 




i 


21,161,700 

568,000 


Silver 




i 






i 


Total 


1 






21,729, 700 









Gold and silver held by State Hank Jan. 1, 
1891 




443,968, 176 


! 

, 344, 198, 238 

807, 530, 777 


Government notes out stand ing 






1, 046, 295, 384 










ROUMANIA. 




' 



Roumania adopted the gold standard in March, 1800, the law requir- 
ing the replacement of 40,000,000 francs of the 5 lei silver currency with 
gold coin. 

About 25,000,000 francs in silver have been withdrawn from circula- 
tion and sold. 

The holders of silver 5 lei pieces have the right to demand gold in ex- 
change for a period of a year from the date of the law, after which 
period silver coins are a limited tender, 

TURKEY. 

A gold coinage of the value of 10, 2(H) Turkish pounds was struck at 
the imperial mint during the year 1890. (Value in United States 



money $44,880.) 

ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 


Items reported for 1890. 


Value. 




$6,925,384 

163,017 

775,529 

81, 939 
610, 142 
13,229, 468 
200, 000 
254, 171,645 






Products of mines : 

Gold 


Silver 


Estimate stock of gold 1 

Estimate stock of silver 

Bank notes in circulation — - J 



Digitized by V joogle 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



131 



PERU. 



Items reported for 1890. 


Kilograms. 


Value. 


Coinage (1889) : 

Silver 




$2,842,530 
92, 379 


Exports : 

Gold 


139 




88 


3,657 
1, 299, 782 


Silver sols 


Total 






1, 303, 439 


Coinage (1890) : 

Silver 






2, 687, 118 

68, 454 
47, 171 


Exports : 

Gold bars 


103 
1, 135 


Silver bars 





VENEZUELA, 


Items reported for 1890. | 


Value. 


Gold product (11 months) 


$1,060, 977 
725,680 


Bank notes outstanding 3,760,000 bolivars 





BOLIVIA. 

The United States minister reports that there is no gold in circulation 
in Bolivia, but there are about $200,000 in silver in bank. 

The amount of Government and bank notes outstanding December 31, 
1889, was $4,393,184. 

MEXICO, 



Items reported for 1890. 



Value. 



Exports : 

Gold bullion 

Silver ore and bullion 
Deposits at the mints : 



$529, 515 
15, 656, 111 



Gold 

Silver 

Coinage calendar year : 

Gold 

Silver 



237,053 
25, 258, 785 

284, 859 
24,081, 192 



COLOMBIA. 





Items reported for 1890. 


Kilograms. 


Value. 




$12, 000, 000 
4, 250, 000 
4, 393, 872 
82, 871 
1,457,665 




Gold exports 

Silver imports 

Silver exports 




1,994 

1 

i 


Digitized by CjOO^L 



132 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



A very valuable table will be found in the Appendix, prepared by Dr. 
Yieente Restrepo, upon the production of gold and silver in Colombia 
from 1887 to 1890 inclusive. 

This eminent statistician places the product of 1889 at $4,042,000, of 
which $612,000 were silver; in 1890, at $4,430,000, of which $735,000 
were silver. 

NICARAGUA. 



Items reported for 1890. 


Ounces. 


Value in 
United States 
money. 




10,990 


$227, 163 
307,373 
273, 424 
164, 861 

99,049 

570,000 

669,049 








Gold product 




Paper circulation : 

Treasury notes 




Bank notes 




Total 







HAYTI. 



Items reported for 1890. 


Value. 


nf cold ....... 


$2, 300 r 000 
2, 800, 000 
4, 102, 873 


Stock of Silver - 


Paper circulation 





HAWAIIAN ISLANDS. 



Items reported for 1890. 


Valuo'. 


Import of gold 


$776, 000 

3. 000. 000 

1. 000. 000 


Stock of gold - 


Stock of silver 



Government notes 137, 000 



JAPAN. 



Coinage: 



Items reported for 1890. 



Ounces or 
kilograms. 



Yen. 



Gold 

Silver 

Silver recoinage 



870 



Imports of gold : 

Bullion | 15,811 

Foreign coin 

Total | 

Exports 1 



1, 194, 050 
7, 296, 645 






1, 682, 608 | 



Value in 
United States 
money. 



$1, 194, 050 
7,296,645 
1,125 



326, 813^ 
623 

327, 436 
1, 682, 608 



Digitized by boogie 





6 

t 



L*> 

9 



3 tr " a , 

G U_ — 

_)<nyo2s / f 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 133 



japan — continued. q / i . 1 

, / 3 *7 L l 1 * 2 ' 


Items reported for 1890. 


Ounces or 
kilograms. 


Ten. 


Value in 
United States 
money. 


Silver imports : 


308, 018 




$398, 245 
383,079 


Foreign coin 


383,079 


Total 




| 1 1 


781, 324 


Exports : » 


1 




12, 079,812 


12, 079, 812 
11,394 




8,813 


Total . 






1 


12, 091,206 


Product of mines : 

Government mines (gold) 






* 26. 766 
* 708, 594 

! 




17, 782 
29,449 
88,468, 182 
60,205,516 

33, 272,714 
26,810,720 
75,709, 157 


Government mines (silver) 




Stock of gold 


88, 468,182 
60,205, 516 

33, 272,714 
25, 810,720 
75,709,157 


Stock of silver 




Government and bank notes outstanding : 

Government 


i 


National bank 




Bank of Japan (convertible silver notes) 





* Kilograms. 



CHINA. 

It is reported that silver coins, consisting of dollars of the fineness 
of .900, and half-dollars, and 20, 10, and 5 cent silver pieces of a lower 
grade of fineness were struck at the mint at Canton during the year 
1890. 

According to the assays of the coins, published in the report of the 
Deputy Master of the Royal Mint, London, the degrees of fineness were : 
for the dollar, 884.2; half-dollar, 848.2; and of the smaller denominations 
807.3, 808, and 811.1, respectively, showing that the coins differ very 
largely in fineness from standard, and the weights of the coins are said 
to be fairly correct. 

WORK OF THE BUREAU OF THE MINT. 



The work of the Bureau of the Mint during the last fiscal year was 
well and faithfully performed. 

Owing very largely to the importance which coinage and currency 
questions have assumed in national legislation, the work of the Bureau 
has been unusually heavy, requiring, in addition to the regular work ? 
the compilation of a vast amount of statistical matter. 

All of this work has been cheerfully met and promptly performed by 
the small clerical force at my disposal without any increase of force. 

I am, very respectfully, yours, 

Edward O. Leech, 

JHreetor of the Mint. 



Hon. Charles Foster, 

Secretary of the Treasury. 



Digitized by 



Google 




Digitized by Google 




APPENDIX. 



CONTENTS.' 

Page. 

I. — Deposits and purchases of gold and silver, expressed in standard 

ounces 136 

II. — Deposits and purchases of gold and silver, expressed in coining 

value 138 

III. — Deposits of gold of domestic production, expressed in standard 

ounces 140 

IV. — Deposits of gold of domestic production, expressed in coining 

value 142 

V. — Deposits of silver of domestic production, expressed in standard 

ounces 144 

VI. — Deposits of silver of domestic production, expressed in coining 

value . 146 

VII. — Bars manufactured, expressed in standard ounces 148 

VIII. — Bars manufactured, expressed in coining value 148 

IX. — Coinage, fiscal year 1891 150 

X. — Coinage, calendar year 1890 150 

XI. — Earnings and expenditures 152 

XII. — Seigniorage on silver 154 

XIII. — Assets and liabilities, June 30, 1891 156 

XIV. — Medals manufactured 158 

XV. — Coinage and medal dies manufactured T59 

XVI. — Expenditures for distribution of silver coin 160 

XVII. — Expenditures for distribution of minor coin 160 

XVIII. — Wastage and loss on sale of sweeps 161 

XIX. — Monthly purchases of silver bullion, act February 28, 1878 161 

XX. — Monthly purchases of silver bullion, act July 14, 1890 162 

XXI. — Monthly purchases of silver bullion, acts February 28, 1878, and 

July 14, 1890 163 

XXII. — Quantity and cost of silver used in the coinage of silver dollars, 

wasted and sold in sweeps, act February 28, 1878 164 

XXIII. — Quantity and cost of silver used in the coinage of silver dollars, 

wasted and sold in sweeps, act July 14, 1890 166 

XXIV. — Quantity and cost of silver used in the coinage of silver dollars, 
wasted and sold in sweeps under acts February 28, 1878, and 

July 14, 1890 170 

XXV.— Tables of assays 172 

XX VI.— Imports and exports of gold and silver 174 

XXVII. — Imports and exports of gold and silver ores. 180 

XXVIII. — Imports, by countries, of gold and silver into United States 182 

XXIX. — Exports, by countries, of domestic gold and silver 184 

XXX. — Exports, by countries, of foreign gold and silver 184 

XXXI. — Comparison of business of mints and assay offices, 1890 and 1891 . . 186 

XXXII. — Deposits of gold and silver of domestic production from organiza- 
tion of mint 188 

XXXIII. — Highest, lowest, and average price of silver each year since 1833. . 189 

XXXIV. — Ratio of silver to gold each year since 1687 190 

XXXV. — Production of gold and silver in United States from 1792 to 1890. . 191 

XXXVI. — Coinage of nations, 1888, 1889, and 1890 |92 

XXXVII. — World’s production of gold and silver, 1888, 4889, and 1890. ...... 194 

XXXVIII. — Coinage of the mints of the United States by calendar years from 

organization of mint, 196 

XXXIX. — Monetary statistics of foreign countries 220 

Digitized by 



136 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



I* — Deposits and Purchases of Gold and Silver by 



Description. 



GOLD. 

Domestic bullion 

Domestic coin 

Foreign bullion 

Foreign coin 

Jewelers’ bars, old plate, etc . 



Total 

Redeposits : 

Fine bars 

Unparted bars . 



Total gold received. 



SILVER. 

Domestic bullion 

Domestic coin 

Trade dollars 

Foreign bullion 

Foreign coin 

Jewelers’ bars, old plate, etc. 



Total 

Redeposits : 

Fine bars 

Unparted bars . 



Total silver received . 



COINAGE MINTS. 



Redeposits : 
Gold ... 
Silver . . 



Total gold and silver received. . . 



Philadelphia. 


San Francisco. 


Carson. 


New Orleans. 


Standard oz$. 
3,273. 833 
7,714. 371 
1,811.965 
38. 446 


Standard ozi. 
821, 910.976 
364.228 


Standard oz. 
87, 051. 186 


Standard oze. 
269.672 
1, 299.885 
2,926.656 
330. 389 


127, 075. 577 
208,881.346 
1, 165. 852 






50, 431. 986 




2, 106.465 




63, 270. 601 


1, 159, 397. 979 


87,051.186 


6,933.067 


845, 954. 282 








i 


409, 224. 883 


1, 159, 397. 979 


87, 051. 186 


6, 933. 067 


40, 023, 553. 13 
533, 049. 88 
809. 97 


7, 020, 836. 59 
170,787.00 
105.27 


1,949, 542.75 
10.30 


4, 028, 799. 41 
743. 11 
22.60 


121,268. 72 
2, 119. 85 


969, 803. 35 
11, 682. 40 
2, 104. 99 




136, 675. 16 
57,322.57 
12,249.71 




286, 320. 07 






40, 967, 121. 62 


8, 175, 319. 60 


1, 949, 553. 05 


4,235,812.56 


203, 044. 45 
2, 089, 460. 31 


581, 170. 00 


140, 401. 61 


3, 446, 231. 55 
3, 482,578.00 






43, 259, 626. 38 


8, 756, 489. 60 


2, 089, 954. 66 


11, 164, 622. 11 


41, 030, 392. 221 

345, 954. 282 
2, 292, 504. 76 


9, 334, 717. 579 


2.036,604.236 


4, 242, 745. 627 


581, 170. 00 


140,401.61 


6, 928, 809. 55 


43, 668, 851, 263 


9, 915, 887. 579 


2,177,005.846 


11, 171, 555. 177 



Digitized by 



Google 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT, 



137 



Weight, during the Fisc at, Year ended June 30, 1891. 



ASSAY OFFICES. 


New York. 


Denver. 


Bois6. 


Helena. 


Charlotte. 


St. Louis. 


Total. 


Standard ozs. 
607, 266. 275 
20, 170. 264 
84,066.924 
234, 509. 197 
169,017. 030 


Standard ozs. 
61, 206. 490 
813. Ill 


Standard ozs. 
31, 809. 371 


Standard ozs. 
50, 322. 174 
4.569 


Standard ozs. 
12, 509. 613 


Standard ozs. 
20,467.943 
1,015. 357 


Standard ozs. 
1,696,087.533 
31, 381. 785 
217,946. 729 
443, 776. 330 
216, 919.420 


1,059.733 






105, 874 




16. 952 




401. 071 




308. 835 


14. 760 


3, 473.421 




1,105,929.690 

247,307. 540 
244.434 


63,480.405 


31. 809. 371 


50, 652. 530 


12, 524. 373 


25, 062, 595 


2, 606, 111. 797 

247, 307. 540 
351,460. 863 


143.919 


4,672.218 


344. 725 


10,437 


90. 818 


1, 353,484.664 


63, 624. 324 


36, 481. 589 


50, 997. 255 


12, 534. 810 


25, 153. 443 


3, 204, 880. 200 


3,217, 311.66 
663. 53 




16,083. 85 


15,471. 77 


16, 820. 67 


907. 65 


7, 467. 71 


56, 296, 795. 19 
705, 253. 82 
3, 248. 47 
1, 964, 342. 47 
2, 189, 902. 34 
703, 414. 02 


2, 310. 63 
735,952.70 
2,118,761.21 
399,096.21 




i 






624. 98 






17.56 




16. 31 




315.42 




168.69 


11. 02 


3, 147. 91 






6,474,095.94 

36,750.14 

25,015.82 


17,024.25 


15, 471.77 


17, 005. 67 


918.67 


10,633.18 j 


61, 862, 956. 31 

4. 407, 597. 75 
5, 599, 109. 86 


82.94 


1, 603. 01 


284. 94 

... 


1.40 


i 

83.44 


6,535, 861.90 


17, 107. 19 


17, 074. 78 


17, 290. 61 


920.07 


10, 716. 62 


71, 869, 663. 92 




7,580,025.630 


80,504.655 


47, 281. 141 


67, 658. 200 


13,443.043 


35, 695. 775 


64, 469, 068. 107 


247,551.974 

61,765.96 


143.919 

82.94 


4,672. 218 
1, 603. 01 


344. 725 
284. 94 


10,437 

1.40 


90. 848 
83. 44 


598, 768. 403 
10, 006,707. 61 


7, 889, 343. 564 


80,731.514 


53, 556. 369 


68, 287. 865 


13, 454. 880 


35, 870. 063 


75, 074, 544. 120 



Digitized by Google 




138 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



II.— Deposits and Purchases of Golp and Silver, eV 







COINAGE 


MINTS. 


- 




Philadelphia. 


San Francisco: 


Carson. 


New Orleans. 


GOLD. 

Domestic bullion 


$60, 908. 52 


$15, £91, 366. 99 


$1,619, 556.94 


$5, 017. 15 


Domestic coin 


143, 523. 18 


6, 776. 33 




24, 183. 91 


Foreign bullion 


33, 710. 98 


2, 364, 196. 78 




54, 449. 41 


Foreign coin 


715. 27 


3, 886, 164. 58 




6, 146. 77 


Jewelers’ bars, old plate, etc 


938, 269. 51 


21, 690. 27 




39, 190. 05 


Total 


1, 177, 127. 46 


21, 570, 194. 96 


1, 619, 556. 94 


128, 987. 29 


Redeposits : 

Fine bars * * 


' 




.... 




TTnparted bars * 


6, 436, 358. 73 









Total gold received 


7, 613, 486. 19 


21, 570, 194. 95 


1, 619, 556. 94 


128, 987. 20 


SILVER. 










Domestic bullion 


46, 572, 861. 82 


8, 169, 700. 76 


2, 268, 558. 83 


4, 688, 057. 50 


Domestic coin 


620, 276. 22 


108.733.96 


11.98 | 


864.71 


Trade dollars 


942. 5l 


122.50 




26. 30 


Foreign bullion 


141,112.60 


1, 128, 498. 44 





159,040. 10 


Foreign coin * ... * 


2, 466. 74 


13,594.07 


- 


66, 702. 62 


Jewelers’ bars, old plate, etc 


333, 172. 45 


2,449.44 





14,254.20 


Total 


47, 670. 832. 43 


9, 513, 099. 17 


i 2,268,570.81 


| 4,028,945.52 


Redeposits : 

Fine bars 


t 

236, 269. 90 


676, 270. 54 


163, 376. 42 


1 

| 

4, 010, 160. 35 


Unparted bars 


2, 431, 372. 00 


• 1 




4, 052, 454. 40 


Total silver received 


50, 338, 474. 33 


10,189,369.71 


2,431,947.23 


12, 991, 560. 27 


Gold and silver deposits and purchases . 


48, 847, 959. 89 


31, 083, 294. 12 


3,888, 127.75 


5,057,932.81 


Redeposits : 

Gold 


6, 436, 358. 73 








Silver 


2,667, 641.90 


676, 270. 54 


163.376. 42 


8, 062, 614. 75 


Total gold and silver received. . . ^ 


57, 951, 960. 52 


31,759,564.66 


4, 051, 504. 17 


13, 120, 547. 56 





tlKPORT OF THU DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 139 

VaLuk, during the Fiscal Year ended June 30 , 1891 . 



ASSAY OFFICES. 



New York; 


Denver; 


Bois4 City; 


Helena. 


. Charlotte. 


St. Louie; 


Total. 


$11,297,977.21 
375, 260. 72 
1, 580, 779. 98 
4,362,961.80 
2,958, 466.37 


$1,138,725.39 
15, 127. 65 
19,715.96 



7,461.79 


$591, 802. 25 




$936, 226. 49 
85. 01 

315.38 
5, 745. 77 


$232, 736. 98 
274.60 


$380, 798. 93 
18, 890. 36 
1,969. 75 

64, 621. 79 


$31, 555, 116. 85 
583, 847. 16 
4, 054,822. 86 
8, 256, 303. 80 
4,035,710. 15 


20, 575, 436. 08 


1, 181,030.79 


591, 802. 25 


942. 372. 65 


233,011.58 


466, 280. 83 


48,485, 800. 82 


4, 601, 070. 52 












4, 601,070. 52 


4, 547. 61 


2,677.56 


86, 924. 98 


6, 413. 49 


194. 18 


1, 690. 19 


6, 538, 806. 74 


25, 181, 054. 21 


1, 183,708. 35 


678, 727. 23 


948, 786. 14 


233, 205. 76 


467,971.02 


59, 625, 678. 08 


3,743,780.84 


18, 715.75 


18, 003. 51 


19, 573. 14 


1.056.18 


8. 689. 70 


65, 508, 998. 03 


772. 11 













820, 658. 98 


2, 688.73 








i 

I 


i ■ 


3, 780. 04 


856,381.32 
2,465,467.59 ! 


727.25 




: 

18.97 


I 


20. 43 


^ 2, 285, 780. 32 
2, 548, 249. 99 


461,402.86 ^ 


367.03 




196.29 


12.82 


3,663.02 


818, 518.11 


7, 533,493. 45 


19, 810.03 


18,003.51 ! 


! 19, 788. 40 


1,009.00 


12,373.15 


! 71,985,985.47 


42, 763. 80 












* 5,128,841.01 


29,109.32 


96. 51 


1,865.32 


331. 56 


1.&3 


97.09 


6, 515, 327. 83 


7,605,366.57 


19,906.54 

i 


19,868.83 1 


1 20, 119. 96 


| 1,070.63 


12,470.24 


83, 630, 154. 31 


28,108,929.53 


1,200,840.82 


609,805.76 


962, 161. 05 


234, 080. 58 


478,653.98 


120,471,786.29 


4,605,618.13 


2, 677. 56 


86, 924. 98 


6, 413.49 


194. 18 


1,690.19 


11, 139, 877. 26 


71,873.12 


96.51 


1, 865. 32 


331.56 


j 1.63 


97.09 


11, 644, 168. 84 


32,786,420. 78 


| 1,203,614.89 


698, 596. 06 


968, 906. 10 


I 

234,276.39 


480, 441. 26 


143,255,832.39 



Digitized by Google 





140 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



III. — Deposits of Unrefined Gold of Domestic Production, with the States 

Distributed, by Weight, during the 



Locality. 


COINAGE MINTS. 


Philadelphia. 


San Francisco. 


Carson. 


New Orleans. 


Alabama 


Standard ozs. 


Standard ozs. 


Standard ozs. 


Standard ozs. 
37. 261 






3, 207. 732 
12, 601. 097 
165, 488. 135 
8.227 






126. 800 


I 




39. 720 


942. 150 






254. 326 






37. 153 




232. 411 


Idaho 


83. 106 


5, 277. 566 


2. 321 




75. 295 












Montana 


9. 392 


746. 725 






Nevada 


11,401. 722 


85, 859. 322 




New Mevieo 


485. 574 
193. 642 


803. 615 




North Carolina 






Oregon 




9, 631. 594 






South Carolina 








South Dakota 










Tennessee 


5. 147 








Utah 


3, 224. 305 


247. 393 




Virginia 




79. 653 




Washington 


887. 158 






Wvomine 


23.208 


14. 707 






Other sources ......... 


1, 860. 817 


23. 843 












Total unrefined 


3, 273. 833 


213, 316. 426 
608, 594. 550 


87, 051. 186 


269. 672 


Refined 










Total gold 


3, 273. 833 


821,910.976 


87, 051. 186 


269.672 





Digitized by Google 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT, 



141 



and Territories Producing the same, and of Refined Domestic Bullion not 
Fiscal Year ended June 30 , 1891 . 



ASSAY OFFICES. 


Total. 


New York. 


Denver. 


Bois6. 


Helena. 


Charlotte. 


St. Louis. 


Standard ozs. 
17. 639 


Standard ozs. 


Standard ozs. 


Standard ozs) 


Standard ozs. 


Standard ozs. 


Standard ozs . 

54.900 

3,207. 732 
14,993. 438 
167,140.040 
105,479. 819 
3,678.121 
41,864.291 
552. 968 
3,022. 860 
66, 768. 743 
97,901.785 
24,063. 919 
2,741.559 
17, 339. 671 
6, 644. 908 
162, 896. 680 
11.934 
5, 001. 768 
139. 958 
3,096. 035 
830. 084 
36, 392. 068 






1 




2, 087. 179 
614.772 
45,162.122 


178.362 

6.575 

50,147.199 




1 






l 


48.688 
9,901.246 
6. 238 
52. 273 




6.699 






3, 402. 319 


2,540.002 
442.397 
2,924.133 
26, 617. 276 
640. 741 
3,442.822 
l 142. 925 


309.778 


24, 836. 305 


8, 762. 940 


35. 276 








98.727 


58. 529 




39, 336. 821 










9, 013. 625 








10, 318. 283 






2, 404. 992 


59. 893 


675. 118 


6, 973. 066 


i 


i 




6, 644. 908 




' 162, 889. 843 
' 6. 787 






6. 837 








! 


| 3,488.330 

| 38. 187 


1 

25. 135 




16.605 




22.118 


i 




2, 208. 877 




j 


792. 169 








34, 481. 525 






25. 883 








283, 596. 573 
323, 669. 702 


61, 206.490 


31,809.371 1 50,322.174 

l 


12, 509. 613 


20,467.943 


763,823.281 
932, 264. 252 












607, 266. 275 


61,206.490 


31, 809. 371 


50, 322. 174 


12, 509. 613 | 20,467.943 


1, 696, 087.533 



Digitized by Google 





142 REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OE THE MINT. 

JV # — Deposits of Unrefined Gold of Domestic Production, with the States 

Distributed, by Value, during the 



Locality. 


COINAGE MINTS. 


Philadelphia. 


San Francisco. 


Carson. J New Orleans. 











$693.23 






$59, 678. 73 
234, 439. 01 
3, 078, 849. 02 
153. 06 






$2, 359. 07 
738, 98 
4, 731.65 
691.22 
1, 546. 16 
1, 400. 84 








$17, 528. 37 












4, 323. 92 




98, 187. 27 


43. 18 
















174. 73 


13. 892. 56 
212, 125. 06 
14, 950. 98 


1 




. 

1,597,382.73 




New Mexico 


9, 033. 93 
3, 602. 64 




Horth Carolina 






Oregon 


179, 192. 45 




1 


South Carolina 








South Dakota . 










Tennessee 


95. 76 








Utah 


59, 987. 07 


4, 602. 66 




Virginia 


1, 481. 02 


* 


Washington 


16, 505. 27 
273. 62 
443. 59 







Wyoming 


431. 77 
34, 619. 85 






Other sources 






Total unrefined 

Refined gold 






60, 908. 52 


3, 968, 677. 69 
11, 322, 689. 30 


1, 619, 556. 94 


5,017.15 


Total gold 








60, 908. 52 


15, 291, 366. 99 


1, 619, 556. 94 


5,017.15 



Digitized by CaOOQle 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 148 

and Territories Producing the same, and of Refined Domestic Bullion not 
Fiscal Year Ended June 30 , 1891 . 



ASSAY OFFICES. | 

1 


New York. 


Denver. 


Bois6. 


Helena. 


Charlotte. 


St. Louis. 


$328. 16 










• 












38, 831.24 
11, 437. 62 
840, 225. 53 


$3, 318. 36 
122.32 
















$905.82 
184, 209. 23 
116. 05 


932, 971. 15 




$124.63 






$63, 298. 96 


47, 255. 85 
8, 230. 64 
54. 402. 47 
495, 205. 13 
11, 920. 76 


5, 763. 31 


$462, 070. 79 


163, 031. 44 


972.52 


656.30 








1, 836. 78 


1,088.91 




731, 847. 83 










167, 695. 35 








191,968.06 


| 64, 052. 50 

j 2, 659. 07 






44, 744. 03 


| 1,114.29 


12, 560. 33 


.. . . 
129, 731. 46 








1 123, 626. 19 




3, 030. 508. 71 






127. 20 


1 


I 126.27 








1 27. 689. 86 


467. 63 


t 

I 


I • 


308. 93 


j 710. 46 






411.50 


1 

i 


41, 095. 39 




| 


14.738.03 1 






| 641.516.74 






1 • 


- 481.54 


i 






5.276.215.30 
; 6.021,761.91 


1, 138, 725. 39 


591, 802. 25 


936, 226. 49 


232, 736. 98 




380. 798. 93 


! 




! 


11. 297, 977. 21 


1.138, 725.39 


591. 802. 25 


936,226.49 j 232,736.98 


380. 798. 93 



Total. 



$1,021.39 

59. 678. 73 
278, 947. 68 

3, 109, 582. 13 
1, 962, 415. 25 

68. 430. 15 
778, 870. 52 

10, 287. 78 

56, 239. 25 
1, 242, 209. 16 
1, 821, 428. 55 
447, 700. 82 

51. 005. 74 
322, 598. 53 
123, 626. 19 

3, 030, 685. 91 
222. 03 

93. 056. 15 
2, 603. 88 

57, 600. 66 

15, 443.42 
677, 06L 72 

14, 210, 665. 64 

17, 344, 451. 21 

31,555, 116.85 



Digitized by C.ooqLc 




144 REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

V«— Deposits of Unrefined Silver of Domestic Production, with the States 

Distributed, by Weight, during the 



Locality. 


COINAGE MINT8. 


Philadelphia. 


San Francisco. 


Carson. 


New Orleans. 




Standard oz$. 


Standard ozt. 


Standard ozs. 


Standard ozs. 


Alaska 




645.90 
7, 720. 12 
24,319.86 
1.72 








36.93 
7.20 
178.04 
2.50 
23.86 
3. 87 
11,553.63 
1.67 








1,038.85 






. ' 




j 1 


Idaho 


1, 301. 71 


75. 95 




Maryland 




Michigan 






Montana 


61.54 
193, 843. 90 
4,380.72 






Nevada 


1, 948, 392. 89 




New Mexico 


81.20 

29.08 


f 


North Carolina 


' ! 


Oregon 


1, 486. 18 


! | 


South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 


i 

1 

! 


i ; 

I 1 

1 ! 



Utah 




170, 013. 32 


35.00 


1 


Virginia 


3. 29 


i 


Washington 




123. 04 
1. 20 






Wyoming 


1.72 
282. 31 






Other States 


0, 829. 85 












Total unrefined 


12, 206. 23 


411,389.78 


1, 949,542.75 




Refined 


40, 011, 346. 90 


6,609,446.81 


4,028,799.41 






Total silver 


40,023,553.13 


7,020,836.59 1 

1 


1,949,542.75 


4,028,799.41 



Digitized by v^.ooQle 




REPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 145 



and Territories Producing the same, and of Refined Domestic Bullion not 
Fiscal Year ended June 30 , 1891 . 



ASSAT OFFICES. 


Total. 


New York. 


Denver. 


Bois6. 


Helena. 


Charlotte. 


St. Lonis. 


Standard ozs. 
4.76 


Standard ozs. 


Standard ozs. 


Standard ozs. 


Standard ozs. 


Standard ozs. 


i Standard ozs. 

4.76 

645.90 

19.426.31 
25, 525. 21 
24, 350t 98 

189.03 
45, 97L 13 
16.23 
43,720.71 
738,523.56 
2,142,417.28 
104,225.80 
. 369. 91 
3, 185.93 
399.09 

35. 215. 32 
.53 

296,982.35 
13. 76 
575. 81 
143.72 
69, 901. 80 












11, 604. 64 
148. 46 
5,903.27 


64.62 
1.12 
14,429. 40 
















9.72 
3, 836. 84 




1. 71 






186. 53 


28, 894. 09 
11.28 
32, 155.89 
723,735.94 
180.43 
94,910.61 
22.39 
8.23 


30.10 


13,920. 07 


1, 653. 36 


11.99 


1.08 








11.19 


10.98 




14, 713. 43 










1,263.38 








3, 589. 89 






317.84 


139.82 


1, 551. 70 








399.09 




35,215.32 

.20 

126,329. 17 
7.36 




















3.69 








1. 11 






3. 11 






452. 17 






140. 74 








62,782.67 








6.97 






i ' 




1, 121,914.71 
2,095,396.95 


16,083.85 


15,471.77 


16, 820. 67 


907.65 


7,467. 71 


3,551, 805.12 
52,744,990.07 












3,217,311.66 


16,083.85 


15,471.77 


16, 820. 67 


907. 65 


7,467. 71 


56,296,795.19 



10286 m 10 



Digitized by Google 








146 EEPOET OP THE DIRECTOR OP THE MINT. 

VI,— Deposits of Unrefined Silver of Domestic Production, with the States 

Distributed, by Value, during the 



Locality. 


COINAGE MINTS. 


Philadelphia. 


San Francisco. 


Carson. 


New Orleans. 
















$751.59 
8,983.41 
28, 299.47 
2.00 








$42.97 
8.88 
207.17 
2. 91 
27.77 
4.50 
13, 444. 22 
1.94 








$1,208.84 
















1, 584. 54 


88.37 
















Montana 


71.61 
225, 563. 88 
5, 097. 57 








2, 267, 220. 83 




New Mexico. - 


94.49 
34. 54 




North Carolina 




i 


Oregon 


1,729.37 




1 


South Carolina 






1 


South Dakota 










Tennessee 


.38 








Utah 


198,531.87 


40.79 




Virginia 


3.83 




Washington 


143.87 

1.47 

7,947.46 






2.00 

328.51 


! 

1 


Other sources 


1 


Total unrefined 

Refined 




14,203.61 
46, 558, 658. 21 


478,708.11 

7,690,992.65 


2,268,558.83 


$4, 688, 057. 50 


Total silver 




46,572,861.82 


8, 169, 700. 76 


2, 268, 558. 83 | 4,688,057.50 



Digitized by Google 








REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



147 



AND TERRITORY PRODUCING THE SAME, AND OF REFINED DOMESTIC BULLION NOT 
Fiscal Year ended June 30 , 1891 . 



ASSAY OFFICES. 


Total. 


New York. 


Denver. 


Bois6. 


Helena. 


Charlotte. 


St. Louis. 


$5.54 












$5.54 
751. 59 
22,605.16 
29,702.05 

28.335.68 
219.96 

53.493.68 
18.89 

50,875.00 
859,372. 87 
2,492,994.66 
121, 280. 94 
430.44 
3, 707. 26 
464.40 
40,977.83 
.61 

345,579. 46 
16.01 
670.03 
167.24 
81, 340. 28 












13, 503. 58 
172.75 
6,869.20 


$75. 20 
1.30 
16,790. 57 
















$11. 31 
4,464.69 




$1.99 






$217.05 


33,622.21 
13. 13 
37,417. 76 
842, 165. 46 
209.95 
110, 441.44 
26. 05 
9. 58 


35.03 


$16, 197. 90 


1,923.91 


13.95 


1.26 








13.02 


12. 78 




17, 121.08 




/. . 






1,470. 11 








4, 177. 33 






369. 85 


102. 70 


. 1,805.61 








464.40 




40, 977. 83 
23 

147, 001. 22 
8.56 




1 
















4.29 








1.29 






3.62 






526. 16 






163.77 








73, 056. 20 








6. 11 






i 


1, 305, 500. 75 
2, 438, 280. 09 


18, 715. 75 


18,003. 51 


19, 573. 14 


1,056.18 


8, 689.70 


4, 133, 009. 58 
61,375,988.45 












3,743,780.84 


18,715. 75 

1 


18,003. 51 


19, 573. 14 


1, 056. 18 


8, 689. 70 


65,508,998.03 



Digitized by Google 






148 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



VII. — Bars Manufactured of Gold and Silver, by 



Description 


COINAGE MINTS. 


Philadelphia. 


San Francisco. 


Carson. 


New Orleans. 


GOLD. 


Standard ozt. 
61, 502. 643 


Standard ozt. 


Standard ozt. 


Standard ozt . 
11.904 


Mint bars 






Standard bars 










Unparted bars 










Total gold 










61,502. 643 






11.904 


SILVER. 

Fine bars 






24, 362. 14 


222, 420. 47 


529,787.03 




Mint bars 




Standard bars 










Unparted bars 










Total silver 










24, 362. 14 


222, 420. 47 


529,787.03 





VIII.— Bars Manufactured of Gold and Silver, by 



Description. 



Fine bars 

Mint bars 

Standard bars 

Unparted bars 

Total gold 

SILVER. 

Fine bars 

Mint bars 

Standard bars 

Unparted bars 

Total silver 

Total value gold and silver. 



COINAGE MINT8. 



Philadelphia. 



$1, 144, 235. 22 



1, 144, 235. 22 



28, 348. 67 



28, 348. 67 



1, 172, 583. 89 



San Francisco. 



$258, 816. 55 



258,816.55 



258, 816. 55 



Carson. 



New Orleans. 



$221.47 



$616,479.45 



616, 479. 45 



616,479.45 



221.47 



221.47 



Digitized by tjOOQle 





REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



149 



Weight, during Fiscal Year ended June 30, 1891. 



ASSAT OFFICES. 


Total. 


New York. 


Denver. 


Bois6. 


Helena. 


Charlotte. 


St. Louis. 


Standard oz * . 
1,195,803.207 
212,254. 275 
16,773.237 
11.184 


Standard oz*. 


Standard oz *. 


Standard oz*. 


Standard oz*. 
367.771 


Standard oz*. 


Standard oz*. 
1,257,685.525 
212,254.245 
16,773.237 
188, 434. 834 




















63,624. 324 


36,481.589 


50, 997. 255 


12, 167. 039 


25, 153. 443 


1,424, 841.903 


63,624.324 


36, 481. 589 


50, 997. 255 


12, 534. 810 


25, 153. 443 


1, 675, 147. 871 


4,304,883.64 
152, 868. 64 
54,605.74 
1,898,985.17 


■■ 


■ ■ 








5, 081,453. 28 
152, 868.64 
54,695.74 
1,962,094.44 












■EBB 










17, 107. 19 


17,074.78 


17,290. 61 


920.07 


10,716.62 


6,411,433.19 


17, 107. 19 


17, 074. 78 


17,290.61 


920.07 


10,716.62 


7,251,112. 10 



VALUE, DURING FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1891. 



A88AY OFFICES. 


Total. 


New York. 


Denver. 


Bois6. 


Helena. 


Charlotte. 


St Louis. 


$22, 247, 501. 53 
3, 948, 916.75 
312, 060. 22 
208.07 








$6,842.25 




$23,398, 800.47 
3,948,916.75 
312,060.22 
3, 505,764.33 




















$1, 183, 708. 35 


$678, 727. 24 


$948, 786. 14 


226, 363. 51 


$467,971.02 


26. 508 686. 57 


1, 183, 708. 35 


678, 727. 24 


948, 786. 14 


233.205.76 


467,971.02 


31, 165,541.77 


5, 009, 319. 14 
177, 883. 51 
63,645.95 
2, 209,728.20 












5,912,963.81 
177,883.51 
63,645.95 
2, 283, 164.38 


















I 




19, 906. 54 


19, 868. 83 


20, 119. 94 




12, 470. $4 


7,460,576. 80 


19, 906. 54 


19,868.83 


20, 119. 94 


1,070.63 


12, 470. 24 


8,437,657.65 


33, 960, 263. 37 


1,203,614.89 


~ 6987596707” 


968, 906. 08 


234, 276. 39 


480,441.26 


39,603, 199.42 



Digitized by Google 



















X. — Coinage Executed at the Mints of the United States 




Double eagles . 



Half eagles 

Quarter eagles . 



Total gold. 



Dollars 

Subsidiary : 



pim.AnigT.pmA. 


SAN FRANCISCO. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


Pieces. 


Value. 




MINOR. 

Five cents 



Total minor . 



16 , 802,590 


16 , 802 , 590.00 


12. 590 

80.590 
9 , 911, 541 


6 , 295. 00 
20 , 147. 50 
991 , 154. 10 


10 , 004,721 


1 , 017 , 596. 60 


26 , 807, 311 


17 , 820 , 186.60 


16 , 259, 272 
57 , 182, 854 


812 , 963.60 

571 , 828.54 


73 , 442, 126 


1 , 384 , 792. 14 


100 , 396, 616 


21 , 348 , 981.24 








8 , 230,373 8 , 230 , 373.00 



142 , 307. 60 



142 , 307. 60 
8 , 372 , 680 . 60 



1 , 423,076 



1 , 423,076 | 
9 , 653,449 









































151 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1891. 



CARSON. 


NEW ORLEANS. 


TOTAL. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


29,694 
70,232 
175, 800 








1,103,144 
117, 010 
181,689 
12, 311 


$22,062,880.00 
1, 170, 100. 00 
908,445.00 
30,777.50 














;if rnmmmmu 








275,726 


2, 175, 200.00 






1,414, 154 


24,172,202.50 






2, 109,041 


2,109,041.00 


9,870,913 


$9, 870, 913. 00 


*36,232,802 


36,232,802.00 










165, 275 
780, 475 
17,614,621 


82,637.50 
195, 118.75 
1,761,462.10 






















Mf ; , - JgM 












18, 560, 371 


2,039,218.35 










2,109,041 


2,109,041.00 


9, 870, 913 


9, 870,913.00 


54,793,173 


38, 272,020.35 




mm 


mm 




13.338.275 

50.002. 275 


666.913. 75 

500.022.75 






















i 


63, 340, 550 


1,166,936.50 






i ! 


2,384,767 


4,284,241.00 


9, 870,913 


9, 870, 913. 00 


119,547,877 


63,611,159.35 



* Coined under act February 28, 1878 $8, 740, 327. 00 

Coined under act July 14, 1890 27, 292, 475. 00 

Coined from trade-dollar bullion 200, 000. 00 



Total 36,232,802. 00 



DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1890. 



CARSON. 


NEW ORLEANS. 


TOTAL. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


91,209 

17,500 

53,800 


$1, 824, 180.00 

175. 000. 00 

269.000. 00 






969,954 
75, 543 
58, 128 
8,813 


$19,399,080.00 

755.430.00 

290.640.00 
22, 032. 50 






















162,509 


2, 268, 180. 00 




■ m 


1,112,438 20,467,182.50 






2,309,041 


2,309,041.00 


10, 701, 000 


$10, 701. 000. 00 


38, 043,004 


38,043,004.00 










12.590 

80.590 
11, 334, 617 


6,295.00 
20, 147. 50 
1, 133,461. 70 






















HiiiiAiiaiiiiiiifl 


IHiilllllMNAIilll 










11, 427, 797 


1,159,904.20 










2,309, 041 


2,309,041.00 


10, 701, 000 


10,701. 000.00 


49,470, 801 


39, 202,908.20 




fflSM 






16, 259, 272 
57, 182, 854 


812,963.60 

571.828.54 










nmM 


m 


BHSK 




m 








73, 442, 126 


1,384,792.14 










2,471,550 


4,577,221.00 


10,701,000 


10,701,000.00 


124, 025, 365 


61,054,882.84 



Digitized by tjOOQle 



































152 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XI. — Earnings ani> Expenditures of the United States Mints 

EARNINGS 

i 



Items. 


MINTS. 


Philadelphia. 


San Fran- 
cisco. 


New Orleans. 


Carson. 


Charges for parting and refining 

Charges for alloy 

Charge* for assaying, melting, and stamping..: 


$18,510.74 

419.53 


$49,492.63 

1,765.55 


$772.17 

10.21 


$37,960.28 

158.29 


Seigniorage on standard silver dollars 

Seigniorage or subsidiary silver 


2, 370, 175. 08 
92,434.48 
1, 050,144.31 
2,025.93 
1,043.39 
3,796.33 


1, 714, 830. 78 


1,722,412.65 


413,914.91 


Seigniorage on minor coins 








Profits on medals and proof coins 








Deposit melting-room grains and sweepings 

Surplus bullion returned by operative officers. . . 
Gain on bullion shipped mint for coinage 


463.78 

16,425.99 


173,63 

1,713.28 


284,99 

4,203.18 


Proceeds of sale of old material 

Receipts from assays of bullion 


905.55 

278.00 


700.29 


370.02 


345.50 

12.09 

4,074.00 


Receipt from sale of by-products 


1, 070. 68 




Total 






3, 539,733.34 


1,784,749.70 


1,725,451.96 


460,953.15 





EXPENDITURES 



Salaries of officers and clerks 


41,364.56 


41,100.00 


31,908.77 


29,550.00 


Wages of workmen and adjusters 


417,450.70 


210,865.86 


127, 209.61 


78,631.57 


Contingent expenses, less amount paid to reim- 










burse wastage and loss on sweeps sold 


93,283.81 


47,619.45 


42,045.38 


26,485.68 


Parting and refining expenses, less amount paid 










to reimburse wastage and loss on sweeps sold. 


19, 181. 37 


64,987.08 


286.13 


35,325.99 


Wastages of the operative departments 


2,567.84 


3, 261.74 


2,774.97 


3,682.50 


Loss on sweeps sold during the year 


2,900.62 


3,217.64 


1,904.24 


2,972.58 


Expenses of distributing silver dollars 


4, 846.41 


10, 198. 65 


32,693.71 


3,113.87 


Expenses of distributing subsidiary silver coins. 


2, 051. 52 








Expenses of distributing minor coins 


29, 268. 86 








Minor-coinage metal wasted 


1, 188. 78 








Loss on sale of leady melts 


















Total 


614, 104.47 


381, 250. 42 


238,822.81 


179,762. 19 



Digitized by Google 





REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT, 



153 



and Assay Offices for the Fiscal Year ended June 30 , 1891 . 
AND GAINS. 



ASSAY OFFICES. 




New York. 


Denver. 


Bois6. 


Charlotte. 


Helena. 


St. Lonis. 


Total. 


$93,210.97 

1,418.10 












$199,946.79 
3,771.68 
4,506.86 
6,221,333.42 
92,434.48 
1,050,144.31 
2,025.93 
8,155.20 
39,393.14 
4,752.33 
2,475.56 
2, 109. 50 
19,480.42 












$1,496.82 


$869.68 

_ t 


$304.69 


$1, 210. 59 


$625.08 








































4,865.48 

13,254.36 


348.10 


125.79 




640.62 


209.42 




1,603.76 

1.20 


685.62 


792. 71 


1, 050. 65 


529.59 


47.55 


54.95 


25.50 


25.00 


738.00 

14,335.74 


44.00 


179.50 


518.00 


324.00 


16.00 












127,870.20 


3, 583.88 


1,860.50 


1, 670. 35 


3, 251.36 


1,405.09 


7,650,529.62 



AND LOSSES. 



39, 250 00 
24,636.75 


10,950.00 

13,706,25 


3, 200.00 
5, 857. 50 


2,750.00 
1, 116. 90 


7,571.75 

12,587.00 


3, 500.00 
912.50 


211,145.08 

892,974.64 


10, 000. 00 
95,312.10 


2,431.48 


1, 630.40 


882.86 


4,478.07 


1,486.89 


230, 344.02 

215,092.67 
12,287.05 
15,850.41 
50,852.64 
2, 051. 52 
29,268.86 
1,188.78 
84.16 












4,855.33 






















■V I 












■ 
























84.16 






















174,138.34 


27,087.73 


10, 687. 90 


4,749.76 


24, 636. 82 


5,899.39 


1,661,139.83 



Digitized by Google 
















154 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Dr. 



XII. — Seigniorage on the Coinage of Silver 



1890 . 

July 1. Balance on hand: 

Philadelphia 

San Francisco 

New Oneans 

Carson 

Seigniorage on silver dollars : 

Philadelphia 

San Francisco 

New Orleans 

Carson 



Seigniorage on subsidiary silver: 
Philadelphia 




$ 246 , 852. 57 

21 . 774. 36 

20 . 527. 37 
13 , 505. 21 



2 , 370 , 175. 08 
1 , 714 , 830.78 
1 , 722 , 412. 65 
413 , 914. 91 



$ 302 , 659.51 

6 , 221 , 333. 42 
92 , 434. 48 





REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



155 



and Deposition op the same, during the Fiscal Year 1891. 



Paid expenses of distribution: 

Philadelphia $6, 897. 93 

San Francisco 10, 198. 65 

New Orleans 32, 693. 71 

Carson 3,113.87 



Paid on account of wastage and loss on sale of sweeps : 

Philadelphia 1,264.85 

New Orleans 4, 324. 35 

Carson 941. 70 



Deposited in the U. S. Treasury as follows : 

PHILADELPHIA. 

Warrant No. 475 648.75 

No. 476 246,203.82 

No. 1067 450,000.00 

No. 1093 195, 000. 00 

No. 1100 29,756.18 

No. 1101 5. 00 

No. 1102 175,000.00 

No. 1363 110,000.00 

No. 1456 950,000.00 

No. 1720 80,000.00 

No. 1721 400,000.00 



SAN PBANCISCO. 

Warrant No. 479 21, 774. 36 

No. 1094 85,000.00 

No. 1099 203,427.65 

No. 1103 75,000.00 

No. 1360 170,000.00 

No. 1453 300,000.00 

No. 1723 840,000.00 



NEW ORLEANS. 

Warrant No. 477 20,353.26 

No. 1068 522,893.44 

No. 1095 100,000.00 

No. 1096 174. 11 

No. 1097 275,000.00 

No. 1362 130,000.00 

No. 1455 225,000.00 

No. 1722 400,000.00 



CAR80N. 

Warrant No. 478 13, 505. 21 

No. 1098 160,935.22 

No. 1361 40,000.00 

No. 1454 75,000.00 

No. 1724 110, 000. 00 



1891. 

June 30. Balance on hand : 
Philadelphia . 
San Francisco. 
New Orleans . 
Carson 



64,685.60 
31,204.48 
32, 501. 15 
23,924. 12 



Total. 



Cr. 

T 



$52,904. 16 



6,530.90 



2,636,613.75 



1,695,202.01 



1,673,420.81 



399,440.43 



152,315.35 

6,616,427.41 



Digitized by Google 




156 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XIII.— Assets and Liabilities op United 
ASSETS. 





GOLD BULLION. 


SILVER BULLION. 


Value of 


. Institutions. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Value. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Value (cost). 


shipped for 
coinage. 


COINAGE MINTS. 
Philadelphia 


1,731,646.104 


$32,216,671.25 


29, 498, 524. 19 


$27,428,669.69 




San Francisco 


105, 106. 598 


1, 955,471.47 


1.475,445. 10 


1,336,159.12 




New Orleans 


46,052.578 


873,536.87 


3, 192, 285. 16 


3, 688, 661. 31 




Carson 

ASSAY OFFICES. 


55, 924. 157 


1, 040,449.44 


345, 226. 99 


309, 520. 57 




New York 

De.nvor 


1,354, 397.428 
3, 206. 584 


25,198,091.46 

59,657.38 


429, 907. 06 
855.05 


429, 012. 48 
743.89 




Helena 


2, 601. 071 


48,392.03 


923.70 


803.61 


$12,074.68 


Bois6 


1, 881.777 


35, 009. 83 


449.68 


391.22 


24,262.07 


Charlotte 










16,516.93 


St. Lonis 


834, 319 


15, 522. 23 


312.73 


272.08 




Total 


3, 302, 550. 616 


61,442,801.96 


34, 943, 929. 66 

1 


| 33,094,233.97 


52,853.68 



LIABILITIES. 







REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



157 



States Mints and Assay Offices, June 30, 1891. 

ASSETS. 



Gold coin. 


Silver coin. 


Treasury 

notes. 


Minor coin. 


Minor coin- 
age metal. 


Old deficien- 
cies. 


Total. 


$1,374,072.60 

6.413.355.00 
170,000.00 

1.953.835.00 

20,506,165.51 
52,157.12 
16,538.01 
20,165.88 
25, 597. 09 
13,411.77 


$51,221,249.35 

36,428,488.35 

10,891,867.19 

2,885,248.38 

55,435.58 


$331, 549. 69 
971,481.11 
307, 102. 62 
501,921. 16 


$63,809.35 


$67,615.04 




$112,703,636.87 
47, 518, 513. 01 
15, 831, 167. 99 
6,690,974.55 

46,188, 705.03 
112, 558. 39 
77, 808. 33 
79,829.00 
42, 114. 02 
29,206.08 


$413, 557. 96 
































1 


































1 








! 


j 30,545,297.88 101,482,288.85 

i 1 


2, 112,054.58 


63, 809.35 


67, 615.04 


413,557.96 


229,274,513.27 



LIABILITIES. 



Seigniorage on 
silver. 


Unpaid deposit- 
ors. 


Minor coinage 
profits. 


Minor coin 
metal fund. 


Unpaid cent 
depositors and 
subtreasury 
transfers. 


Total. 


$64,685.60 
31,204.48 
32,501.15 
23, 924. 12 


$53,883.80 

613.10 

73.79 


$81, 435. 90 


$20, 000.00 


$29,988.49 


$112, 703, 636. 87 
47,518,513.01 
15,831, 167.99 
6,690,974.55 

46,188,705.03 

112,558.39 

77,808.33 

79,829.00 

42,114.02 

29,206.08 














791. 10 


































































152,315.35 


55,361.79 


81,435.90 


20, 000.00 


29,988.49 


229,274,513.27 



Digitized by Google 















158 REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

XIV.— Medals Manufactured at the Mint at Philadelphia, during the 
Fiscal Year ended June 30 , 1891. 



Name. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Bronze. 


Army marksmanship : 


2 




1 




6 




1 






i 12 


1 






5 






10 








5 


Cavalry competition : 


4 




1 






12 


1 






25 






12 




2 


20 

1 








50 






Department of marksmanship : 


9 




1 




24 


1 






49 

1 


Division marksmanship : 






Second-class prize 






1 


Third-class pri*« 






1 




1 


1 








15 








8 


Grant, U. S., President 






14 


Green, Nathaniel 






10 


Grant’s monument. 






150 


Harrison, Beiyamin, Indian peace 




26 


5 


Harrison, Benjamin, President 






5 


Harrison, W. H., President 






10 


Horn, John 






5 


Ingraham, Captain 






G 


Ketcliam Jessie 


6 


65 




Kimball James P 


1 


Life-Saving 


11 


11 

' 




Leech, E. 0., Director 


5 


Life-Saving Service and service bar 


1 


x 




Lincoln Grammar School 




25 




Lincoln, Abraham, President 




10 


Mall, Railway Service 


12 

55 




Massachusetts Charitable and Mechanics’ Association 


174 

4 


141 


Massachusetts Rifle Association 


1 


4 


Massachusetts Humane Society 


4 


14 




Marksmen, Competition of Distinguished : 

First-class prize 


2 


1 


Second-class prize 




4 


1 


Masons, Grand Lodge of Rhode Island 






1,000 

5 


Metis 






Norman. 


1 




6 


New England Agricultural Society 




15 




Oswego Oonnty Agricultural Society 




11 




Pharmacy, Philadelphia College of 


2 




Philadelphia Rifle Club 


2 


^ 20 






z I m | 

Digitized by VjOOQLC 




REPORT OF THE 1HRECTOR OF THE MINT. 159 



XIV. — Medals Manufactured at the Mint of the United States at Phila- 
delphia, etc. — Continued. 



Name. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Bronze. 


Pitfahnrg FatyioIa OaIIa^a (MrRee) 


1 






Pennsylvania Historical Society 




9 




Pauline 




1 




Pennsylvania Volunteers (Lake Erie) 






5 


Revolver Match : 

First prize. 


4 




1 






12 


1 






25 


St. Louis Agricultural and Mechanical Association 


1 




St. John's Commandery No. 4 






50 


United States Naval Institute 


1 




Vanderbilt University 


9 






Vessel Owners’ so<l Captains’ Association 




2 




Watson 


1 






Washington and Lee University 


3 






Washington Wreath Medalets 




1,000 

22 




Washington and Lincoln Medalets 






Windom, William 




16 








Total 


191 


| 1,502 


1,600 





XV. — Coinage Dies Executed at the Mint at Philadelphia during the 

Fiscal Year 1891. 



Denomination. 


Philadel- 

phia. 


San Fran- 
cisco. 


Carson. 


New Or- 
leans. 


Total. 


GOLD COINAGE. 


2 


30 


10 




42 

26 




6 


16 


4 




5 




16 




21 

4 




4 



















Total 


17 


30 


42 


4 


| 93 






SILVER COINAGE. 

Standard dollars 


81 


73 


40 


100 


294 


Half dollars 


10 


10 

59 


Qimrtfir dollars 


39 


20 






Dimes 


1 

182 1 


60 




20 


262 








Total 


312 


153 


40 


120 


625 






MINOR COINAGE. 

Five- cent 


146 








146 

340 


One-cent 


340 
















Total 


486 








486 











TOTAL NUMBER OF DIES. 



Gold coinage 93 

Silver coinage 625 

Minor coinage 486 

Proof coinage 20 

Secretary Windom 3 

Director of tlie Mint 2 

Superintendent of the Mint 2 

Indian peace 2 

Annual assay ‘2 

Railway Mail Service 2 



Total. 



!.237 

Digitized by VjOOQlC 







160 REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

XVI. — Expenditures from Silver Profit Fund on Account of Transporta- 
tion of Silver Coin during Fiscal Year 1891 . 



Quarter. 


MINT AT PHILADELPHIA. 


MINT AT SAN FRANCISCO. 


Transpor- 
tation of 
standard 
silver 
dollars. 


Transpor- 
tation of 
subsidi- 
ary silver. 


Aw 

bor, and 
incident- 
als. 


Total. 


Transpor- 
tation of 
standard 
silver 
dollars. 


Trans- 
porta- 
tion of 
subsidi- 
ary sil- 
ver. 


Bags, 
boxes, la- 
bor, and 
incident- 
als. 


Total. 


Third quarter, 1890. . . 
Fourth quarter, 1890. 
First quarter, 1891 . . . 
Second quarter, 1891 . . 


$1,023.78 
1, 262. 50 
994.50 
976.00 


$264. 15 
517. 15 
299.35 
514.25 


$36.00 

378.89 

88.90 

542.46 


$1,323.93 
2, 158. 54 
1,382.75 
2,032.71 


$2, 226. 30 

2. 726. 55 

1.720.55 
993.80 




$603.65 

900.33 

465.10 

562.37 


$2,829.95 
3.626.88 
2, 185. 65 
1,556.17 




4,256.78 


1,594.90 


1,046.25 


6,897.93 


7,667.20 




2,531.45 


10,198.65 


Quarter. 


MINT AT NEW ORLEANS. 


MINT AT CARSON. 


Transpor- 
tation of 
standard 
silver 
dollars. 


Transpor- 
tation of 
subsidi- 
ary silver. 


A, 

bor, and 
incident- 
als. 


Total. 


Transpor- 
tation of 
standard 
silver 
dollars. 


Trans- 
porta- 
tion of 
subsid- 
ary sil- 
ver. 


Bags, 
boxes, la- 
bor, and 
incident- 
als. 


Total. 


Third quarter, 1890. . . 
Fourth quarter, 1890. 
First quarter, 1891 . . . 
Second quarter, 1891. . 


$9, 920. 75 ! 
6, 893. 34 
4, 049. 17 
10,287.93 




$444.41 

752.89 

249.00 

96.22 


$10, 365. 16 
7, 646.23 
4,298.17 
10,384.15 


$927. 35 
1, 545. 48 
407.69 
233. 35 






$927.35 

1,545.48 

407.69 

233.35 


31,151.19 




1,542.52 


32,693. 71 


3, 113. 87 






3,113.87 



XVII. — Expenditures for Distribution of Minor Coins from July 1 , 1878 , 

to June 30 , 1891 . 



Fiscal year. 



Amount 

expended. 



1879. 

1880. 
1881. 
1882. 

1883. 

1884. 

1885. 

1886. 

1887. 

1888. 

1889. 

1890. 

1891. 



$1,299.97 

12.592.83 
23,763.46 

24. 565.84 

28. 512.54 
29, 152. 32 
12,251.98 

847.17 

15.914.55 
24, 500. 78 
23,441.04 
23, 923. 76 
29,268.86 



Total 



250.035.10 



Digitized by ^.ooQle 









REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 161 

XVIII. — Wastage and Loss on Sale of Sweeps, Fiscal Year 1891 . 



Losses. 


MINT AT — 


Assay 

office, 

New 

York. 


Total. 


Philadel- 

phia. 


San Fran- 
cisco. 


New 

Orleans. 


Carson. 




$42. 20 


$889.71 




$187. 93 
3, 103. 95 
390. 62 
2,972.58 




$1,119.84 
3, 103. 95 
8, 063. 26 
15, 850. 41 








Coiner’s silver wastage 

Loss on sale of sweeps 

Total 

Paid as follows : 

From contingent appropriation 


2,525.64 
2, 900. 62 


2, 372. 03 
3, 217. 64 


$2, 774. 97 
1,904.24 


$4, 855.33 


5, 468.46 


6, 479. 38 


4, 679. 21 


6,655.08 


4, 855. 33 


28, 137. 46 


244.82 

238.46 
3, 720. 33 
1,264.85 






289.44 

409.93 
5, 014. 01 
941. 70 




534. 26 

674.96 
20, 397. 34 
6, 530. 90 


From parting and refining appropri- 
ation 




26.57 

328.29 

4,324.35 




From surplus bullion 

From silver profit fund 

Total 


6, 479. 38 


4, 855. 33 


5, 468. 46 


6, 479. 38 


4, 679. 21 


6,655.08 | 4,855.33 


28, 137.46 



XI X.— Monthly Purchases of Silver Bullion, under Act of February 28 , 

1878 , Fiscal Year, 1891 . 



Months. 


PHILADELPHIA. 


SAN FRANCISCO. 


Fine ounces. 


Cost. 


Fine ounces. 


Cost. 


1891. 

July 


1, 383, 323, 031 
207, 976, 392 


$1,488, 513.26 
234, 135. 40 


255,941,091 

127,881,261 


$280. 130. 51 
143, 931. 79 


August . 


Total 


1, 591,299, 423 


1, 722, 648. 66 


383,822,352 


424, 062. 30 





Months. 


NEW ORLEANS. 


CARSON. 


TOTAL. 


Fine ounces. 


Cost. 


Fine ounces. 


Cost. 


Fine ounces. 


Cost. 


1891. 

Jllly 


377, 702. 343 
. 242, 236. 638 


$407,785.36 

273,790.95 


94, 631, 022 
107, 687, 745 


$100, 023. 34 
121, 115. 85 


2, 111, 597, 487 
685, 782, 036 


2, 276, 452.47 
772, 973.99 


August 


Total 


619, 938. 981 


681, 576. 31 


202,318,767 


221,139.19 


2, 797, 379, 523 


3, 049, 426. 46 





10285 M 11 



Digitized by 



Google 




162 REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XX. — Monthly Purchases of Silver Bullion under Act of July 14, 1890, 

Fiscal Year 1891. 





PHILADELPHIA. 


BAN FRANCISCO. 


jmnrcns. 


Fine ounces. 


Cost. 


Fine ounces. 


Cost. 


1890. 

August 


2,627,475. 480 


$3,115,526.36 


631,987,245 


$739,061.69 


September 


2, 948, 193. 171 


3,447,506.33 


571,878.702 


666,873.96 


October 


3, 732, 345. 414 


4, 133,815.13 


707, 337.675 


778,471.02 


November 


3, 563, 913. 915 


3, 654, 060. 35 


464,447.790 


484,300.28 


December 


2,764,281.969 


2,925, 685.84 


1,201, 876.416 


1,271,659.14 


1891. 

January 


! 

3,245,961.888 


3,421,457.95 


879,697.854 


925,729.78 


February 


3, 504, 579. 804 


2,518, 792.17 


521, 313. 264 


523,446.30 


March 


3, 875, 434. 524 


3, 833, 131.83 


399,795.363 


394,468.59 


April 


3, 738, 003. 165 


3, 661, 080. 09 


539, 680. 113 


529,017. 89 


May 


3, 278, 877. 147 


3, 218, 503. 10 


517,741.083 


507,654. 19 


June 


3, 572, 933. 076 


3, 527, 583. 68 


709, 205. 580 


700,212.26 


Total 


36,851,999.553 


38,457,142.83 


7, 144. 96L 085 


7,520,895. 10 





NEW ORLEANS. 


CARSON. 


TOTAL. 




Fine ounces. 


Cost. 


Fine ounces. 


Cost. 


Fine ounces. 


Cost. 


1890. 














August 


248, 677. 362 


$286, 761. 99 


748.107 


$863.34 


3,508, 888. 194 


$4,142,213.38 


September 


252, 457. 506 


294, 602. 13 


113, 168. 889 


133,038.05 


3, 885, 698. 268 


4,542,020.47 


October 


278, 970. 930 


311, 440. 32 


121, 627. 035 


135, 266. 15 


4, 840. 281.054 


5. 358, 992. 62 


November 


375, 260.391 


391, 086. 40 


105, 847. 326 


111,453.94 


4, 509, 469.422 


4,640, 900.97 


December 


304, 899. 561 


327, 536. 19 


240,287.202 


252,295.32 


4, 511, 345. 148 


4,777,176. 49 


1891. 












U4W.jai.fi 


January 


343,945. 143 


362,542.61 


99, 777. 762 


104,401.45 


4, 569,382.647 


4,814,131.79 


February 


292, 258. 764 


296,473.74 


51, 162. 669 


52,313.34 


4, 369, 314. 501 


4,391,025.55 


March 


218, 439. 468 


215, 429. 78 


53, 525. 664 


52,547.84 


4, 547, 195.019 


4,495,578.04 


April 


299,727.207 


294, 076. 43 


100, 164. 915 


98,209.91 


4,677,575.400 


4,582,384.32 


May 


163,580.625 


160, 805. 31 


159, 904.278 


156,589.25 


4,120,103.133 


1 4,043,551.85 


June 


415,959.660 


409, 247. 68 


155, 761. 947 


152, 479. 34 


4,853,860.263 j 


| 4,789,522.96 


Total.... 


3,194,176.617 


3,350,002.58 


1,201,975.794 


1,249,457.93 


48,393,113.049 


50, 577, 496. 44 



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EEPOET OF THE DIEECTOE OF THE MINT. 163 

XXI.— Monthly Purchases of Silver Bullion, during Fiscal Year 1891, 
UNDER THE ACTS OF FEBRUARY 28, 1878 AND JULY 14, 1890. 



Months. 


pmT.ATrar.POTA. 


SAN FRANCISCO. . 


Fine ounces. 


Cost. 


Fine ounces. 


Cost. 


1890. 










July 


1, 383, 323. 031 


$1, 488, 513. 26 


255,941,091 


$280, 130. 51 


August 


2, 835, 451. 872 


3, 349, 661. 76 


759, 868. 506 


882,993.48 


September 


2,948, 193. 171 


3, 447, 506. 33 


571,878.702 


666,873.96 


October 


3, 732, 345. 414 


4,133, 815.13 


707, 337. 675 


778,471.02 


November 


3, 563, 913. 915 


3, 654,060. 35 


464, 447. 790 


484,300.28 


December 


2, 764, 281. 969 


2, 925, 685. 84 


1,201,876.416 


1,271,659. 14 


1891. 








i 


January 


3,245,961.888 


3,421,457.95 


879,697.854 


925,729. 78 


February 


3, 504, 579, 804 


3, 518, 792. 17 j 


521,818.264 


523, 446. 30 


March 


3, 875, 434. 524 


3,833,131.83 


399, 795. 363 


394, 468. 59 


April 


3, 738, 003. 165 


3,661,080.09 


539,680. 113 


529, 017. 89 


May 


3, 278, 877. 147 


3, 218, 503. 10 


517,741.083 


507,654.19 


June 


3, 572, 933. 076 


3, 527, 583. 68 


709,205.580 


700,212.26 


Total 


38, 443, 298. 976 


40, 179, 791. 49 


7,528,783.437 


7,944,957.40 



Months. 


NEW ORLEANS. 


CARSON. 


TOTAL. 


Fine ounces. 


Cost. 


Fine ounces. 


Cost. 


Fine ounces. 


Cost. 


1890. 

July 


377,702.343 


$407, 785. 36 


. 94,631.022 


$100, 023. 34 


2, 111,597.487 


$2,276,452.47 


August 


490, 914.000 


560, 552. 94 


108, 435. 852 


121, 979. 19 


4, 194, 670. 230 


4, 915, 187. 37 


September 


252,457.506 


.294, 602. 13 


113, 168. 889 


133,038. 05 


3, 885, 698. 268 


4, 542, 020. 47 


October 


278,970.930 


311, 440. 32 


121, 627. 035 


135, 266. 15 


4, 840, 281.054 


5,358,992.62 


November 


375, 260,391 


391, 086. 40 


105, 847. 326 


111,453.94 


4, 509, 469.422 


4,640, 900.97 


December 


304, 899. 561 


327, 536. 19 


240, 287. 202 


252, 295. 32 


4, 511, 345. 148 


4,777,176.49 


1891. 

January 


343, 945. 143 


362, 542. 61 


99, 777. 762 


104,401.45 


] 

4,569,382.647 


4,814,131.79 


February 


292, 258. 764 


296, 473. 74 


51, 162. 669 


52, 313. 34 


4, 369, 314. 501 


4,391, 025.55 


March 


218, 439. 468 


215,429.78 


53, 525. 664 


52,547.84 


4,547,195. 019 


4,495,578.04 


April 


299,727^207 


294,076.43 


100, 164. 915 


98, 209.P1 


4,677,575.400 


4, 582,384.32 


May 


163, 580. 625 


160, 805. 31 


159,904.278 


156, 589. 25 


4, 120, 103. 133 


4,043,551.85 


June 


415,959,660 


409, 247. 68 


155, 761. 947 


152,479.34 


4,853,860.263 


4,789,522.96 


Total.... 


3, 814, 115. 598 


4, 031, 578. 89 


1,404,294.561 


1,470, 597.12 


51, 190,492.572 


|53, 626, 924. 90 



Digitized by Google 





164 REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

XXII.— Quantity and Cost of Silver used in the Coinage of Silver Dollars^ 



PHILADELPHIA. 



Month. 


COINED. 


Standard ounces. 


Cost. 


1890. 


515. 625.00 

130. 625. 00 


$486,066.95 

123,764.22 


August 


September 


Total 






646,250.00 ; 609.83L17 





SAN FRANCISCO. 



Month. 



1890. 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

Total 



COINED. 


WASTED AND SOLD IN 
SWEEPS. 


Standard ounces. 


Cost. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


687, 500. 00 


$628, 278. 71 


2,610.20 


$2, 339. 43 


395, 312, 50 


367, 554.94 






85, 937. 50 


79, 903. 25 




. 1 


64, 453. 13 


59, 927. 44 




j 


341, 492. 42 


317, 513.93 




' 


1, 574, 695. 55 


1,453,178.27 


2,610.20 j 


2, 339. 43 



NEW ORLEANS. 



1890. 

July 


601, 562. 50 

395. 312. 50 
128, 906.25 

429. 687. 50 
429, 687. 50 

825, 859.37 

' 

859, 375. 00 
429. 687. 50 
355, 851.72 


$567,047.91 
382,450.46 
122,482.09 
408, 273. 65 
408, 273.65 
784,701.95 

816, 547. 30 
408, 273. 65 
338, 117. 56 


1,254.95 


$1, 182. 95 














November 

December 

1891. 


681.94 

694.22 


647.95 

659.62 


February 


083. 72 


649.64 








May 


5, 011. 00 


4, 761. 29 






Total 






4,460,940.84 j 

1 ! 


4,240,929.51 


3, 314. 83 


3,140.16 


CARSON. 


1890. 












171, 875. 00 


$155, 212. 77 






J 


171, 875. 00 


158, 619.93 






September 


171, 875. 00 


158, 619.93 


1,481.75 


$1, 367. 48 




171, 875. 00 


158, 619. 93 








82, 500. 00 


76, 137. $6 








59, 332. 10 


54, 756. 38 














Total 


829, 332. 10 


761,960.50 


1, 481. 75 


1,367.48 



Digitized by 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 165 

WASTED AND SOLD IN SWEEPS, FISCAL YEAR 1891 , UNDER ACT OF FEBRUARY 28 , 1878 . 

PHILADELPHIA. 



WASTED AND SOLD IN SWEEPS. 


TOTAL EMPLOYMENT. 


Dollars coined. 


Seigniorage. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


Standard ounces. 


Cost. 


1,274.68 

3,542.30 


$1,178.04 

3,327.96 


515, 625. 00 
131,899.68 
3,542.30 


$486, 066. 95 
124, 942. 26 
3, 327.96 


600,000 

152,000 


$113,933.05 
28,235. 78 


4, 816. 98 


4,506.00 


651,066.98 


614, 337. 17 


752,000 


142, 168. 83 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



BALANCE TBAN8FEBBED TO 
ACCOUNT OP 1890. 


TOTAL EMPLOYMENT. 


Dollars coined. 


Seigniorage. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


Standard ounces. 


Coat. 


0.61 


$0.57 


690, 110. 20 
395, 312. 50 
85,937.50 
64, 453. 13 
341,492.42 


$630, 618. 14 
367, 554.94 
79, 903. 25 
59,927.44 
317, 513. 93 


800,000 

460.000 

100.000 
75,000 

397, 373 


$171,721.29 

92.445.06 
20,096.75 
15,072.56 

79. 859. 07 


.61 | .57 

i 


1, 577,305.75 


1,455,517.70 , 


1,832,373 


379, 194. 73 



NEW ORLEANS. 







1 






i 























.61 


$0.58 


.61 


.58 



602, 817. 45 


$568,230.86 


700,000 


$132,952.09 


395, 312. 50 


382, 450. 46 


460,000 


77,549.54 


128, 906. 25 


122, 482. 09 


150,000 


27, 517. 91 


429, 687. 50 


408, 273. 65 


600,000 


91, 726. 35 


430, 369.44 


408, 921. 60 


500,000 


91, 726. 35 


826, 553. 59 


785. 361. 57 


961,000 


176,298.05 


859, 375.00 


816, 547. 30 


1,000,000 


183, 452. 70 


430, 371. 22 


408, 923. 29 


500,000 


91, 726. 35 


355, 851. 72 


338, 117. 56 


414, 082 


75,964. 44 


5,011.00 


4, 761. 29 


5,831 


1,069. 71 


,464,255.67 


4,244,069.67 


5, 190,913 


949,983.49 



CARSON. 







171,875.00 
171, 875. 00 
173,356.75 
171,875.00 
82,500.00 
59, 332. 10 


$155,212.77 
158,619.93 
159,987.41 
158, 619.93 
76, 137. 56 
54, 756. 38 


200,000 

200,000 

200,000 

200,000 

96,000 

69,041 


$44,787.23 
41,380.07 
41, 380.07 
41,380.07 
19,862.44 
14,284.62 


















.66 


$0.59 


.66 


.59 


830,813.85 


.763, 333.98 


965, 041 


203,074.50 



Digitized by V joogle 















166 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XXII.— Quantity and Cost of Silver used in the Coinage of 
RECAPITULATION. 





COINED. 


WASTED AND SOLD IN 
8WEEP8. 




Standard ounces. 


Cost. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


1890. 

July 


1, 976, 562. 50 


$1, 836, 606. 34 


3,865.15 


$3,522.38 


August 


1, 093, 125. 00 


1,032,389.55 


1,274.68 


1,178.04 


Septembor 


386,718. 75 


361,005.27 


5,024. 05 


4, 695.44 


October 


666,015.63 


626,821.02 






November 


853; 679. 92 


801,925.14 


681.94 


647.95 


December 


885,191.47 


839, 458. 33 


694.22 


659.62 


1891. 

January 


859, 375. 00 


816, 547. 30 






February 


429, 687. 50 


408, 273. 65 


683.72 


649.64 


March 


355,851.72 


338, 117. 56 






April 










May 


5, 011.00 


4,761.29 






June 










Total 


7, 511, 218. 49 


7, 065, 905. 45 


12,223.76 


11,353.07 



XXIII. — Quantity and Cost of Silver used in the Coinage of Silver Dol 



PHILADELPHIA. 





COINED. 


Months. 


Standard ounces. 


Cost. 


1890. 

August 


859, 375. 00 


$917, 102. 72 


September 


1, 117, 187. 50 


1,185,106. 45 


October 


1, 289, 062. 50 


1, 323, 364. 55 


November 


1,375, 000.00 


1, 357, 394. 35 


December 


1, 375, 107.42 


1, 345, 183. 10 


• 1891. 

Janaary 


1, 375, 000. 00 


1,334, 837.60 


February 


1,031,250.00 


985,125.32 


March 


1, 031, 456. 25 


970,954.14 




859, 375. 00 


799,774.42 




1, 074, 218. 75 


992, 618. 37 




773, 532. 03 


711, 007. 73 


Total 


12, 160, 564.45 


11,922, 468.75 



Digitized by ^.ooQle 




I 



ItEPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF TfltE MINT, 



16 ? 



Silver Dollars, wasted and sold in Sweeps, etc.— C ontinued. 

RECAPITULATION. 





TOTAL EMPLOYMENT. 


Dollars coined. 


Seigniorage. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


Standard ounces. 


Cost. 






1, 980, 427. 65 
1, 094, 399. 68 
391, 742. 80 
666,015.63 
854, 361. 86 
885, 885. 69 

859, 375. 00 
430, 371. 22 
355,851.72 


$1, 840, 128. 72 
1,033,567. 59 
365, 700.71 
626, 821. 02 
802, 573. 09 
840,117.95 

816, 547. 30 
408, 923. 29 
338, 117. 56 




$463,393.66 
239, 610. 45 
88, 994. 73 
148, 178.98 
191,447.86 
190,582.67 

183,452.70 

91,726.35 

75,964.44 














.61 

.66 


$0.57 

.59 














.61 


.58 


5,011.00 


4,761.29 


5,831 


1,069. 71 










, . | ■■■■■■■I 




1.88 


1.74 


7, 523, 442. 25 


7,077,258.52 


8,740,327 


1,674,421. 55 



lars, Wasted and Sold in Sweeps, Fiscal Year, 1891, Act of July 14, 1890. 

PHILADELPHIA. 



WASTED AND SOLD IN SWEEPS. 


TOTAL EMPLOYMENT. 


Dollars coined. 
Pieces.. 


Seigniorage. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


Standard ounces. 


Cost. 








$917,102.72 
1, 185, 106. 45 

1. 323. 364. 55 
1, 357, 394. 35 

1.349.071.56 

1, 334, 837. 60 
985, 125. 32 
970,954. 14 
799,774. 42 
992, 618. 37 
718, 587.98 




$82, 897. 28 
114, 893. 55 
176, 635. 45 
242, 605. 65 
254,941.90 

265,162.40 
214,874.68 
229,285.86 
200,225.58 
257, 381. 63 
189, 102. 27 














3, 938. 89 


$3, 888. 46 


















8, 217. 88 


7, 580. 25 


12, 156. 77 


11,468. 71 


12, 172, 721. 22 


11,933,937.46 


14, 150,475 


2,228,006. 25 



Digitized by ^.ooQle 



















168 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XXllt. -Quantity and Cost of Silver used in the Coinaoe of 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Mouths. 



1890. 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1891. 

January 

February 

March - 1 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



COINED. 


Standard ounces. 


Cost. 


257,812.50 


$271, 343. 14 


515, 625. 00 


541,781.27 


502,734.37 


510,613.62 


232, 031.25 


228,887.60 


638,515.63 


618,044.58 


674,600.37 


648, 082. 18 


588,671.88 


558,353.65 


601,562.50 


564,280.88 


850, 375.00 


704, 800. 50 


730, 468. 75 


667, 820. 76 


859, 375.00 


778, 247. 68 


6,460,781.25 


6, 182, 363. 05 



NEW ORLEANS. 




1890. 
















68,750.00 

151.250.00 

171.875.00 

128.006.25 

163. 281.25 
65, 312. 50 
73, 906. 25 

159, 843. 75 


$68, 085. 21 
147,681. 15 

166,588.66 
124,090.88 
155,004.40 
60,385.30 
66, 956.94 
143, 467. 05 




1891. 




March 


April 








983, 125. 00 


033, 159.59 


Total | 



Digitized by V joogle 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT, 



169 



Silver Dollars, Wasted and Sold in Sweeps, etc.— C ontinued. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



WASTED AND SOLD IN SWEEPS. 


TOTAL EMPLOYMENT. 






Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


Standard ounces. 


Cost. 


Pieces. 


Seigniorage. 






257, 812. 50 


$271, 343. 14 


300,000 


$28, 656. 86 






515, 625. 00 


541,781.27 


600,000 


58, 218. 73 






502, 734. 37 


510, 613. 62 


585, 000 


74, 386. 38 






232, 031. 25 


228, 887. 69 


270,000 


41, 112. 31 






638, 515. 63 


618, 044. 58 


743,000 


124, 955. 42 






674, 609. 37 


648, 082. 18 


785,000 


136, 917. 82 






588, 671. 88 


558, 353. 65 


685,000 


126, 646. 35 






601, 562. 50 


564, 280. 88 


700, 000 


135, 719. 12 






859, 375. 00 


794, 899. 50 


1,000,000 


205, 100. 50 






730, 468. 75 


667, 829. 76 


850,000 


182, 170.24 


2, 619. 30 


$2, 372. 03 


861, 994. 30 


780, 619. 71 


1,000,000 


221, 752. 32 


2, 619.30 


2, 372. 03 


6, 463, 400. 55 


6, 184,735.98 


7,518,000 


1, 335, 636. 05 



NEW ORLEANS. 








240, 625. 00 
601,562.50 
429, 687. 50 
429, 687. 50 


$249, 614. 13 
626, 400. 25 
439, 678. 16 
416, 572. 03 


280,000 

700.000 

500.000 
500,000 


$30, 385. 87 
73,599. 75 
60,321.84 
83,427.97 














1 

4, 020. 74 

1,299.50 


$3, 686. 05 
1, 161. 87 


429,687.50 
429, 687. 50 
519, 645. 74 
343, 750. 00 
430, 987. 00 


407, 291. 31 
401, 429. 25 
476, 389. 93 
311, 998. 61 
385, 342. 38 


500,000 

500.000 

600.000 

400.000 

500.000 


92, 708. 69 
98, 570. 75 
127, 296. 12 
88, 001. 39 
115, 819. 49 


5, 320. 24 


4, 847. 92 


3, 855, 320. 24 


3, 714, 716. 05 


4,480,000 


770, 131. 87 



CARSON CITY. 







68, 750. 00 


$68, 985. 21 


80, 000. 00 


$11, 014. 79 






151, 250. 00 


147, 681. 15 


176, 000. 00 


28, 318. 85 






171, 875. 00 


166, 588. 66 


200, 000. 00 


33, 411. 34 






128, 906. 25 


124, 090. 88 


150, 000. 00 


25, 909. 12 






163, 281. 25 


155, 004. 40 


190, 000. 00 


34, 995. 60 






65, 312. 50 


60, 385. 30 


76, 000. 00 


15, 614. 70 




' 


73, 906. 25 


66, 956. 94 


86, 000. 00 


19, 043. 06 


7,176.67 


$0, 777. 77 


167, 020. 42 


150, 244. 82 


186, 000. 00 


42, 532. 95 


7,176.67 


6, 777. 77 


990, 301. 67 


939, 937. 36 


1, 144, 000. 00 


210, 840.41 



Digitized by 



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170 



RETORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XXIII.— Quantity and Cost op Silver used in the Coinage op 
RECAPITULATION. 



Months. 



Coined. 


Standard ounces. 


Cost. 


1,357,812.50 


$1,438,059.99 


2,234,375.00 


2,353,287.97 


2,221,484.37 


2,273,656.33 


2,105,468.75 


2,071,839.28 


2,164,873.05 


2,110,908.83 


2,221,484.37 


2,149,508.44 


2,178,515.63 


2,074,861.16 


2,225,987.50 


2,091,668.67 


2,299,687.50 


2,127,763. 10 


2,222,343.75 


2,039,403.68 


2, 222,438.28 


2,016,902.97 


23,454,470.70 





August — 
September. 
October — 
November . 
December . 



January .. 
February. 
March .... 

April 

May 

Jnne 



Total. 



1890. 



1891. 



XXIV.— Quantity and Cost op Silver used in the Coinage op Silver Dol 

UNDER BOTH THE ACTS OF FeBR 



Months. 



COINED. 


WASTED AND SOLD IN SWEEPS. 


Standard ounces. 


Cost. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


1,076,562.50 


$1, 836, 606. 34 


3,865.15 


$3,522.30 


2,450, 937.50 


2,470,449.54 


1,274.68 


1,168.04 


2,621, 093.75 
2,887,500.00 
2, 959, 148. 67 


2,714,293.24 

2,900,477.35 

2,873,764.42 


5,024.05 


4,695.44 


68L94 


647.95 


3,050,064.52 

3, 080,859.37 
2,608,203.13 
2, 581, 839. 22 


2,950,367.16 

2, 966, 055. 74 
2,483,134.81 
2,429,786.23 


4,633.11 


4,568.08 


683.72 


649.64 


2, 299, 687. 50 
2,227,354.75 


2, 127, 763. 10 
2,044,164,97 


4,020.74 


3,686.05 


2,222,438.28 


2,016,902.97 


19,313.35 


17,891.92 


30,065,689.19 


29,813, 765.87 


39,496,74 


36,829.42 



1890. 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1891. 

January 

February 

March * 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



Digitized by 



Google 

























REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



171 



Silver Dollars, Wasted and Sold in Sweeps, etc. — Continued. 

RECAPITULATION. 



✓ 



WASTED AND SOLD IN 8WEEPS. 



Standard 

ounces. 



Cost. 



TOTAL EMPLOYMENT. 



Standard ounces. 



Cost. 



Dollars coined. 
Pieces. 



Seigniorage. 



4,020.7* 
19, 313. 35 



$3, 888. 46 



3,686.05 

17,891.92 



1, 357, 812.50 
2, 234, 375.00 
2,221, 484.37 
2,105, 468.75 
2,168,811.94 



2, 221,484.37 

2. 178.515.63 
2, 225, 987. 50 
2, 303,708.24 
2, 222, 343.75 

2.241.751.63 



$1,438,059.99 
2,353,287.97 
2, 273, 656.33 

2. 071. 839. 28 

2. 114. 797. 29 



2,149,508.44 
2, 074, 861. 16 

2.091.668.67 
2,131,449. 15 

2.039.403.68 
2,034,794.89 



1.580.000 

2.600.000 

2.585.000 

2.450.000 
2,519,125 

2.585.000 

2. 535.000 
2,590,240 

2.676.000 

2.586.000 
2,586,110 



$141,940.01 

246. 712. 03 
311, 343. 67 
378, 160.72 
408,216.17 

435,491.56 

460,138.84 

498,571.33 

548,236.90 

546,596.32 

569.207.03 



27,272.98 



25,466.43 



23,481,743.68 



22,773,326.85 



27,292,475 



4, 544, 614.58 



lars, Wasted and Sold in Sweeps Monthly during the Fiscal Year 1891 , 
uary 28 , 1878 and July 14 , 1890 . 



BALANCE TRANSFERRED TO ACT 
OF 1890. 


TOTAL EMPLOYMENT. 


Dollars coined. 


Seignorage. 


Standard 

ounces. 


Cost. 


Standard ounces. 


C 08 t. 






1,980,427.65 


$1,840,128.72 


$2, 300,000 


$463,393.66 






2,452,212.18 

2,626,117.80 


2,471, 627.58 
2, 718, 988. 6$ 


2. 852. 000 

3.060.000 


381,550.46 
335, 706. 76 






2,887, 500.00 


2, 900,477.35 


3,360,000 


459,522.65 


.61 


$0.57 


2, 959, 830. 61 


2, 874,412.37 


3,443,373 


569, 608. 58 


.66 


.59 


3,054,697.63 

3,080,859.37 
2, 608, 886. 85 
2,581,839.22 
2, 303,708.24 


2,954,915.24 

2,966,055.74 
2,483,784.45 
2,429,786.23 
2, 131, 449. 15 


3, 549, 166 

3. 585.000 

3.035.000 
3,004,322 

2.676.000 


598, 798.84 

618,944.26 

551,865.19 

574,535.77 

548,236.90 


.01 


.58 


2,227,354.75 

2,241,751.63 


2,044,164.97 

2,034,794.89 


2,591,831 
2, 586, 110 


547.660.03 

569.207.03 


1.88 


L74 


81,005,185.93 


29,850,585.37 


36,032,802 


6,219,036.13 



Digitized by Google 
























172 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XXV. — Table showing the Number of Coins and Fineness of Each, from 
the Coinage of the Calendar Year 1890, assayed by the Annual Assay 
Commission, and Monthly by the Assayer of the Mint Bureau. 

Tablb a. —GOLD. 



























REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



173 



XXV. — COINS OF THE SEVERAL DEGREES OF FINENESS, IN PERCENTAGE OF THE 

whole Number of Coins assayed. 

Tablb c.— GOLD. 





Digitized by ^.ooQle 
































174 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT 



XXVI. — Imports and Exports of Gold and Silver during the fiscal Year 

1891 . 

[Prepared by the Bureau of Statistics, Treasury Department.] 

IMPORTS. 



Customs districts and ports. 


BULLION. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Total gold and 
silver Dullion. 


NEW YORK, N. Y. 








July, 1890 


$65,961 


$9,207 


$74,568 


August, 1890 


34, 141 


277,789 


311,930 


September, 1890 


54, 585 


397,155 


451, 740 


October, 1890 


45,695 


501,346 


•37, 041 


November, 1890 


31,719 


5,140 


36,859 


December, 1890 


170, 168 


650 


170,818 


January, 1891 


50,689 


46,435 


97, 124 


February, 1891 


48,176 


9,449 


57,625 


March, 1891 


34,479 


61,018 


95,497 


April, 1891 


22,918 


7,880 


30,798 


May, 1801 


30, 533 


64,379 


94,912 


June, 1891 


47,526 


2,741 


50,267 


Total 


635,990 


1,473,189 


2,109,179 


8AN FRANCISCO, CAL. 








July, 1890 


26,592 


161,880 


188,472 


August, 1890 


55, 481 


213, 781 


269,262 


September, 1890 


51,682 


200, 773 


252,455 


October, 1890 


54,641 


290,946 


345, 587 


November, 1890 


41,057 


232,681 


273,738 


December, 1890 


45,369 


313, 532 


358,901 


January, 1891 


37,738 


192,692 


230,430 


February, 1891 


16, 570 


207,003 


223,573 


March, 1891 


19,217 


207,206 


226,423 


April, 1891 


21,846 


213,456 


235,302 


May, i891 


23,920 


163, 598 


187,518 


June, 1891 


30,471 


164,030 


194,501 


Total * 


424,584 


2,561, 578 


2,986, 162 


ALL OTHER PORTS. 








July, 1890 


32,028 


141,968 


173,996 


August, 1890 


*98,887 


205,163 


304,050 


September, 1890 


83,725 


181,460 


265,185 


October, 1890 


86,786 


199,045 


285,831 


November. 1890 


105, 794 


205,269 


311,063 


December, 1890 


69, 152 


181,854 


251,006 


January, 1891 


116,207 


216,060 


332,276 


February, 1801 


84,074 


234,643 


318,717 


March, 1891 


89,427 


152,531 


241,958 


April, 1891 


78,524 


196,821 


275,345 


May, 1891 


90,655 


188,862 


279, 517 


June, 1891 


109,201 


183,525 


292,726 


Total 


1, 044,460 


2,287,210 


| 3,831,670 


Total imports (bullion) 


2,105,034 


6,321,977 j 8,427,011 



* Includes $528, bars, etc. 



Digitized by Google 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT, 



175 



XXVI.— Imports and Exports of Gold and Silver, etc.— Continued. 
IMPORTS — Continued. 



Porta. 



United 

States. 



Gold. 



Foreign. Total. 



United 

States. 



Silver. 



Foreign. 



Total. 



Total 
gold and 
silver 
coin. 



NEW YORK, N. Y. 



July, 1890 

August, 1890... 
September, 1890 
October, 1890. . . 
November, 1890 
December, 1890. 
January, 1891 . . 
February, 1891 . 
March, 1891 .... 

April, 1891 

May, 1891 

June, 1891 

Total.... 



$16,775 
405,003 
184,562 
60,053 
106,265 
, 322, 280 
334,781 
41,716 
194,063 
24,175 
32,444 
31,646 



|$1,045,266 $1,062,041 
1, 031,992 



333,992 
70,967 
643,945 
3,782, 888 
363, 793 
125,564 
235,476 
20, 670 
11,468 
48,654 



2,753,763 



7,309,672 



10, 063, 435 



BAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



July, 1890 

August, 1890. . . 
September, 1890 
October, 1890 . . . 
November, 1890 
December, 1890. 
January, 1891 . . 
February, 1891 . 
March, 1891.... 

April, 1891 

May, 1891 

June, 1891 



1,482 



11,430 
14, 141 
535 



2,560 



5,986 

4,792 



495,500 

705.656 
2, 289, 355 

977, 136 

623.656 
486,650 
248,604 

26, 508 
29,199 
10,300 



Total. 



40, 926 



5,892,564 



ALL OTHER PORTS. 

July, 1890 

August, 1890 

September, 1890 

October, 1890. 

. November, 1890 

December, 1890 

January, 1891 

February, 1881 

March, 1891 

April, 1891 

May, 1891 

June, 1891 



7,485 

8,564 



65 



11,300 

1,000 



8,650 
18, 500 
5,500 



600 



508 



15.000 

30.000 

8, 536 

14,900 



Total 

Total imports (coin) . 



29, 457 



101, 151 



2, 824, 146 



13, 303, 387 



518,554 
131, 020 
750, 210 
5, 105, 168 
698, 574 
167,280 
429,539 
44,845 
43,912 



$9,937 
51,814 
139, 875 
22,799 
19, 311 
23,594 
7,964 
8,031 
2,543 
9,557 
2,775 
7,010 



$175,206 
368,478 
738, 172 
380, 315 
290,954 
349,034 
219, 190 
30,070 
120,639 
35,837 
138, 400 
78,586 



$185,143 
420,292 
878, 047 
403, 114 
310,265 
372,628 
227,154 
38,101 
123, 182 
45,394 
141,175 
85,596 



|$1, 247, 184 
1, 452, 284 
1, 396, 601 
534,134 
1,060,475 
5,477,796 
925,728 
205,381 
552,721 
90, 239 
185,087 
165,896 



305, 210 



2, 924, 881 



3, 230, 091 



13, 293, 526 



1, 482 
495,500 
717, 086 
2, 303, 496 
977, 671 
623,656 
489,210 
248, 604 
26, 508 
35,185 
15,092 



5, 933,490 



7, 550 
8,564 



19,950 
19,500 
. 5,500 
600 

15.000 

30.000 
8,536 

15,408 



130, 608 



16, 127, 533 



12,000 



50,245 
143,304 
200, 926 
372, 984 
73, 831 
72,845 
19,922 
35,840 
21,288 
11,627 
17,060 
41,005 



50,245 
143,304 
200,926 
372, 984 
73, 831 
72,845 
31,922 
35,840 
21,288 
11,627 
17,060 
41, 005 



51,727 
638,804 
918, 012 
2,676,480 
1, 051, 502 
696,501 
521, 132 
284,444 
47,796 
46, 812 
32, 152 
41, 005 



12,000 



1, 060, 877 



1, 072, 877 



7, 006, 367 



427 



1,637 

700 



4,409 

607 

250 



737,535 
612, 189 
540,080 
785,347 
770,904 
943,900 
602,744 
451,230 
484,443 
351,366 
565,655 
548,512 



737, 535 
612,616 
540,080 
785,347 
770, 904 
943,900 
604, 381 
451, 930 
484,443 
355,775 
566,262 
548,762 



745, 085 
621, 180 
540, 080 
785,347 
790,854 
963,400 
609,881 
452, 530 
499,443 
385,775 
574, 798 
564, 170 



8, 030 



7,393,905 



7,401,935 



7, 532, 543 



325,240 



11, 379, 663 



11,704,903 127,832,436 



Digitized by 



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176 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XX VM» — Imports and Exports of Gold and Silver, etc. — Continued. 
DOMESTIC EXPORTS. 



Ports. 


BULLION. 


Total gold 
and silver 
bullion. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


U. S. mint 
or assay 
office bars. 


Other 

bullion. 


Total. 


IT. S. mint 
or assay 
office bars. 


Other 

bullion. 


Total. 


NEW TORE, N. T. 
July, 1890 


$10, 181, 359 
1, 763, 968 


$1, 010, 931 
16, 415 
14,686 
50,843 
14,809 
39, 806 
35, 402 
617,827 
116,912 
32,740 
115,405 
36,956 


$11, 192, 290 
1,780,383 
14,686 
50,843 
17,034 
39,806 
35,402 
3,012,204 
719, 912 
32,740 
289, 178 
36,956 


$55,000 

57,000 

114,856 


$2, 188,641 
823,630 
2, 055,250 
182,750 
1, 295, 904 
1,097,254 
941,900 
1,003,202 
1, 265, 349 
1, 159, 145 
100, 196 
* 642,251 


$2,243,641 
880,630 
2, 170, 106 
182,750 
1, 295,904 
1, 145, 254 
941,900 
1, 003, 202 
1, 316, 149 
1, 259, 145 
100, 196 
862,664 


$13, 435, 931 
2, 661, 013 
2, 184, 792 
233,593 
1, 312, 938 

1.185.060 
977, 302 

4, 015, 406 

2. 036. 061 
1,291,885 

389,374 

899,620 












2, 225 






48,000 








2, 394, 377 
603,000 




March, 1891 


50,800 

100,000 


April, 1891 


May, 1891 


173, 773 


June, 1891 


220, 413 


Total 




15, 118, 702 


2, 102, 732 


17, 221, 434 


646,069 


12, 755, 472 


13,401, 541 


30, 622, 975 


SAN FBANCI80O, CAL. 




839 

2,425 

3,080 

540 

955 

3,850 

876 


839 

2,425 

3,080 

540 

955 

3,850 

876 








839 
2,425 
3,080 
540 
48, 955 
3,850 
876 

































November 1890 






48,000 


48,000 


December 1890 






January, 1891 










February, 1891 











March 1891 




320 


320 




183,400 
140, 450 
24,000 


183,400 

140,450 

24,000 


183, 720 
140,450 
24, 160 
172 


April 1891 






May 1891 





160 

172 


160 

172 




.Tijnfl 1891 


1 




Total 












13, 217 


13, 217 




395, 850 


395, 850 


409,067 


ALL OTHER PORTS. 

July 1890 






! 














A n glint., 1890 
















September, 1890 ...... 
















October, 1890 
















November, 1890 










: 






December, 1890 
















January, 1891 
















February, 1891 
















March, 1891 
















April, 1891 
















May, 1891 


! 






'1 








June, 1891 




j 








Total domestic 
exports (bul- 
lion) 













15,118,702 


2, 115, 949 


17,234, 651 


646,069 


13, 151,322 


13, 797, 391 

1 


31,032,042 





Digitized by ^.ooQle 



REPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OP THE MINT. 



177 



XXVI* — Imports and Exports of Gold and Shark, ktc. — Coutiuued. 
DOMESTIC EXPORTS — Continued. 



Ports. 



NEW YORK, N. Y. 



July, 1890 

August, 1890 

September, 1890 . 
October, 1890. . . . 
November, 1890 . 
December. 1890 . 
January, 1891 
February, 1891 . . 

March, 1891 

April, 1891 

May, 1891 

June, 1891 



Total . 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



July, 1890 

August, 1890 

September, 1890. 

October, 1890 

November, 1890 . 
December, 1890. . 
January, 1891 . . . 
February, 1891 . . 

March, 1891 

April, 1891 

May, 1891 

June, 1891 

Total 



ALL OTHER PORTS. 



July, 1890 

August, 1890. . . 
September, 1890 
October, 1890 . . . 
November, 1890 
December, 1890 
January, 1891 . . 
February, 1891 . 

March, 1891 

April, 1891 

May, 1891 

June, 1891 



Total : 

Total domestic exports, coin . 



COIN. 


! Gold. 


Silver. 


Total. 


$371, 230 




$371,236 


133, 479 




133, 479 


162, 327 


$1, 043 


163, 370 


207,825 


400 


208, 225 


352,530 


16,800 


369, 330 


339, 961 




339, 961 


256, 975 


20, 930 


277, 905 


446, 836 


21,500 


468, 336 


4, 109, 145 




4, 109, 145 


13, 947, 276 




13, 947, 276 


29, 604, 527 




29, 604, 527 


14, 875, 032 


2,200 


14,877,232 


64, 807, 149 


62, 873 


64, 870, 022 


91,870 


1,000 


92, 870 


100,566 




100,560 


99, 795 




99, 795 


159, 814 




159, 814 


171, 026 




171, 026 


233, 033 


1,150 


234, 183 


176, 602 




176, 602 


98, 628 


3, 272 


101,900 


72, 843 




72,843 


158, 100 


2, 948 


161, 048 


122,895 i 




122,8$> 


147,729 ! 




147, 729 


1,632.901 , 


8, 370 


1,641,271 




3,038 i 


3, 638 




2, 177 


2, 177 


750' 


19, 099 


19, 849 




26, 985 


20, 985 


i • j 


4,995 


4,995 


1 ; 


16.598 1 


17,318 


! 750 1 


15, 947 


16, 697 


2,800 1 


14, 208 


17, 008 


1,000 


5, 521 


6, 521 


5,000 


15,394 


20, 394 


502,600 


13,909 


516, 509 


751,200 


26, 609 


777, 809 


1,264,850 


165, 080 


1, 429, 930 


j 67, 704^900 


236, 323 


67, 941, 223 



10285 M 12 



Digitized by 



Google 




/ 



178 EEPOET OF THE DIEECTOE OF THE MINT. 

XXVI. — Imports and Exports of Gold and Silver, etc. — Continued. 
FOREIGN EXPORTS. 



Ports. 


BULLION. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Total. 


NEW YORK, N. Y, 

-Tnlv 1800 




















October, 1890 i 


i 


















$11. 770 






$11, 770 






March, 1891 




$29, 914 


29, 914 


April, 1891 




May, 1891 
















Total 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

July, 1890 








11,770 


29,914 


41, 684 


i 






I ! 




i t 




' - 




! 






i 






i 


















April, 1891 








May, 1891 
















Total 














ALL OTHER PORTS. 

July, 1890 


' 










August, 1890 








September, 1890 








October, 1890 








November, 1890 * 








December, 1890 


: 1 




.Tannarv. 1891 









February, 1891 ^ 






March, 1891 1 






Anril. 1891 1 







May, 1891 








June, 1891 









Total 














Total foreign exports (bullion) 








11,770 


29, 914 


41,684 





Digitized by Google 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



179 



XXVI. — Imports and Exports of Gold and Silver, etc. — C ontinued. 
FOREIGN EXPORTS-Continued. 



Ports. 


COIN. 


Gold.' 


Silver. 


Total. 


NEW YORK, N. Y. 








July, 1890 


$203, 794 


$185, 000 


$388,794 


August, 1890 


119,000 


622,529 


741,529 


September, 1890 


989 


86,676 


87,665 


October, 1890 


6,213 


14,578 


20, 791 


November, 1890 


25, 607 


219,310 


244,917 


December, 1890 


14,954 


508,720 


523, 674 


January, 1891 


245,871 


323,063 


568,934 


February, 1891 


449, 678 


296, 158 


745, 836 


March, 1891 


252, 516 


228, 691 


481,207 


April, 1891 


20,000 


241,763 


261, 763 


May, 1891 


61,400 


355,077 


416, 477 


June, 1891 


11,311 


147, 497 


158,808 


Total 


1,411,333 j 

- 


3, 229,062 


4, 640, 395 


SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 








July, 1890 




344 054 


344 054 


August, 1890 








September, 1890 




321 866 




October, 1890 




'CIA 97ft 




November, 1890 




RAO 917 


500 217 


December, 1890 




1 1W 855 


1 1R7 ARK 


January, 1 891 




297 373 




February, 1891 




282 896 


2R2 


March, 1891 




303 983 


303 083 


April, 1891 1 




43A 518 


UVUj 1700 

130 51ft 


May, 1891 




tvvj vAQ 
222,860 


tOv, JIO 

222 RAO 


June, 1891 




510, 536 


Ovv 

510 538 


Total 




5 205 151 


diU) you 

5 205 151 


ALL OTHER PORTS. 




WV f IvA 


lit 4fUy ? io± 


July, 1890 




25,014 


25 014 


August, 1890 




18,874 
4, 548 


18, 874 


September, 1890 




4, 548 


October, 1890 




10, 086 


10 086 


November, 1890 








December, 1890 




5,892 
19, 251 


5,892 
19 251 


January, 1891 




February, 1891 




1,800 


1 800 


March, 1891 


j 


3,582 

2,400 


8, 582 


April, 1891 


I . .. 


2, 400 










May, 1891 




1, 700 


1,700 


Jnna. 1891 






Total 1 1 


93, 147 


i 93 f X47 


Total foreign exports (coin) 


1,411,333 


8,527, 360 


9, 938, 693 



Digitized by Google 



180 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XXVI* — 1MPOHT8 AND EXPORTS OF GOLD AND SILVER, ETC. — Coiltiliucd. 



REC APIT ELATION. 



Description. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Total. 


IMPORTS. 

Bullion 

Foreign coin 


$2, 105,034 
13, 303, 387 


$6,321,977 
11, 379, 663 


$8, 427, Oil 
24, 683,050 


Total 

United States coin 


15, 408, 421 
2, 824, 146 


17,701,640 
325, 240 


33,110,061 
3, 140, 386 


Total bullion and coin 


18, 232, 567 


18, 026,880 


36, 250, 447 


EXPORTS. 

Domestic bullion 

Foreign bullion 

Foreign coin 


17, 234, 651 
11, 770 
1, 411, 333 


13, 797, 391 
29, 914 
8, 527, 360 


31,032,042 
41,684 
0, 938, 603 


Total 

United States coin 


18, 657, 754 
67, 704, 900 


22, 354, 665 
236, 323 


41,012,410 
67, 041, 223 


Total bullion and coin 


86, 362, 654 


22,590,088 


108, 953, 642 


EXCESS. 

Bullion and foreign coin : 

Exports 

United States coin : 

Imports 

Exports 


3,249,333 
64, 880, 754 


4, 653,025 
88,917 


7, 902,358 
64, 791, 837 



XXVII.— Values of Gold and Silver Ores Imported into and Exported 
from the United States During the Fiscal Year 1891. 



imports. 



Months. 


NEW YORK. 


SAN FRANCISCO. 


PASO DEL NORTE, 
TEX. 


ALL OTHER CUS- 
TOMS DISTRICTS. 




Gold. 


Silver. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


July, 1800 


$30 


$5, 513 
16, 774 





$17,267 

12,407 




$375,540 
346, 003 


$12, 156 
19, 443 


$281,844 
317, 964 


September, 1890 

October, 1890 : . . 


369 


15,604 




49, 930 




451, 955 


24, 521 


414,348 




6,860 




39, 363 




431,997 


14, 856 


279, 094 


November, 1890 




5, 723 




28, 235 




285,456 


15, 558 


235, 245 


December, 1800 




25, 704 




72, 482 




296, 267 


11,040 


209, 651 


January, 1891 




24, 513 





30, 205 




370, 846 


3, 420 


171, 424 


February, 1891 

March, 1891 




84, 253 




57, 878 




382, 394 


7, 143 


231, 909 


15 


66,621 




25, 998 


$601 


390, 203 


5,700 j 


286, 297 


April, 1891 

May, 1891 

June, 1891 


750 


19, 764 




35, 027 


3,960 


301,222 


16,269 ! 


356, 070 


532 


20,027 




78, 765 


19, 876 1 


421,367 


23,679 1 


409, 313 


1,026 


43, 401 




63, 513 


14,374 


435, 165 


19,485 


426, 237 


Total 


2,722 


334,727 




511, 070 


38, 811 


|4, 488, 415 


173, 270 


3, 619,396 



Total imports of gold ores, $214,803 ; silver ores, $8,953,608. 



Digitized by LaOOQle 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 181 



3KXTII* — Values of Gold and Silver Ores Imported into and Exported 
from the United States During the Fiscal Year 1S91 — Continued. 

EXPORTS. 



Months. 


DOMESTIC EXPORTS. 


FOREIGN EXPORTS. 


Gold and silver bearing ores. 


New York. 


All other districts. 


Baltimore. 


New 

York. 


All other 
districts. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


i 

.Tulv lftftft 


$20,640 






$845, 


$34 


$506 










1,259 


* 1 


















67 






2,000 




1,358 




$5 








1,557 




2, 275 




1,000 






2,200 




3, 457 




225 






1,200 




5,095 




90 








24,222 


175 


19,686 


February, 1891 












10,226 






2, 050 




i i 


*3, '200 




6,965 


April, 1891 




4, 565 




I 




7, 193 






3,000 










10,931 






2,900 


























Total 


95 


34,447 






35,224 


209 


68,951 















Total exports of ^old and silver bearing ores (domestic), $34,542. 
Total exports of foreign gold ores, $209; silver ores, $104,175. 



Digitized by ^.ooQie 




182 REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

XXVIII.— Statement, by Countries, of the Imports of Gold and Silver 



Countries from which imported. 


GOLD. 


Ore. 


Bullion. 


Coin. 


United 

States. 


Foreign. 


Brasil 




$1,691 

1,200 


$691 

47,459 


Central American States : 




$7,763 
3,782 
144 
69, 769 









$350 

7,104 






Nicaragua 


22, 170 
10,430 


1,000 




Chili 








China 






832 
439, 243 
650 
73,890 




Colombia . 


1,791 


324, 010 
2,250 


63,574 




Danish West Indies 




22,866 
472, 850 
8,389 
1,410,385 
2, 447, 901 


France 






French possessions, all other (in America) 








Germany 




24 

145,995 


1, 348, 403 


Great Britain and Ireland 




Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island 
Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, and the Northwest Territory . 
British Columbia 


30 

690 




*2, 188 
399,472 
11,940 
46,584 










British West Indies 




237,807 

5,669 


60,916 


British Honduras 




British Africa 




4,557 
5, 851, 526 


British Australasia 






2, 141 
1,000 
16,670 


Hawaian Islands 




50 


Hayti 






Japan 






10,300 

154,592 


Mexico 


204,356 

I 


1,073,243 


29,515 

3,620 

22,805 


Netherlands 


Dutch West Indies 






31,425 


Dutch Guiana 


482 


3,390 


Portugal 






Azores, Madeira, and Cape Verde Islands 


{ 




41,686 
20,708 
527,546 
8,350 
8, 120 


515 
328,208 
2,375, 133 

11,100 


San Domingo 


j 


300 

12,580 


Cuba 




Puerto Rico Island 




Venezuela 




1,550 


Total 






214, 803 


2,105,034 


2, 824, 146 


13,303,387 





* Including $528, bars, etc. 



t 

\ 



Digitized by Google 




183 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 
into the United States during the fiscal Year 1891. 



Ore. 



Bullion. 



Coin. 



United States. 



Foreign. 



Total including ores. 



$ 3,994 



4,236 
2, 395 



8,861 



219,096 
35 , 374 



8 , 679,845 j 



8 , 953, 608 



$ 53, 603 
8,764 



171, 360 



838, 992 
388,304 



872 
2, 958 



3, 380 
8, 173 



*1 



4 , 848, 771 



1,800 



6 , 321, 977 



$111 

7,390 



1,000 



98,416 
250 
8, 053 



5, 453 



2,282 



125,006 | 

2,000 i 



12,000 

9,000 



3,392 
28 , 923 



1,634 
13, 420 
6,804 



156 



325, 240 



$568 

13, 101 
213,597 
119.059 
23, 688 
56, 956 



78 

1 , 647, 060 



38,752 



32,850 

3,456 

10,000 



45, 346 
388 , 663 
1,120 
32,034 
1,470 
1,510 
8, 014 
8 , 187:918 



85,964 
650 
1,800 
3, 195 
62, 074 
145, 787 
276,958 



11 , 379,663 



$ 3,061 

76,913 
270, 982 
332, 311 
324, 726 
71,622 
2, 395 
910 

2 , 754,315 
3,150 
143, 561 
472, 850 
41,239 
3 , 604, 713 
2 , 902, 200 
30 

225, 078 
437, 604 
481,015 
446,206 
5, 677 
5 , 868, 874 
14,520 
27, 180 
18, 314 
23 , 181, 632 
3,620 
169, 117 
4,522 
1,800 
47,030 
424, 710 
3 , 069, 650 
296,408 
9,833 



45 , 427, 858 



Digitized by v^.ooQLe 



184 



REPORT OF THE DIREC TOR OF THE MINT. 



XXIX. — Statement, by Countries, of the Exports of Domestic 



> 



Countries to which exported. 


GOLD. 


Bullion. 


Coin. 


U. S. Mint or as- 
say office bars. 


Other bullion. 








$6,326 

18,387 
68,699 
5,000 
9, 250 
4,848 
121,849 
14,450,005 
10,000 
12,429,500 
35, 285, 950 
1,200 


Central American States : 
































Colombia 






France 


$173, 773 


$35, 237 




Germany 


3, 497, 377 
11,447,552 


003, 500 
1,453, 995 


Great Britian and Ireland 


Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, and the Northwest 
Territory. 

British Columbia 






British West, Indies . 




10, 000 


20, 100 








10,250 
559, 585 
925. 120 
1,368. 175 

33. 000 
56,699 

15. 000 
13, 864 

630, 200 
1, 661, 893 




13, 217 


Hawaiian Islands 


Hay ti 1 




Japan 




Mexico \ 




Peru ' 












Venezuela ! 




Total 






15,118, 702 


2, 115,949 


67, 704, 900 



XXX. — Statement, by Countries, of the Exports of Foreign 



Countries to which exported. 


GOLD. 


Ore. j Bullion. 


Coin. 




, 








$i.3, 098 
487 | 


Central American States : 


1 




i 


Honduras 


1 


1,500 j 




1 


Salvador 

China 

Colombia 

France .* 

Germany 

Great Britain and Ireland j 

British West Indies 

British East Indies 

British Possessions in Australasia. 

Hong-Kong 

Havli 


l - ! 

! 98 i 

:::::::::::::: 

$2.J9 $11,770 1 11,311 | 

! i 1 

* i ! 


Japan 




Mexico 




2,465 


Dutch West Indies 




Peru 




5,000 
1,300 
1,027, 196 
989 
327, 889 


Santo Domingo 




Cuba 


i 


Puerto Rico 


1 


Venezuela 




Total 




209 i 11,770 


1, 411, 333 





Digitized by U.ooQLe 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 185 



Gold and Silver during the Fiscal Year 1891. 



SILVER. 






Bullion. 




Total, including ores. 


ver bearing. 


U. S. Mint or assay 
office bars. 


Other bullion. 


Coin. 








$562,809 




$569,135 










18,387 








$6,220 


74, 919 










5,000 










9,250 












4, 848 








4,828 


126, 677 







116, 334 




14,775, 349 










10, 000 


$9, 165 
25, 355 


$646,069 


12, 076, 329 


9, 800 
8,747 


16, 539, 542 
60, 945, 050 
9, 947 








137, 515 


137,515 








1,500 


31,600 








2,200 


2, 200 






298, 850 




309, 100 










572, 802 








2, 150 


927, 270 


22 




97,000 


7,000 


1, 375, 197 
130, 000 








54,890 


111, 589 










15,000 










13,864 








1,395 


631, 595 








78 


3,661,971 












34, 542 


| 646,069 


13, 151, 322 


236,323 


99, 007, 807 



Gold and Silver during the Fiscal Year 1891. 



SILVER. 




Ore. 


Bullion. 

. .. 


Coin. 




$3, 605 




$8,476 


$3,605 
21, 574 








487 






147, 231 


147,231 







35,465 


36,965 






28,285 


28,285 






80, 415 


80, 415 






38 000 


38,000 






40 229 


40, 327 


738 

83,946 

15,886 


29, 914 


* 283 , 350 

910 
2, 304,598 
25, 009 


284, 088 
84,856 
2,373,688 
45, 009 


1 




280’ 000 


280,000 






3, 775 


3, 775 






4, 036, 274 


4, 036, 274 






2, 874 


2, 874 






8 )5, 000 


805,000 


1 





113, 680 


116, 145 


1 




131 


131 






2, 320 


7, 320 


1 




62, 430 


63, 730 


I 


1 


224,067 


1,251,263 








989 






4, 841 


332, 73(1 










104, 175 


29,914 ! 

1 


8, 527, 360 


10, 084, 761 



I 



Digitized by CjOOQle 





18G REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

XXXI.— ■ Comparison op the Business of the Mints and Assay Offices fob 
the Fiscal Years 1890 and 1891. 

DEPOSITS, BARS MANUFACTURED, AND COINAGE. 











BASS MANUFACTURED. 




Institutions. 


unrusna. 


Gold. 


Silver. 




1890. 


1891. 


1890. 


1891. 


1890. | 


1891. 


Philadelphia 

San Francisco . . . 


$22, 228, 846. 51 
24, 936,067. 79 
3,485, 645. 18 
10,985,542.48 
1,325,344.66 


$57, 951, 960. 52 
31, 759, 564. 66 
4, 051, 504. 17 
13, 120, 547. 56 
1, 203, 614. 89 


$750, 131. 04 


$1,144,235.22 


$146,086.37 

170,815.73 


$28,348.67 
258,816.55 
1 616,479.45 

1 


New Orleans ..... 


253.45 


221.47 




Denver 


1,304,887.09 


1, 183, 708. 35 


20,457.57 


19,906.54 


New York 


27,494,239.86 


32, 786, 420. 78 


19,008,325.04 


26, 508, 686. 57 


6,648,562.62 


7,460,576.80 


Bois6 


607, 669. 60 


698, 596. 06 


591, 958. 16 


678,727.24 


15,711.44 j 


19, 868. 83 


Helena 


1,188, 182.00 


968, 906. 10 


1, 153, 393. 66 


948, 786. 14 


34,788.34 


20,119.94 


Charlotte 


196, 136.99 


234, 276. 39 


194, 996. 44 


233, 205. 76 


1, 140. 55 


1,070.63 


St. Louis 


346, 283. 64 


480, 441. 26 


338, 488. 46 


467, 971. 02 


7,795.18 


12,470.24 


Total 


92, 793, 958. 71 


143,255,832.39 


23, 342, 433. 34 


31, 165, 541. 77 


7, 045, 357. 80 


8, 437, 657. 65 



Coinage mints. 


GOLD COINAGE. 


1890. | 


1891. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


Philadelphia 

San Francisco 

Carson 

New Orleans 


177, 397 
987, 350 
92, 460 


$2, 209, 548. 50 
17, 963, 000. 00 
1, 849, 200. 00 


65,428 
1,073,000 
275, 726 

1 


$537, 002. 5dy 
21,460, 000.00 
2, 175, 200. 00 


Total 




I 





1,257,207 


22,021,748.50 


1,414,154 


21, 172, 202. 50 


Coinage mints. 


SILVER COINAGE. 


1890. | 1891. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


Philadelphia 

San Francisco 

Carson 

New Orleans 

Total 


26, 862, 961 
5, 548, 124 
1, 438, 000 
10,925,000 , 


$19, 758, 024. 30 
4, 694, 812. 40 
1, 438, 000. 00 
10, 925, 000. 00 


31, 343, 654 
11,469, 565 
2, 109, 041 
9, 870, 913 


$16, 729, 774. 15 
9, 562, 292. 20 
2, 109, 041. 00 
9, 870, 913. 00 


44,774,085 


36, 815, 836. 70 


54, 793, 173 


38, 272, 020. 35 


Coinage mints. 


| MINOR COINAGE. 


1890. 


1891. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


Philadelphia 

San Francisco 


66, 666, 779 


$1,416, 851.73 


63, 340, 550 


$1, 166, 936. 50 


Carson 










New Orleans - 










Total 








1 


66, 666, 779 


1, 416, 851. 73 


63,340,550 


1, 166, 936. 50 



Digitized by Google 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



187 



XXXI.— ‘ Comparison of the Business of the Mints anj> Assay Offices, 

etc. — Continued. 

DEPOSITS, BARS MANUFACTURED, AND COINAGE— Continued. 



Coinage mints. 


TOTAL COINAGE. 


1890. 


1891. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


Philadelphia 


93, 707, 137 


$23, 384,424.53 


94, 749, 632 


$18, 433,713.15 


San Francisco 


6, 535, 474 


22, 657, 812. 40 


12, 542, 565 


31,022, 292.20 


Carson 


1, 530, 460 


3, 287, 200. 00 


2,384,767 


4, 284, 241. 00 


New Orleans 


10, 925,000 


10, 925, 000. 00 


», 870, 913 


9, 870, 913. 00 


Total 


112, 698, 071 


60,254,436.93 


119,547,877 


63, 611, 159. 35 



BULLION OPERATIONS AND WASTAGE. 



Institutions. 


GOLD BULLION RECEIVED BY MELTER 
AND REFINER. 


SILVER BULLION RECEIVED BY MELTER 
AND REFINER. 


1890. 


1891. 


1890. 


1891. 


Philadelphia 

San Francisco 

Carson 

New Orleans 

New York 


Standard ozm . 
864, 019 
' 2, 064, 228 
275, 708 
40,040 
1,049,624 


Standard ozm . 
824, 873 
2,267, 141 
276, 851 
45, 105 
686,101 


Standard qzm . 
37, 429,806 
9,558,586 
2, 880,261 
19, 239, 543 
5, 964,068 


Standard ozm . 
35, 390, 724 
15, 929, 999 
3,966, 587 
' 17,642,783 

3,472,898 



Institutions. 


GOLD BULLION RECEIVED BY COINER. SILVER BULLION RECEIVED BY COINER. 


1890. 


1891. 


1890. 


1891. 


Philadelphia 

San Francisco 

Carson 


Standard ozm . 
285,599 
2, 043, 040 
192, 722 


Standard ozm . 
67, 560, 768 
2, 289, 359 
230, 402 


Standard ozm . 
35, 425, 055 
8, 644,912 
2,422,845 
18, 800, 244 


Standard ozm . 
31, 108, 225 
16, 205, 310 
3, 228, 681 
17, 382,500 








Institutions. 


GOLD WA8TAGE OF MELTER AND 
REFINER. 


SILVER WASTAGE OF MELTER AND 
REFINER. 


1890. 


1891. 


1890. 


1891. 


Philadelphia 


Standard ozm . 


Standard ozm . 


[Standard ozm . 


Standard ozm . 


San Francisco 










Carson 








3,458 


New Orleans 








New York 




















Institutions. 


GOLD WASTAGE OF COINER. 


SILVER WASTAGE OF COINER. 


| 1890. 


1891. 


1890. 


1891. 


Philadelphia 

San Francisco 

Carson 

New Orleans 


j Standard ozm . 
j 11 

52 
6 


Standard ozm . 

2 

48 

10 


Standard ozm . 

4,554 
1,602 
374 
3, 322 


Standard ozm . 

2,747 
2,619 
435 
3, 027 






! 



Digitized by Google 









1X8 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XXXII* — Unrefined Gold and Silver of Domestic Production, its Distri- 
bution by States and Territories, also Refined Domestic Bullion (not 
distributed), Deposited at the Mints and Assay Offices, from their Or- 
ganization TO THE CLOSE OF THE FISCAL YEAR, 1891. 



Locality. 


Gold. 

i 


Silver. 


Total. 


Alabama 


$235, 334. 83 


$134.08 


$235, 468. 91 


.Alaska 


810,105. 37 


7, 578. 30 


817, 683.67 


Arizona 


5, 361,963.00 


13, 857, 358. 04 


19, 219,321.04 


Cali t'oi'ii ia 


757, 713, 300. 94 


4, 097, 079. 65 


761,810, 380.59 


( tolorado 


60, 140, 436. 68 


24, 467, 565. 29 


84,608, 001.97 


Georgia 


8, 895, 835.72 


5, 393. 39 


8, 901,229.11 


Idaho ' 


32, 597, 083. 87 


1, 889, 772. 19 


34, 486, 856. 06 


Indiana ■ 


40. 13 




40. 13 


Maine 


5, 638. 20 


22. 00 


5, 660. 20 


Maryland 


18, 288. 28 


36.86 


18, 325. 14 







917.56 


917. 56 


Michigan 


274, 407. 24 


3, 889, 408. 06 


4, 163, 815. 30 


Montana 


67, 118, 541. 81 


16, 556, 225. 39 


83,074, 767.20 


Nebraska 


2, 078. 76 


22.84 


2, 101. 60 


Nevada 


29, 883, 948. 37 


100,279, 775.49 


130, 163, 723. 86 


New Hampshire 


11,501.89 


1.74 


11, 503. 63 


New Mexico 


4,595, 031.94 


6, 676, 169. 03 


11,271,200. 97 


North Carolina 


11,604, 867. 79 


57, 874. 36 


11, 662, 742. 15 


Oregon 


20, 593, 009. 80 


80,324.72 


20, 673, 334. 58 


Pennsylvania 


1,138.34 


2,588.47 


3, 726. 81 


South Carolina 


1,908,676.79 


2, 668. 51 


1, 911,345.30 


South Dakota 


39, 423, 766. 21 


917, 262. 60 


40, 341,028.81 


Tennessee 


89, 747. 45 


12.27 


89, 759. 72 


Texas 


3, 626. 02 


5, 526. 83 


9, 152.85 


Utah 


1, 142, 713. 54 


19, 576, 538. 48 


20, 719, 252. 02 


Vermont 


85, 598. 21 


49.94 


85,648.15 


Virginia 


1,743, 100.86 


392.40 


1,743,493.26 


Washington 


627, 178. 16 


6,671.77 


633, 819. 93 


Wyoming 


808, 660. 48 


12, 860. 30 


821, 520. 78 


Other sources or localities not reported 


40, 938, 815. 41 


42, 685, 179. 70 


83, 623, 995. 11 


Total unretined 


1, 086, 634, 436. 15 


235,075,410.26 : 


1,321,709,816. 41 


Refined bullion 


373, 851, 817. 32 


367, 498, 914. 54 


741,350, 731.86 


Total 


1, 460, 486, 253. 47 


602, 574, 324. 80 


2, 063, 060, 578. 27 



Digitized by CaOOQle 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



189 



XXXIII.— Price of Silver in London per Ounce, British Standard, (. 925 ,) 
SINCE 1833 , AND THE EQUIVALENT IN UNITED STATES GOLD COIN OF AN OUNCE 
1,000 FINE, TAKEN AT THE AVERAGE PRICE. 



Calendar 

year. 


Lowest 

quota- 

tion. 


Highest 

quota- 

tion. 


Aver- 

age 

quota- 

tion. 


Value 
of a fine 
ounce at 
average 
quotation. 


Calendar 

year. 


Lowest 

quota- 

tion. 


Highest 

quota- 

tion. 


Aver- 

age 

quota- 

tion. 


Value 
of a fine 
ounce at 
average 
quotation. 




d. 


d. 


d. 


Dollars. 


1 


d. 


d. 


d. 


Dollars. 


1833 


58| 


59| 


59 * 


1. 297 1862 


61 


622 


61* 


1. 346 


1834 


59$ 


602 


59H 


1.313 


! 1863 


61 


61| 


61f 


1.345 


1835 


592 


60 


mh 


1. 308 


i 1864 

| 


60| 


622 


61! 


1. 345 


1830 


59§ 


m 


60 


1. 315 


(1865 


602 


61! 


61* 


1.338 


1837 


59 


60§ 


59* 


1.305 


1866 


602 


622 


612 


1.339 


1838 


59* 


602 


59* 


1. 304 


1867 


60f 


612 


60* 


1. 328 


1839 


60 


602 


«o§ 


1.323 


: 1868 


602 


612 


602 


1.326 


1840 


602 


602 


60§ 


1.323 


i 1869 


60 


61 


60* 


1.325 


1841 


592 


60§ 


60* 


1. 316 


| 1870 


602 


602 


60* 


1.328 


1842 


592 


60 


59* 


1.303 


| 1871 


60* 


61 


602 


1. 326 


1843 


59 


59§ 


59* 


1.297 


1 1872 


592 


612 


60* 


1. 322 


1844 


592 


592 


592 


1.304 


1873 


57| 


59}i 


592 


1. 298 


1845 


58| 


1 592 


592 


1. 298 


j 1874 


572 


592 


58* 


1. 278 


1846 


59 


602 


59* 


1.30 


| 1875 


552 


! 57| 


562 


1.246 


1847 


58J 


60f 


5922 


1. 308 


i 1876 


462 


i 582 


522 


I 1.156 


1848 


582 


60 


592 


1. 304 


1877 


532 


582 


541! 


1.201 


1849 


592 


60 


592 


1. 309 


1 1878 


492 


iK>2 


52* 


1. 152 


1850 ! 


1 592 


612 


61* 


1. 316 


j 1879 


482 


532 


5i£ 


1. 123 


1851 1 


| 60 


61| 


61 


1.337 | 


I 1880 


51| 


522 


522 


1. 145 


1852 1 


59J 


612 


602 


1.326 


1881 


| 502 


522 


• 511! 


1. 138 


1853 


60$ 


612 


612 


1. 348 j 


[ 1882 


50 


52! 


5112 


1. 136 


3854 


60J 


612 


612 


1.348 ! 


, 1883 


50— 


, 51 * 


50! 


1. 11 


1855 


60 


61| 


61* 


1.344 | 


1884 


492 


51 1 


502 


1. 113 


1856 


602 


622 


61* 


1.344 


, 1885 


462 | 


50 


48* 


1. 0645 


1857 


61 


622 


612 


1. 353 


1886 


42 


47 


45! 


0.9946 


1858 


0O| 


61J 


61* 


1. 344 


i 1887 . 


4:*2 i 


472 


44f 


0. 97823 


1859 


612 


62| 


! 62* 


1. 36 


! 1888 


41& 


| 44* 


422 


0. 93987 


I860 


012 


62g 


61 R 


1. 352 | 


1 1889 


42 | 


1 44! 


42R 


0. 93576 


1861 


602 


612 


| 60Jg 


1. 333 jj 1890 


43| | 


j 54| 


472 | 


1. 04633 



Digitized by U.ooQLe 




190 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XXXIV. — Commercial Ratio of Silver to Gold each Year since 1687. 



[Note.— From 1687 to 1832 the ratios are taken from the tables of Dr. A. Soetbeer; from 1833 to 1878 
from Pixley and Abell’s tables; and from 1878 to 1889 from daily cablegrams from London to the 
Bureau of the Mint.] 



Year. 


Ratio. 


Year. 


Ratio. 


Year. 


Ratio. 


Year. 


Ratio. 


Year. 


Ratio. 


Year. 


Ratio. 


1687.... 


14.94 


1721... 


15. 05 


1755... 


14.68 


1789... 


14.75 


1823... 


15. 84 


j 1857... 


15.27 


1688.... 


14.94 


1722... 


15. 17 


1756... 


14.94 


1790... 


15.04 


1824... 


15.82 


1 1858... 


15.38 


1689. . . . 


15.02 


1723... 


15.20 


1757... 


14.87 


1791... 


15. 05 


1825... 


15. 70 


1859... 


15.19 


1690.... 


15. 02 


1724... 


15.11 


1758... 


14. 85 


1792... 


15. 17 


1826... 


15.76 


1860... 


15.29 


1691.... 


14. 98 


1725... 


15.11 


1759... 


14.15 


1793... 


15.00 


1827... 


15.74 


1861... 


15.50 


1692.... 


14. 92 


1726... 


15. 15 


1760... 


14.14 


1794... 


15. 37 


1828... 


15. 78 


; 1862... 


15. 35 


1693.... 


14.83 


1727... 


15.24 


1761 . . . 


14.54 


1795... 


15.55 


1829... 


15. 78 


1 1863... 


15.37 


1694.... 


14. 87 


1728... 


15. 11 


1762... 


15.27 


1796... 


15.65 


1830... 


15. 82 


1864... 


15.37 


1695. . . . 


15. 02 


1729... 


14. 92 


1763... 


14.99 


1797... 


15.41 


1831... 


15.72 


1865... 


15.44 


1696. . . . 


15.00 


1730... 


14.81 


1764... 


14.70 


1798... 


15.59 


1832. . . 


15.73 


1866... 


15.43 


1697. . . . 


15.20 


1731... 


14.94 


1765... 


14.83 


1799... 


15.74 


1833... 


15.93 


1867... 


15.57 


1698.... 


15.07 


1732... 


15.09 


1766... 


14.80 


1800... 


15.68 


1834... 


15.73 


1868... 


15.59 


1699.... 


14.94 


1736... 


15. 18 


1767*-. 


14.85 


1801... 


15.46 


1835... 


15.80 


1869. . . 


15.60 


1700. . . . 


14. 81 


1734... 


15. 39 


1768... 


14.80 


1802. . . 


15.26 


1836... 


15.72 


1870... 


15.57 


1701.... 


15.07 


| 1735... 


15. 41 


1769... 


14. 72 


1803... 


15.41 


1837... 


15. 83 


1871... 


15.57 


1702.... 


15.52 


' 1736... 


15. 18 


j 1770... 


14.62 


1804... 


15.41 


1838... 


15.85 


1872... 


15.63 


1703.... 


15. 17 


1737... 


15. 02 


' 1771... 


14.66 


1805... 


15. 79 


1839... 


15.62 


1873... 


15.92 


1704. . . . 


15 22 [ 


1738... 


14. 91 


1772... 


14. 52 | 


1806... 


15. 52 


i 1840... 


15.62 


1874. . . 


16.17 


1705.... 


15. 11 


1739... 


14. 91 


1773... 


14.62 ' 


1807... 


15.43 


; 1841... 


15.70 


1875... 


16.59 


1706. . . . 


15.27 


1740... 


14. 94 


, 1774... 

j 


14.62 


1808... 


16.08 


: 1842... 


15. 87 


1876... 


17.88 


1707.... 


15.44 


1741... 


14. 92 


j 1775... 


14.72 i 


1809... 


15.96 


1843... 


15.93 


1877... 


17.22 


1708. . . . 


15.41 


1742... 


14. 85 


j 1776... 


14. 55 


1810... 


15. 77 


i 1844... 


15.85 


1878... 


17.94 


1709. . . . 


15.31 


1743... 


14. 85 


1777... 


14.54 . 


j 1811... 


15.53 i 


1845... 


15.92 


1879... 


18.40 


1710.... 


, 15.22 


1744... 


14. 87 


1778... 


14.68 


1812... 


16.11 


1846... 


15. 90 


1880... 


18. 05 


1711.... 


15.29 


1745... 


14.98 


1779... 


14.80 


I 1813... 


16. 25 


1847... 


15.80 


1881... 


18. 16 


1712. . . . 


15. 31 


1746... 


15. 13 


1780... 


14. 72 


j 1814... 


15.04 


1848... 


15.85 


1882... 


18. 19 


1713.... 


15.24 


1747... 


15. 26 


1781... 


14. 78 


1815... 


15. 26 


1849... 


15. 78 


1883... 


18.64 


1714. . . . 


15. 13 


1748... 


15. 11 


1782... 


14. 42 


, 1816... 


15. 28 


1850... 


15.70 


1884. . . 


18. 57 


1715.... 


15.11 | 


1749... 


14.80 


1783... 


14.48 


1817... 


15.11 


1851... 


15.46 


1885... 


19.41 


1716.... 


15.09 


1750... 


14. 55 


1784. . . 


14. 70 


1818... 


15. 35 


1852... 


15.59 


1886. . . 


20.78 


1717.... 


15.13 


1751... 


14. 39 


1785... 


14. 92 


1819... 


15.33 


1853... 


15.33 


1887... 


21. 13 


1718. . . . 


15.11 | 


1752... 


14.54 


1786... 


14. 96 


1820... 


15.62 


1854. . . 


15. 33 


1888... 


21.99 


1719.... 


15.09 j 


1753... 


14.54 


, 1787... 


14. 92 


00 

y—i 


15. 95 


1855... 


15. 38 


j 1889... 


22.09 


1720.... 


15.04 : 


1754... 


14.48 


' 1788... 

1 


14.65 


1822... 


15.80 


1856... 


15.38 i 


1890...' 


19. 76 



Digitized by ^.ooQle 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 191 

XXXV. — Product of Gold and Silver in the United States from 1792-1844, 

AND ANNUALLY SINCE. 

[The estimate for 1792-1873 is by R. W. Raymond, Commissioner, and since by the Director of the 

Mint.] 



Years. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Total. 


April 2, 1792— July 31, 1834 


$14, 000, 000 


Insignificant. 


$14,000,000 


July 31, 1834— December 31, 1844 


7, 500, 000 


$250,000 


7,750,000 


1845 


1, 008, 327 


50,000 


1,058,327 


1846 


1, 139, 357 


50,000 


1, 189, 357 


1847 


889, 085 


50,000 


939, 085 


1848 


10, 000, 000 


50,000 


10,050,000 


1849 


40, 000, 000 


50,000 


40, 050, 000 


1850 


50, 000, 000 


50,000 


50, 050, 000 


1851 


55, 000, 000 


50, 000 


55, 050, 000 


1852 


60, 000, 000 


50,000 


60, 050, 000 


1853 


65, 000. 000 


50,000 


65, 050, 000 


1854 


60, 000,000 


50,000 


60, 050, 000 


1855 


55, 000, 000 


50,000 


55, 050, 000 


1856 


55, 000, 000 


50,000 


55, 050, 000 


1857 


55, 000,000 


50,000 


55 050,000 


1858 


50, 000,000 


500,000 


50, 500,000 


1859 


50, 000,000 


100,000 


50, 100,000 


1860 


46, 000,000 


150,000 


46, 150, 000 


1861 


43, 000, 000 


2, 000,000 


45, 000, 000 


1862 


39, 200, 000 


4, 500,000 


43,700,000 


1863 


40, 000, 000 


8, 500,000 


48, 500, 000 


18C4 


46, 100, 000 


11, 000, 000 


57, 100, 000 


1865 


53, 225, 000 


11, 250,000 


64,475,000 


1866 


53, 500,000 


10, 000, 000 


63, 500,000 


1 867 


51,725,000 


13, 500, 000 


65, 225, 000 


1868 


48, 000, 000 


12, 000, 000 


60, 000,900 


1869 


49, 500, 000 


12,000,000 


61, 500, 000 


1870 


50, 000,000 


16,000,000 


66, 000, 000 


1871 


43, 500, 000 


23, 000,000 


66,500,000 


1872 


36, 000, 000 


28, 750, 000 


64, 750, 000 


1873 


36, 000, 000 


35,750,000 


71, 750, 000 


1874 


33, 500, 000 


37, 300, 000 


70,800,000 


1875 


33, 400, 000 


31,700,000 


65, 100, 000 


1876 


39, 900,000 


38,800,000 


78, 700, 000 


1877 


46, 900, 000 


39,800,000 


86, 700, 000 


1878 


51, 200, 000 


1 45,200,000 


96, 400, 000 


1879 


38, 900, 000 


40,800,000 


79,700,000 


1880 


36, 000, 000 


39,200,000 


75, 200, 000 


1881 


34, 700, 000 


43,000,000 


77,700,000 


1882 


32, 500,000 


46,800,000 


79,300,000 


1883 j 


30, 000, 000 


46, 200, 000 


76,200,000 


1884 i 


30,800,000 


, 48, 800, 000 


79,600,000 


1885 


31, 800, 000 


51,600,000 


83, 400, 000 


1886 


35, 000, 000 


51, 000, 000 


86, 000,000 


1887 


33,000,000 


53, 350, 000 


86, 350, 000 


1888 


33,175,000 


59, 195, 000 


92, 370, 000 


1889 


32,800,000 j 


64, 646, 000 


97, 446,000 


1800 


32,845,000 


70, 464, 000 


103, 309, 000 


Total 


1, 871, 706, 769 


997, 755, 000 


2, 869, 461, 760 



Digitized by C.ooQle 




192 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XXXVI*— Coinages of Nations. 
[Calendar years 1888, 1889, and 1890.] 



1888. 





Gold. 1 Silver. 


United States 

Mexico 

Great Britain 


$31, 380, 808 
300, 480 
9, 893, 375 
24, 415, 230 
1 108, 216 | 


! $33,025,606 

26, 658,964 
• 3, 681, 886 


India* 


36, 297, 132 
247, 174 
1, 112, 379 
1, 100, 518 


France 106,949 


Italy 


469, 750 
16,984 








4, 436, 804 
1,533,600 


Portugal 


102,600 
143, 051 
34, 340, 722 
| 2, 747, 633 


Germany 

Austria-Hungary t 

Norway 


989, 127 
5, 516, 190 
53,600 
16, 714 
62, 483 
1, 163, 126 
74, 448 
8, 483* 
10, 222, 108 
122, 375 






Denmark 






20, 460, 491 
66,000 
257, 154 
974, 335 
42, 170 
8, 316, 325 


Turkey 






Chili. 


Argentine Republic* 




3, 258, 000 
600, 443 

272.000 
883, 555 

244.000 
473, 177 

1, 105, 000 
1,763,452 






Venezuela 


660,500 
26, 082 


Brazil 


8t,raitn _ 


Ecuador ( 

Kftlltr 


Bolivia 




Total 




134, 828. 855 1 134, 922, 344 

1 





''Rupee calculated at coining rate, $0.4737. 
t Silver florin calculated at coining rate, $0,482. 
{Silver rouble calculated at coining rate, $0.7718. 



Digitized by 



Google 




REPORT! 1 OF THE DIRECTOR Ot THE MINT. 193 



XXXVI* — Coinages of Nations — Continued. 

/ 



Countries. 


1889. N 


1890. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Gold. 


Silver. 




$21, 413, 931 
319, 907 
36,502,636 
29, 325, 529, 
110, 328 


$35, 496, 683 
25, 294, 726 
10, 827, 602 


$20,467,182 
284, 859 
37, 375, 479 
25, 702, 600 


$39, 202, 908 
24, 081, 192 
8, 332, 232 










37, 937, 814 
16, 585 
71 

1, 302, 581 
60,208 
217, 125 
4,716,029 
680,400 
132,660 
177, 079 
4, 528, 259 
53, 600 
142,253 
27, 607 
1, 153, 651 


57, 931, 323 
38,000 








3, 373, 215 


3, 976,340 










263,329 
482,500 
9,049,569 
407, 160 


— ; 

, 1,091 

279,850 
1,479, 152 
540, OOCt 
198,990 




386,000 
3, 378, 631 
96,120 
823,943 
48, 166, 245 
3, 294, 987 










23, 835, 512 
2, 818, 750 




3, 857, 118 
120,600 
253,867 


Norway 


Sweden 


1, 080, 040 


833, 432 
547, 931 
21,726,239 
44,840 


Demnsrk 


Russia § -- 


18, 855,097 


1,614,422 


Turkey 


Si pit 1 , 




1,446,626 
9, 516, 359 




Japan •_ “ 


1,775, 010 


1, 194, 050 


7, 296, 645 
300,000 
2,842,530 


jlayti 


p©m 




2, 842, 531 
216, 136 
300,000 
1, 100,000 
258, 010 




Onlomhia 






Straits Settlements 









Hong-Koug 






430,000 


PoqtA "Rina 






Great Comoro 






1,978 
6,436 
567, 814 
28,951 


French Colonies 








Eritrea (Italian colony) 








British A friuav. 








Total 








168, 901, 519 


138,444,595 


149,009,772 


149,405,099 





♦Rupee calculated at coining rate, $0.4737. 
t Fiscal year. 

{Silver florin calculated at coining rate, $0,482. 
x $ Silver rouble calculated at coining rate, $0.7718. 

10285 M 13 



Digitized by 



Gqogl§ 






194 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XXXVII.— World's Production of Gold and 
[K ilogram of gold, $664.60. Kilogram of sflver, $41.56. 



Countries. 


1888. 


Gold. 


Silver. 




Kilos. 


Dollars . 


Kilos. 


Dollars. 


United States 


49, 917 


33, 175,000 


1,424,326 


59, 195, 000 


Australasia 


42,974 


28, 560,660 


120,308 


•5,000,000 


Mexico 


1,465 


974,000 


995,500 


41,373,000 


European countries : 










Russia 


32,052 


21, 302, 000 


14, 523 


604, 000 


Germany : 


1,792 


1, 190, 963 


32, 051 


1, 332, 022 


Austria-Hungary 


1,820 


1, 209, 572 


52,128 


2,166,440 


Swedeu 


76 


50,000 


4,648 


193,000 








fc 5, 147 


214,000 


Italy 


148 


98,000 


35 


1,454 








51,502 


2, 140, 400 


Turkey 


<10 


7,000 


<1,323 


55,000 








49, 396 


2, 053, 000 


Great Britain 


220 


146,000 


9,047 


376,000 


Dominion of Canada 


1,673 


1, 111, 959 


9,264 


385,000 


South American countries: 










Argentine Republic 


47 


31,000 


10,226 


425,000 


Colombia 


4,514 


3, 000,. 000 


24, 061 


1,000,000 


Bolivia ... 


90 


59,800 


230,460 


9,578,000 


Chili 


2,953 


1,962,430 


185, 851 


j 7, 723, 957 


\ 

Brazil 


670 


445, 300 






Venezuela 


2,130 


1, 415, 598 




i 


Guiana (British) 


450 


299,070 






Guiana (Dutch) 


487 


324,000 






Peru 


158 | 


105,000 j 


75,263 


3, 128,000 


Central American States 


226 ' 


8150,000 ! 


48, 123 


| 82,000,000 


Japan 


h 606 


403,000 


*42, 424 


1, 763, 140 


Africa ... 


771 


4,500,000 






Chios i- 


k 13, 542 


9,000,000 






Tiwlia (British) 


1, 018 


676,563 












Total 


159, 809 


110, 196, 915 


3,385,606 


140,706,413 



•Estimate of the Bureau of the Mint. 
b Estimated the same as officially communicated for 1889. 
•Estimated the same as officially communicated for 1888. 
‘‘Estimated the same as officially communicated for 1886. 
•Estimated the same as officially communicated for 1890. 

“ Jaarcijifers over 1888 en vorige jaaren,” No. 8, page 115. 



Digitized by C.ooQle 







REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT, 



195 



Silver, Calendar Year 1888, 1889, an£ 1890. 
Coining rate in United States silver dollars.] 



1889. 


1890. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


* Gold. 


Silver. 


Kilo*. 


Dollar p. 


Kilos. 


Dollars. 


Kilos. 


Dollars. 


Kilos. 


Dollars. 


49, 853 


32, 800, 000 


1, 555, 486 


64, 646,000 


49, 421 


32, 845, 000 


1, 695, 500 


70,465,000 


49, 784 


33,086, 700 


144,369 


• 6, 000, 000 


45, 767 


30,416, 500 


312,033 


12, 968, 080 


1,053 


700,000 


1, 335, 828 


55, 517, 000 


1,154 


767, 000 


1,203,080 


50,000,000 


34, 867 


23, 173, 000 


14,389 


598, 000 


31, 841 


21,161,700 


13,667 


568,000 


1,958 


1, 301. 286 


32,040 


1, 331, 576 


1,851 


1, 230, 000 


36,092 


1, 500,000 


2, 198 


1, 461, 000 


52, 651 


2, 188, 000 


2, 104 


1, 398, 500 


50, 613 


2,103,500 


74 


. 48,900 


4,267 


177, 400 


88 


58,500 


4, 181 


173,760 






5, 147 


214,000 






5,539 


230,200 


• 148 


98,000 


•35 


1,454 


•148 


98,000 


•35 


1,454 






• 51,502 


2, 140, 400 






• 51, 502 


2, 140,400 


<*10 


7,000 


<* 1, 323* 


55, 000 


<*10 


7,000 


•* 1, 323 


55,000 


400 


266, OpO 


80, 942 


3, 363, 950 


*>400 


266,000 


fc 80, 942 


3, 363, 950 


97 


64,370 


9,522 


396, 734 


50 


33,000 


6,794 


282,375 


2,250 


1, 495, 000 


11,925 


495, 600 


b 2, 250 


1, 495, 000 


b 11, 925 


495,600 


•123 


82, 000 


•14, 681 


610, 150 


123 


82,000 


14, 681 


610, 150 


'5, 161 


3,430,000 


14, 725 


612,000 


5,560 


3, 695, 000 


17, 685 


735,000 


•90 


59,800 


•230,460 


9, 578, 000 


•90 


59, 800 


•230,460 


9,578,000 


2, 162 


1, 436, 600 


123, 695 


5,140, 764 


*>2, 162 


1, 436, 600 


*>123,695 


5, 140,764 


670 


•445,300 






•670 


445,300 




i 


2,765 


1,838,000 j 






1,742 


1, 158, 000 






882 


586,177 






t • 

1,693 


1,125,000 






487 


324,000 






814 


541,000 


i. 


140 


93,044 


68. 575 


2, 850, 000 


104 


69,000 


65, 791 


2, 734, 300 


226 


k 150, 000 


48,123! *2,000,000 


8226 


150,000 


e48, 123 


2, 000,000 


h 606 


403,000 


*>42,424 


1, 763, 140 


*382 


254,000 


*36, 855 


1, 531, 700 


12, 920 


8,586,632 






14,877 


9,887,000 






13,542 


•9,000,000 


i 

i , 

I 


* 8, 020 


5,330,000 






2, 261 


1, 502, 660 


1 


3,009 

! 


2, 000, 000 

t 






■ 




> 




184,227 ^ 


122, 438, 469 ; 


3, 842, 109 


159, 678, 168 


174,556 

1 


116, 008, 900 


4, 010, 516 


166, 677, 233 



s Rough estimates, based on exports. 

*• Product of private mines in 1888; Government mines in 1889. 

5 Product of Imperial household mines in 1890; private mines in 1888. 
k Imports of gold into Groat Britain and British India from China. 
Imports of gold bullion from China into London and India. 



Digitized by Google 




196 REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

XXXVIII.— Coinage of the Mints of the United States 



[Coinage of the mist at Philadelphia from 




Note. — Not susceptible of exact statement by years of actual date of coin, the registry of annual 
having been invariably completed within the year of the date of coin, as now required. 



Digitized by 



Google 





197 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

FROM THEIR ORGANIZATION, BY CALENDAR YEARS. 

Its organization, 1793, to June 30, 1891.] 



SILVER COINAGE. 



Trade 

dollars. 


Dollars. 


Half dollars. 


Quarter 

dollars. 


Twenty 

cents. 


Dimes. 


Half dimes. 


Three 

cents. 




$204, 791. 00 

72. 920. 00 
7,776.00 

327. 536. 00 

423. 515. 00 

220. 920. 00 

54. 454. 00 

41. 650. 00 

66. 064.00 
lb, 570. 90 

321.00 


$161,572.00 








$4, 320. 80 
511.50 
2,226.35 




$1, 473. 50 
r*. oo 




$2, 213. 50 
2,526.10 
2, 755.00 






1, 959.00 






























2. 176. 00 

3. 464. 00 
1,097.50 

3.304.00 
826.50 

12, 078. 00 


1,200.00 

1. 695. 50 
650.50 

1. 892. 50 






15. 144. 50 
14, 945. 00 

15. 857. 50 

78. 259. 50 

105. 861. 00 
r 419, 788. 00 
' 525, 788. 00 

684. 300. 00 

702. 905. 00 

638. 138. 00 

601. 822. 00 
814, 029. 50 
620, 951.50 
519, 537. 50 
























1,684.50 
30, 348.50 
51. 531. 00 
55, 160. 75 










780.00 
















16, 500. 00 

























4, 471. 00 
635.50 
6, 518.00 


















































i 










42, 150.00 


j 





* 


17, 308. 00 
5, 000. 75 










23, 575. 00 
0w7, 783. 50 

980. 161.00 

1. 104. 000. 00 
375, 561. 00 
652, 898. 50 
779,786.50 ] 

847.100.00 

1.752.477.00 
1, 471, 583. 00 

2. 002. 090. 00 

2. 746. 700. 00 

1. 537. 600. 00 

1. 856. 078. 00 

2.382.400.00 

2. 936. 830. 00 
2, 398, 500. 00 

2. 603.000. 00 

3. 206. 002. 00 

2.676. 003.00 

3. 273. 100. 00 

1. 814. 910. 00 

1. 773. 000. 00 
1,667, 280. 00 

717. 504. 00 
155,000.00 

1. 006. 382. 00 

1. 922. 000. 00 








1 

i 


















90, 293. 50 
36, 000. 00 
' 31, 861. 00 
54, 212. 75 
16, 020. 00 
1 4,450.00 1 

i 












’ 
















94,258.70 ! 
118,651.20 j 
10,000.00 
44,000.00 

1 


















































42,000.00 




51, 000. 00 




















1,000.00 
25,500.00 ' 




121.500.00 

12.500.00 

77. 000. 00 

51.000. 00 

77.135.00 | 

52. 250. 00 

48.500.00 

63. 500.00 
i 141,000.00 

119. 000. 00 
104, 200. 00 

199.250.00 
105, 311. 50 

135.858.00 

162. 250.00 

188.750.00 

137.000. 00 












; 










61. 500. 00 
62,000.00 

62. 135. 00 

48. 250. 00 

68. 500. 00 

74. 000. 00 
138,000.00 

95. 000. 00 

113. 800. 00 

112.750.00 
53,457.50 
67, 204. 25 

57. 500. 00 

40.750.00 

58. 250. 00 








! 








99, 500.00 
80, 000. 00 
39, 000.00 

71.500.00 
488, 000. 00 
118,000.00 

63. 100.00 
208, 000. 00 
122,786.50 

47, 031. 75 
30, 000. 00 
22, 000. 00 
161, 400. 00 


































__ • 




1,000.00 






















300.00 
61, 005.00 
173, 000. 00 

184.618.00 j 

165.100.00 






























! 







coinage being of coin delivered by coiners of mints within the given year, and these deliveries not 

Digitized by Google 



A 





11 ) 8 . 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XXXVIII. — Coinage of tuf. Mints of the Unitf.d States 
[C oinage of the mint at Philadelphia from 



GOLD COINAGE. 



Calendar years. 


Double 





Half 


Three 


Quarter 




eagles. 




eagles. 


dollars. 


eagles. 


1R11 




$63, 610 


$1, 701, 650 




$16 960 00 


1845 I 


261, 530 


2, 085 495 




•^*>7 627 50 


1846 




200, 950 


1, 979, 710 




53 995 00 


1847 




8, 622, 580 


4 579 905 




74 5^5 00 


1848 




1, 454, 840 


1,303 875 




22 215 00 


1849 




6, 536, 180 


665, 350 




58 235 Oft 


1850 


$23, 405, 220 


2, 914, 510 


322, 455 




632 307 50 


1851 


41, 743, 100 


1, 763, 280 


1, 887, 525 




3,431 870 00 


1852 


41,060,520 


2,031,060 


2, 869, 505 




2, 899 202 50 


1853 


25. 226, 520 


2, 012, 530 


1 528 850 




3 511 670 00 


1854 ^ 


15, 157, 980 


542,500 


803, 375 


$415,854 


1.490,645.00 


1855 


7,293,020 


1,217,010 


585,490 


151, 665 


588, 700.00 


1856 


6, 597, 560 


604,900 


989,950 


.78,030 


960, 600.00 


1857 


8, 787, 500 


166,060 


490,940 


62, 673 


535, 325. 00 


1858 


4, 234, 280 


25, 210 


75,680 


6, 399 


118, 442.50 


1859 


871,940 


160, 930 


84, 070 


46, 914 


98, 610.00 


1800 


11,553,400 


117, 830 


99, 125 


21,465 


56, 687. 50 


1861 


59, 529, 060 


1,132,330 


3, 199, 750 


18, 216 


3, 181,295.00 


1862 


1,842,660 


109, 950 


22, 325 


17,355 


280, 882. 50 


1863 


2, 855,800 


12,480 


12, 360 


15, 117 


75.00 


1864 


4, 085, 700 


35,800 


21,100 


8,040 


7, 185. 00 


1865 


7, 024, 000 


40, 050 


6, 475 


3,495 


3, 862. 50 


1866 


13,975.500 


37, 800 


33,600 


12,090 


7, 775. 00 


1867 


5,021,300 


31,400 


34,000 


7,950 


8, 125. 00 


1868 


1, 972, 000 


106,550 


28, 625 


14, 625 


9, 062. 50 


1869 


3, 503, 100 


18, 550 


8, 925 


7, 575 


10, 862. 50 


1870 


3, 103, 700 


25, 350 


20, 175 


10,605 


11,387.50 


1871 


1, 603, 000 


17,800 


16, 150 


3,990 


13,375.00 


1872 


5, 037, 600 


16,500 


8,450 


6, 090 


7, 575. 00 


1873 


34, 196, 500 


8, 250 


562, 525 


75 


445, 062. 50 


1874 | 


7, 336, 000 


531,600 


17, 540 


: 125, 460 


9, 850.00 


1875 


5, 914, 800 


1,200 


1,100 


60 


1, 050. 00 


1876 


11, 678, 100 


7,320 


7, 385 


135 


10, 552. 50 


1877 


7,953,400 


8, 170 


5,760 


4,464 


| 4,130.00 


1878 


10,872,900 


738,000 


658, 700 


246, 972 


715, 650.00 


1879 


4, 152, 600 


3, 847, 700 


1, 509, 750 


9,090 


222, 475. 00 


1880 


1,029,120 


16, 448, 760 


15,832,180 


3, 108 


7,490.00 


1881 


45,200 


38, 772, 600 


28, 544, 000 


1,650 


1, 700. 00 


1882 ‘ 


12,600 


23, 244, 800 


12,572,800 


4,620 


10, 100. 00 


1883 


*00 


• 2,087,400 


1,167,200 


2, 820 


4, 900.00 


1884 


1,420 


769, 050 


955,240 


3,318 


4, 982. o0 


1885 


16,560 


2, 535, 270 


3, 007, 030 


2, 730 


2, 217. 50 


1886 


22, 120 


2,361,600 


1, 942, 160 


3,426 


10, 220. 00 


1887 


2,420 


536,800 


435 


18,480 


15, 705. 00 


1888 


4, 525, 320 


1,329,960 


91,480 


15,873 j 


j 40, 245. 00 


1889 


882, 220 


44, 850 


37, 825 


7,287 


44, 120. 00 


1890 


1, 519, 900 


580, 430 


21, 640 




22, 032. 50 






Total 


385, 646, 740 


129,188,610 


118, 053, 550 


1,357, 716 


22, 637, 520. 00 


Jan. 1, 189 J, to June 30, 












1891 


8,500 


457,550 


8, 105 




8, 857. 50 






Total 


.85, (.55, 240 i 
1 


129, 646, 160 

1 


1 18 061, 655 : 
. 1 


1,357,716 

1 


22, 646, 377. 50 



Dollars. 



$688,567 
481,953 
3,317,671 
2, 045, 351 
4, 076, 051 
1, 639. 445 
758, 269 
1, 762, 936 
774, 789 
117, 995 
168,244 
36,668 
527,499 
1,326,865 

6.250 
5,950 
3, 725 
7, 180 

5. 250 
10,525 

5,925 
6,335 
3,930 
3,530 
125, 125 
198, 820 
420 
3,245 
3,920 
3,020 
3,030 
1, 636 
7,66<r 
5,040 
10,840 
6,206 
12,205 
6,016 
8,543 
16,080 
30,729 



18,223,438 



18, 223, 438 



Digitized by 



Google 





REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

FROM THEIR ORGANIZATION, BY CALENDAR YEARS— Continued, 
its organization, 1793, to /June 30, 1891.] 



199 



Trad© 

dollars. 



$397,500 
987,800 
218,900 
456,150 
’,0 59,710 
900 
1,541 
1,987 
960 
1,097 
979 



SILVER COINAGE. 



Dollars. 

$20,000 

24. 500 
110, 600 
140, 760 

15.000 
62,600 

7,500 
1,300 
1,100 
46, 110 
33,140 

26.000 

63.500 
94,000 



256,500 
218, 930 
78,500 
12,090 
27,660 
31, 170 
47,000 
49, 625 
60,325 
182, 700 
424,300 
433,000 
1, 115,760 
1, 106, 450 
293,600 



10, 509, 550 

14. 807. 100 
12 1 , 601, 355 

9, 163, 975 

11 . 101. 100 
12, 291,039 
14,070,875 
17,787,767 
19, 963, 886 
20, 290, 710 
19, 183, 833 
21,726,811 
16,802,590 



Half dollars. 


Quarter 

dollars. 


Twenty 

cents. 


Dimes. 


Half dimes. 


Three 

cents. 


$883, 000.00 


$105, 300. 00 




$7, 250. 00 


$21, 500. 00 




294, 500.00 


230, 500. 00 




175, 500. 00 


78, 200. 00 




1, 105, 000. 00 


127, 500. 00 




3, 130. 00 


1,350.00 




578, 000. 00 


183, 500. 00 




24, 500.00 


03, 700. 00 




290, 000. 00 


36, 500.00 




45, 150. 00 


33, 400. 00 




626, 000. 00 


85, 000. 00 




83, 900.00 


65, 450. 00 




113, 500. 00 


47, 700. 00 




193, 150. 00 


47, 750. ,00 




100, 375.00 


40, 000. 00 




102, 650. 00 


39,050.00 


$163, 422.00 


38, 565.00 


44, 265. 00 




163, 550. 00 


50, 025.00 


559,905.00 


1,766,354.00 


3, 813,555.00 




1,217, 301.00 


667, 251.00 


342, 000. 00 


1,491,000.00 


3, 095, 000. 00 




447, 000. 00 


287,000.00 


20, 130. 00 


379, 750. 00 


714, 250. 00 




207, 500.’ 00 


87,500.00 


4, 170.00 


469, 000.00 


1, 816, 000. 00 




578, 000. 00 


244,000.00 


43, 740. 00 


994,000.00 


2, 411, 000. 00 




558, 000. 00 


364, 000. 00 


31, 260.00 


2, 113,000.00 


1, 842, 000. 00 




154,000.00 


175,000.00 


48,120.00 


374, 000. 00 


336, 000. 00 




43, 000.00 


17,000.00 


10,950.00 


151, 850.00 


201,350.00 




60, 700. 00 


39,950.00 


8,610.00 


1, 444, 200.00 


1, 213, 650. 00 




192, 400. 00 


164,050.00 


14, 940.00 


126, 175.00 


233, 137. 50 





84, 755. 00 


74, 627.50 


10, 906. 50 


251,830. 00 


48, 015. 00 




1,446.00 


923.00 


643.80 


189, 785. 00 


23, 517. 50 




3, 907.00 


23.50 


14. 10 


255, 950.00 


14, 825. 00 




1, 050.00 


675.00 


255.00 


372,812.50 


4,381.25 




872. 50 


536.25 


681.75 


212, 162. 50 


5, 156. 25 




662. 50 


431.25 


138.75 


189, 100. 00 


7, 500. 00 




46, 625.00 


4, 295. 00 


123.00 


397, 950. 00 


4, 150. 00 




25,660.00 


10,430.00 


153.00 


300, 450.00 


21, 850. 00 




47, 150. 00 


26,830.00 


120.00 


582,680.00 


42, 808. 00 




75, 361. 00 


74,443.00 


127.80 


440, 775.00 


45, 737. 50 




239, 645.00 


147, 397. 50 


58.50 


1,308,750. 00 


371, 075. 00 




394,710.00 


35,630.00 


18.00 


1, 180, 150. 00 


117, 975. 00 




294, 070. 00 






3,013,750.00 


1,073,375.00 


$7,940 


1,035,070.00 






4, 209, 575. 00 


4, 454, 287. 50 


3, 180 


1, 146, 115. 00 






4, 152, 255. 00 


2, 727, 927. 50 


102 


731,051.00 






689, 200. 00 


565, 200. 00 


120 


167, 880. 00 






2,950.00 


3, 675. 00 




1,510.00 






4, 877. 50 


3, 738. 75 




3,735.50 






5, 487. 50 


3, 243. 75 




2,497.50 






2, 750. 00 


4, 075. 00 




391, 110. 00 * 






4, 519. 50 


3, 859. 75 




?67,571.20 






2, 637. 50 


2, 218. 75 




336, 638. 00 






3, 065. 00 


3, 632. 50 




253, 342. 70 






2, 943. 00 


1, 471. 50 




637, 757. 00 






2, 855. 00 


2, 677. 50 




1,128,393.90 






6, 416. 50 


2, 708. 25 




549, 648. 70 






6, 355. 50 


3, 177. 75 




738, 071. 10 






6, 295.00 


20,147. 50 




991, 154.10 












82,326,758.50 


28, 172, 839. 50 


11,342 


16, 558, 770. 20 


3,948,791.90 


1,260,487.20 


76,575.00 


195, 087. 50 




633, 035.00 






82,403,333.50 


28, 347, 927. 00 


11, 342 


17, 191,805.20 


8,948,791.90 


1,260,487.20 



5,107,524 



207,308, 841 
7, 150, 350 



|5. 107, 524 



214,459, 191 



Digitized by 





200 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XXXVIII.— Coinage or the Mints of tiif. United States 



[Coinage of the mint at Philadelphia from 



Calendar years. 


MINOR COINAGE. 


Five cents. 


Three cents. 


Two cents. 


1793-1795 1 . . 








1796 








1797 








1798 








' 








1800 ! 1 






1801 








1802 : 








1803 








1804 








1805. 








1806 








1807 








1808 








1809 








i£io 








1811 


















1813. 








1814 








1815 








1816 - 






' 


1817 








1818 








1819 








1820 








1821 








1822 








1823 








1824 








1825 








1826 








1827 








1828 








1829 








1830 









1831 








1832 .. 








1833 








1834 








1835 








1836 


1 






1837 


! 






1838,. 


I 






1839 








1840. . 














1842 .1 * 






1843 

















Digitized by Google 





REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 20L 

FROM' THKI.R ORGANIZATION, BY CALENDAR YEARS— Continued. 



its organization, 1793, to June 30, 1891.) 



MINOR COINAGE. 


TOTAL COINAGE. 


Cents. 


Half cents. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Minor. 


Total. 


$10, 600. 33 


$712.67 


$71, 485. 00 


$370, 683. 80 


$11, 373.00 


$453,541.80 


9, 747. 00 


577. 40 


77, 960. 00 


77, 118.50 


10, 324.40 


165,402.90 


8, 975. 10 


535.24 


128, 190. 00 


14, 550. 45 


9, 510. 34 


152, 250. 79 


9, 797. 00 




205, 610. 00 


330, 291. 00 


. 9,797.00 


545, 698. 00 


9,045.85 


60.83 


213,285.00 


423, 515. 00 


9, 106. 68 


645,906.68 


28,221.75 


1,057.65 


317, 760. 00 


224, 296.00 


29, 279. 40 


571,335.40 


13, 628. 37 




422, 570. 00 


74, 758. 00 


13,628.37 


510,956.37 


34,351.00 


71.83 


423, 310. 00 


58,343.00 


34,422.83 


516,975.83 


24, 713. 53 


489.50 


258, 377. 50 


87, 118. 00 


25,203. 03 


370, 698. 53 


7, 568.38 


5,276.56 


258, 642. 50 


100, 340. 50 


12,844.94 


371,827.94 


9,411.16 


4,072.32 


170, 367. 50 


149, 388. 50 


13, 483. 48 


333,239.48 


3,480.00 


1,780.00 


324, 505. 00 


471, 319. 00 


5,260.00 


801, 084. 00 


7,272.21 


2, 380. 00 


437, 495. 00 


597, 448. 75 


9,652.21 


1,044,595.96 


11, 090. 00 


2,000.00 


284,665.00 


684,300.00 


13, 090. 00 


982,055.00 


2, 228. 67 


5,772.86 


169, 375. 00 


707, 376. 00 


8, 001. 53 


884,752.53 


14, 585. 00 


1, 075. 00 


501,435.00 


638, 773. 50 


15, 660. 00 


1, 155,868.50 


2, 180. 25 


315. 70 


497,905.00 


608, 340. 00 


2, 495. 9& 


1,108,740.95 


10,755.00 




290,435.00 


814, 029. 50 


10,755.00 


1,115,219.50 


4,180.00 




477, 140. 00 


620, 951. 50 


4, 180. 00 


1, 102,271.50 


3, 578. 30 




77, 270. 00 


561, 687. 50 


3,578.30 


642, 535. 80 






3, 175.00 


17 308 00 




20,483 00 


28, 209. 82 




28, 575. 75 


28, 209. 82 


56,785 57 


39, 484. 00 






607, 783. 50 


39, 484. 00 


647 267 60 


31, 670. 00 




242, 940. 00 


1,070,454.50 


31, 670. 00 


1, 345, 064. 50 


26,710.00 




258, 615.00 


1, 140, 000. 00 


26, 710. 00 


1,425, 325.00 


44,075.50 1 




1, 319, 030. 00 


501,680.70 


44, 075. 50 


1,864,786.20 


3, 890. 00 




189, 325. 00 


825, 762.45 * 


3,890.00 


1, 018, 977. 45 


20,723.39 




88,980.00 


805,806.50 


20, 723. 39 


915,509.89 






72, 425. 00 


895,550.00 




967, 975. 00 


12,620.00 




93, 200. 00 


1,752,477.00 


12, 620. 00 


1,858,297.00 


14, 611. 00 


315.00 


156, 385. 00 


1, 564, 583. 00 


14,926.00 


1,735, 894.00 


15, 174. 25 


1,170.00 


92, 245. 00 


2, 002, 090. 00 


16, 344. 25 


2,110, 679. 25 


23, 677. 32 




131, 565. 00 


2,869,200.00 


23, 577. 32 


3,024,342.32 


22, 606.24 


3,030.00 


140, 145.00 


1, 575, 600. 00 


25,636,24 


1,741,381.24 


14,145.00 


2,435.00 


295, 717. 50 


1, 994, 578. 00 


16,580,00 


2,306, 875.50 


17, 115. 00 




643,105.00 


2,495, 400.00 


17,115.00 


3,155,620.00 


33, 592. 60 


11.00 


714, 270. 00 


3, 175, 600. 00 


33, 603, 60 


3,923,473.60 


23,620.00 




798,435.00 


2, 579, 000. 00 


23, 620.00 


3,401,055.00 


27,390.00 


770.00 


978, 550. 00 


2, 759, 000. 00 


28, 160. 00 


3,765,710.00 


18,551.00 


600.00 


3, 954, 270. 00 


3,415, 002.00 


19, 151, 00 


7, 388,423.00 


38, 784.00 


705.00 


2, 186. 175. 00 


3,443, 003.00 


39,489.00 


5, 668, 667. 00 


21, 110. 00 


1,990.00 


4, 135, 700. 00 


3, 606, 100. 00 


23,100.00 


7,764,900.00 


55,583.00 


» 


1, 148, 305. 00 


2, 096, 010. 00 


55, 583.00 


3,299,898.00 


63, 702. 00 




1, 622, 515. 00 


2, 293, 000. 00 


63,702.00 


3,979,217.00 


' 31, 286. 81 




1, 040, 747. 50 


1, 949, 135, 50 


31, 286. 61 


3, 021, 169. 61 


24,627.00 




1,207,437.50 


1, 028, 603. 00 


24,627.00 


2,260,667.50 


15.973,67 




710,475. 00 


577,750.00 


15, 973. 67 


1,304,198.67 


23,833.90 




960, 017. 50 


1,442,500.00 


23, 833.90 


2,426,351.40 


24, 283.20 




4, 062, 010. 00 


2,443,750.00 


24,283,20 


6,530,043.20 



Digitized by Google 




202 



REPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



„ XXX Vll I .—Coinage of the Mixts of thk United States 



[Coinage of the mint at Philadelphia from 



' 

Calendar year. 


MINOR COINAGE. 


Five cent#, j Three cents. 


Two cents. 


1844... 


j 




1945 


i 




1 




1847 






184 8 


, * 




1849 






1850 


:::::::::: 




1851 / 


1 




1852 


i 




1853 


i 




1854 1 1 1 




1855 i 




‘ 


1856 ! 






1857 






■ 


1858 









1859 








1800 









1861 








1862 1 






1863 









1864 







$396,950.00 
272, 800. 00 

63.540.00 

58. 775. 00 

56.075.00 

30.930.00 

17. 225. 00 
. 14,425.00 

1,300.00 


1865 




$341, 460.00 

144. 030. 00 

117.450.00 

97.560.00 
48, 120. 00 

40.050.00 

18. 120. 00 

25. 860. 00 

35. 190. 00 

23. 700. 00 

6.840.00 

4. 860.00 


*866 

1867 

1868 


$737, 125. 00 

1. 545. 475. 00 

1. 440. 850. 00 

819. 750. 00 

240. 300.00 
28,050.00 

301.800.00 

227. 500.00 

176. 900.00 

104. 850. 00 
126, 500. 00 


1869. 


1870 


1871 


1872 


1873 


1874 . 




1875 




1876 




1877 




1878 


117.50 
1, 455. 00 
997. 75 
3, 618. 75 
573,830.00 
1, 148,471.05 
563, 697. 10 
73,824.50 
166, 514. 50 

763. 182. 60 
536, 024. 15 
794,068.05 

812. 963. 60 


70.50 

1,236.00 

748.65 

32,417.25 

759.00 

318.27 

169.26 

143. 70 

128.70 
238.83 

1, 232. 49 
646.88 




1879 




1880 




1881 




1882 




1883 




1884 




1885 




1886 




1887 




1888 


* 


1889 




1890 




Total 






11, 187, 864. 55 
333, 370.00 


941, 849. 48 


912,020.00 


Jan nary 1, 1891, to June 30, 1891 


Total 






11,521, 234.55 


941,349.48 


912,020.00 





Digitized by C.oo;QLe 



REPORT OE THE DIRECTOR OP THE MINT. 203 

from their Organization* by Calendar Years— -Continued. 



ita organization, 1793, to June 30, 1891.] 



MINOR COINAGE. 


* 


TOTAL COINAGE. 




Cents. 


Half cents. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Minor. 


Total. 


$23,987.52 




$1,782, 220.00 


$1, 037, 050. 00 


$23, 987. 52 


$2, 843,257.42 


38,948.04 




2, 574, 052. 50 


803,200.00 


38,948.04 


3,416,800.54 


41, 208. 00 




2, 234, 655. 00 


1,347,580.00 


41, 208. 00 


3, 623, 443. 00 


61,830.69 




13,277, 020.00 


990, 450.00 


61, 836. 69 


14,329,306.69 


64, 157. 99 




2,780,930.00 


420, 050. 00 


64, 157. 99 


3,265,137.99 


41, 785. 00 


$199. 32 


7, 948, 332. 00 


922, 950. 00 


41, 984. 32 


8,913, 266. 32 


44,268.44 


199.06 


27, 756,445.50 


409, 600.00 


44, 467. 50 


28, 210, 513.00 


98, 897. 07 


738. 36 


52,143,446.00 


446, 797. 00 


99, 035. 43 


52,689, 878.43 


50, 630. 94 




51, 505, 638. 50 


' 847, 410. 00 


50, 630.94 


, 52, 403, 679. 44 


66, 411. 31 


v 648.47 


36, 355, 621. 00 


7, 852, 571. 00 


67, 059. 78 


44, 275, 251. 78 


42, 361. 56 


276. 79 


20, 049, 799. 00 


5, 373, 270. 00 


42, 638. 35 


25, 465, 707. 35 


15,748.29 


282.50 


10, 594, 454. 00 


1, 419, 170. 00 


16, 030. 79 


12,029, 654. 79 


26, 904. 63 


202. 15 


10,993,976.00 


3, 214, 240. 00 


27, 106. 78 


14, 235, 322. 78 


177, 834. 56 


175.90 


10, 817, 287. 00 


' 4, 452, 260. 00 


178, 010.46 


15, 447, 5o7. 46 


246, 000. 00 




4,578, 006.50 


4, 332, 120. 00 


246, 000. 00 


9, 156, 126. 50 


364, 000. 00 




1, 430, 708. 00 


1, 037, 450. 00 


364, 000. 00 


2,832,158.00 


205, 660. 00 




11, 885, 175. 50 


681, 390. 00 


205, 660. 00 


12, 772,225.50 


101, 000. 00 




67, 588, 150. 00 


3, 107, 740. 00 


101*009.00 


70, 796, 890. 00 


280, 750. 00 




3, 600, 037. 50 


541, 691.50 


280, 750.00 


4, 422, 479. 00 


498,400.00 




2,902,082.00 


330, 517. 80 


498, 400. 00 


3, 730, 999. 80 


520, 737. 14 




4, 163, 775. 00 


248, 417. 10 


926, 687. 14 


5,338,879.24 


354, 292. 86 




7, 081, 607. 50 


319, 755. 00 


968, 552. 86 


8, 369, 915. 36 


08, 265. 00 




14, 078, 945. 00 


428, 909. 25 


1,042,960.00 


15, 545, 814. 25 


98, 210. 00 




5, 108, 625. 00 


278, 876. 25 


1, 819, 910.00 


7, 207, 411. 25 


102,665.00 





2, 141, 387. 50 


430, 343. 00 


1, 697, 130. 00 


4, 268, 880, 50 


64,200.00 




3, 554, 937. 50 


862,643.00 


963, 000. 00 


5,380,580.50 


52,750.00 




3, 177,552.50 


829, 400. 00 


350, 325. 00 


4, 357, 277. 50 


39,295.00 




1, 658, 245. 00 


1, 891, 179. 80 


99, 890. 00 


3, 649, 314. 80 


40, 420. 00 




5, 079, 745. 00 


1, 980, 063. 50 


369, 380. 00 


7,429, 188.50 


116,765.00 




35, 337, 537. 50 


2, 801, 283. 00 


379, 455. 00 


38, 518,275.50 


141,875.00 


i 


8, 219, 270. 00 


2, 579, 995. 00 


342, 475. 00 | 


11,141,740.00 


135, 280. 00 


1 . .. 

i 


5, 918, 630. 00 


5, 349, 035.00 


246,970.00 


11, 514, 635. 00 


79, 440. 00 


1 


11, 706, 737. 50 


10, 269, 307. 50 


210, 800. 00 


22, 186, 845. 00 


8, 525. 00 


; 


^ 7, 979, 844. 00 


10, 651,045. 50 


8,525.00 


18, 639, 414. 50 


57, 998. 50 




13,235,242.00 


11, 932, 850. 00 


58, 186. 50 


25, 226, 278. 50 


162, 312. 00 




9, 744, 645. 00 


14, 816, 770. 00 


165, 003. 00 


24, 726, 424. 00 


389, 649. 55 




33, 322, 294. 00 


12, 015, 093. 75 


391, 395. 95 


46,329,383.70 


392, 115. 75 




67, 372, 810. 00 


9, 176, 163. 75 


428, 151. 75 


76, 977, 125. 50 


385, 811.00 




35, 849, 960.00 


11, 500, 132. 00 


960, 400. 00 


48, 310, 492. 00 


455,981.09 




3, 273, 960. 00 


13, 067, 968. 45 


1, 604, 770. 41 


17, 946, 698. 86 


232, 617. 42 




l/>740, 216. 50 


14, 412, 369. 25 


796, 483. 78 


16,949,069.53 


_ 117,653.84 




. 5, 576, 512. 50 


18, 047, 807. 20 


191, 622. 04 


23, 815, 941. 74 


176,542.90 




4,345, 542.00 


20, 606, 057. 50 


343, 186. 10 


25, 294, 785. 60 


452,264.83 




582,383.00 


21, 424, 636. 40 


1, 215, 686. 20 


23, 222, 705. 66 


374, 944. 14 




■ 6,018,958.00 


19, 742, 606. 45 


912, 200. 78 


J6, 673, 765. 23 


488,693.61 




1, 047, 031. 00 


22, 474, 415. 35 


1,283, 408.49 


24, 804, 854. 84 


571,828.54 


1 


2,144,002.50 


17, 820, 186. 60 


1, 384, f92. 14 


21,348,981 24 


9, 553, 340. 01 




675, 107, 574. 00 


344,695,354.30 


22, 634, 500. 75 


1, 042, 437, 429. 05 


180, 514. 00 ! 


j 39, 926. 11 


483; 012. 50 


8, 035,047.50 


513, 884. 00 


9,031,944.00 


9,733,854.61 


39, 926. 11 


675, 590, 586. 50 


352, 730, 401. 80 


23, 148,384. 75 


1,051, 469, 373.05 



Digitized by Google 




204 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XXX VIH.- Coinage of the Mints of the United States 
[C oinage of the mint at New Orleans from its organization, 1838, to 



Calendar years. 



Double- "Kon-lftH Half- Three Quarter- TM\m 

eagles. Eagles- eagles, dollars. eagles. Hollars. Dollars. 



$25,000 41,750 

274.000 82,000 

1,751,020 505,375 

1,187,000 1,823,000 

475.000 205,000 

817,800 200,000 



5,715,000 60,000 



$44, 452. 50 



49, 500. 00 
920,005.00 



310,000.00 




210, 000. 00 ! 14, 000 

205,000 370,000.00 j 290,000 



350,000.00 ; 140,000 



230, 000 !$72, 000 | 382, 500. 00 ! 



52,750.00 




15.000 1 2,887,000 

92.000 5,305,000 



'83,500 | I | 5,708,000 



8,000 ! I 8,725,000 



1885 I 9,185,000 



1887 j [ ! ! 11,550,000 



213,350 12,150,000 



1890 j | I I I 10,701,000 

Total 16,375,500 j 16,490,970 3,7G4,625 j 72, 000 j 3,023,157.50 1, 004, 000 105,590,000 



January l, 1891, to 
June 30, 1891 



Total 16,375,500 16,496,970 ]3, 764, 625 I 72,000 i 3,023,157.50 |l, 004, 000 |ll0,209,913 



* No coinage from 1862 to 1878, inclusive. 

Digitized by ^ 




' 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 205 



FROM THEIR ORGANIZATION, BY CALENDAR YEARS — Continued, 
its suspension, 1861, and from its reopening, 1879, to June 30, 1891.] 



silver — continued. 




' 




Half 


Quarter 




Half Three 


Total gold. 


Total silver. 


Total value. 


dollars. 


dollars. 




dimes. cents. 












$40, 243. 46 




, 


$40, 243. 40 


$40 40 


$8M88 




124, 327. 26 


$54,827.50 


$44,452.50 


260,642.70 


1 305,095.20 


427, 550 


$106, 300 


117, 500. 00 


46,750.00 


217, 500. 00 


698, 100. 00 


915, 600. 00 


200,500 


113,000 


200, 750. 00 


40,750.00 


85,200.00 


555,000.00 


640, 200. 00 


478,500 


192,250 


202, 000. 00 


17,500.00 


405, 500. 00 


890,250.00 


1, 295, 750. 00 


1, 134, 000 


242,000 


15,000.00 




3, 177, 000. 00 


1, 391,000.00 


4,568, 000.00 


1, 002, 500 


185, 000 




11, 000. 00 


3, 010, 000. 00 


1, 198, 500. 00 


4, 208, 500. 00 


1,047, 000 




23, 000. 00 




680,000.00 


1,070, 000.00 


1, 750, 000.00 


1, 152, 000 






* 


1,272, 800.00 


1,211,000.00 


2,483,800.00 


1,292,000 


92, 000 






6,685, 000.00 


1,384,000.00 


7,469,000.00 


1, 590, 000 






30,000.00 


358, 500. 00 


1,620, 000.00 


1,978,500.00 


1,155, 000 




30, 000. 00 


7, 000. 00 


454, 000. 00 


1, 192, 000.00 


1, 646, 000. 00 


1, 228, 000 


103, 000 


51, 600. 00 


34,500.00 


3,619,000.00 


1,456, 500.00 


5, 075, 500. 00 


201,000 


22,000 


40, 000. 00 


43,000.00 $21,600 


9,795,000.00 


327,600.00 


10,122,600.00 


72,000 


24,000 


43, 000. 00 


13,000.00 


4,470,000.00 


152, 000. 00 


4,622,000.00 


664, 000 


333,000 


110, 000. 00 


118,000.00 


2, 220, 000. 00 


1,225,000.00 


3,445,000.00 


2,620,000 


371,000 


177, 000. 00 


78,000.00 


1,274, 500.00 


3, 246, 000. 00 


4, 520, 500. 00 


1, 844, 000 


44,000 




30,000.00 


450, 500.00 


1, 918, 000. 00 


2, 368, 500. 00 


1, 329, 000 


242,000 


118, 000. 00 


55,000.00 


292,750.00 


1,744,000.00 


2,036,750.00 


409, 000 


295,000 


154, 000. 00 


69,000.00 


805,000.00 


927, 000.00 


1,732,000.00 


3, 647, 000 


130,000 


29, 000. 00 


83,000.00 


905, 000. 00 


3,889,000.00 


4, 794, 000. 00 


1,417,000 


65, 000 


48, 000. 00 


28,000.00 


205, 000.00 


1, 918,000.00 


2, 123,000.00 


n 645,000 


97, 000 | 


4, 000.00 


53,000.00 


243, 000. 00 


1, 314, 000. 00 


1, 557, 000. 00 


165,000 








100, 000. 00 


, 165, 000. 00 


265,000.00 










61, 500. 00 


2,887,000.00 


2, 948, 500. 00 










92, 000. 00 


5, 305, 000. 00 


5, 397, 000. 00 










83, 500.00 


5,708,000.00 


5, 791, 500. 00 










108, 200. 00 


6,090,000.00 


6, 198, 200. 00 










8,000.00 


8, 725, 000. 00 


8, 733, 000. 00 










9, 730, 000. 00 


9, 730, 000. 0» 










9, 185, 000. 00 


9,185,000.00 


- 


' 








10,710, 000.00 


10,710,000.00 












11, 550, 000. 00 


11, 550, 000.00 










213, 350. 00 


12, 150, 000. 00 


12, 363, 350. 00 












11, 875,000.00 


11,875,000.00 












10,701,000.00 


10,701,000.00 



23, 801, 538 | 2, 656, 550 1, 526, 820. 60 812, 327.50 , 21,600 40, 736, 252. 50 134, 408, 836. 10 175, 145, 088. 60 

1 : - 1 1 4,619,913.00 4,619,913.00 

23, 801 , 538 : 2, 656, 550 | 1, 526, 820. 60 j 812, 327. 50 | 21, 600 (40, 736, 252. 50 139, 028, 749. 10 179, 765, 001. 60 

- ooQle 



206 REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XXXVII.— Coinage of the Mists of the United States from their Organi- 
zation, by Calendar Years— Continued. 

[Coinage of the mint at Dablonega, Ga., from its organization, 1838, to its suspension, 1861.] 







Gold. 








Half eagles. 


Three dollars. ■ 

1 


1 1 

Quarter eagles. 1 


Dollars. 


Total. 


1838 


$102,915 




i 




$102, 915.00 


1839 


94*095 : 




$34,185.00 




128,880.00 


1840 


114,480 




8, 830. 00 




123, 310.00 


1841 


152, 475 




10, 410.00 


... 


162,885.00 


1842 


298, 040 




11,607.50 




309,647.50 


1843 


492,260 




90,522.50 




582,782.50 


1844 


444, 910 




. 43,330.00 | 




488, 240. 00 


1845 


453, 145 




48,650.00 




501,795.00 


1846 


401,470 




48,257.50 




449,727.50 


1847 


322, 025 


! 


39,460.00 




361,485.00 


1848 


1 237, 325 




34, 427. 50 




271, 752. 50 


1849 


195, 180 




27, 362. 50 


$21,588 


244, 130. 50 


1850 


219, 750 




30, 370. 00 


8,382 


258,502.00 


1851 


313, 550 




28, 160. 00 


9,882 


351, 502. 00 


1852 

1853. 


457,' 260 
448, 390 




10, 195. 00 
7, 945. 00 


6,360 

6,583 


473.815.00 

462. 918. 00 


1854 


282, 065 


$3, 360 


4, 400. 00 


2,935 


292, 760. 00 


1855 

1856 


112, 160 
98, 930 




2, 807. 50 
2, 185. 00 


1, 811 
1,460 


116, 778. 50 
102, 575. 00 


1857 


85, 230 




5, 910. 00 


3,533 


94,673.00 


1858 


76, 810 






3,477 


80, 287. 00 


1859 


51, 830 




5, 610. 00 


4,952 


62, 392.00 


I860 


73, 175 






1,566 


74, 741. 00 


1861 


7, 985 








7,985.00 


Total 


5, 536, 055 


3, 360 


494, 625. 00 


72,529 

1 


6,106,569.00 1 

1 





REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 207 

XXXV III. — Coinage of the Mints of the United States from their Organ- 
izatjeon, by Calendar Years — Continued. 

[Coinage of the mint at Charlotte, N. C., from its organization, 1838, to its suspension, 1861.] 



Gold. 



Half eagles. 



Calendar year 



Total value* 



$64,565 


$19,770.00 




$84,335.00 


117, 335 


-45, 432. 50 


$ 


162,767.50 


95, 140 


32, 095.00 




127, 235. 00 


107,555 


25, 742. 50 




133,297.60 


137, 400 


16,842.50 




154, 242. 50 


221, 765 


65, 240. 00 




287, 005. 00 


118, 155 


29, 055. 00 




147,210.00 



64, 975 12, 020. 00 . 

420, 755 58, 065. 00 . 

322,360 41,970.00 . 

324, 115 25, 550. 00 

317,955 22,870.00 

245, 880 37*307. 50 

362,870 24,430.00 

327,855 

196, 455 18, 237. 50 

198, 940 9, 192. 50 

142, 285 19, 782. 50 . 

156,800 

194, 280 22, 640. 00 . 

150,235 

74, 065 18, 672. 50 . 

34.395 



4,405,135 544,915.00! 



76,995.00 

478.820.00 

364.330.00 

361.299.00 

347.791.00 

324. 454. 50 

396.734.00 

339. 370.00 

214. 696. 50 
. 217, 935. 50 

162, 067. 50 

170.080.00 

216.920.00 

164.470.00 
92, 737. 50 
34.395.00 



5, 059, 188.00 



•Mint burned July 27, 1844* 



Digitized by ^ 











208 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XXXTIII* — Coinage of the Mints of the United States 

[Coinage of the mint at San Francisco 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

prom their Organization, by Calendar Years— Continued. 

from its organization, 1854, to June 30, 1891. 



200 



Half dollars, j $££ 



Dimes. 



Half 

dimes. 



Total gold. 



Total silver. 



Total value. 



164. 975. 00 

105. 500. 00 
79,000. 00 

238. 000. 00 
283, 000; 00 

286.090.00 

469. 750. 00 

076. 000. 00 

458.000. 00.. 

329. 000. Ooj 

337.500.00 

527. 000. 00* 

598. 000. 00 

580.000. 00 
328, 000. 00 
502, 000. 00 . . 

1, 089, 000. 00 
290, 000. 00 

116. 500. 00 

197. 000. 00 ( 

1, 600, 000. Oo! 

[ 

2.264. 000. 00 2, 

2. 678. 000. 00*2, 

6, ooo:oo 



$99, 100. OOj 

71, 500. 00; 

20,500.00! 

I 

30, 250. 00 ! 

20 , 000 . 00 | 

14. 000. Oo! 

! 

24.000. 00 ] 

10, 750. Ooj 



$7, 000. 00] 



5. 000. 00 
10, 250. 00 

7. 000. 00 
12, 000. 00 
24, 000. OOj 
19, 000. 00' 



6 , 000 . 00 ! 
6 , 000 . 00 ; 
14, 000. oo! 
17, 250. 00! 
18, 075. 00! 



7, 725. 00, 
20, 750. OOj 
39, 000.00* 



J 



98.000. 00: 

170, 000. Oo|$231, 000. 00| 

149. 000. Ooj 

249. 000. 00 ( 

35. 000. OOj 



15, 750. 00 


$5, 000. 00 


23,000. 00 


4, 500.00 


17, 500. 00 


• 6,000.00 


13, 500. 00 


6, 000.00 


14, 000.00 


6, 000.00 


26, 000. 00 


14, 000. 00 


45, 000. 00 


11, 500. 00 


5, 000.00 




32, 000. 00 


8, 050. 00 


19,000. 00 


41, 850; 00 


45, 500.00 


16, 200.00 


24, 000. 00 




907, 000. 00 




1, 042, 000. 00 




234, 000. 00 





304, 000.00 



56, 496. 
4, 360. 
20, 652. 
445,445. 
172, 000. 
97,267. 
142, 307. 



$4, 084, 207. 
18, 008, 300. 

25. 306. 400. 

20. 327. 000. 
17, 158, 200. 

13.918. 000. 

11. 178. 000. 

15. 665. 000. 
17, 275, 960. 

19. 543. 400. 
15, 917, 640. 

21.213. 500. 

17. 362. 000. 

18. 720. 000. 

17. 230. 000. 
14, 028, 050. 

19. 848. 000. 

18. 905. 000. 

16.000. 000. 
21, 154, 500. 

24. 460. 000. 

24. 674. 000. 

32. 022. 500. 

35. 092. 000. 
36, 209, 500. 
28, 955,750. 
28, 527, 000. 

29. 085. 000. 
28, 665, 000. 

24. 576. 000. 

20.447.500. 
22, 007, 500. 
24, 600, 000. 
23, 390, 000. 

25. 148. 500. 

19. 748. 000. 

16. 055. 000. 



$164, 075. 

184.000. 
99, 500. 

274, 250. 

329. 000. 

264. 000. 

511. 000. 
710, 825. 
478, 750. 

301. 500. 
371,250. 

553. 500. 

630. 000. 

644.000. 
403, 500. 
507, 000. 

1, 136, 775. 
380, 600. 
920,900. 
2 , 868 , 000 . 
7, 395, 000. 
10, 682, 000. 
OO; 14,680,000. 
13, 977, 000. 

9. 110. 000. 
8, 900, 000. 

12, 760, 000. 

9. 250. 000. 
6, 250, 000. 
3, 256, 496. 
1, 501, 369. 

770,652. 
2, 216,445. 

1. 133. 000. 
797, 207. 

8, 372, 680. 



$4, 084. 207. 00 
OO! 18,172.375.00 

25.490.400.00 

20. 426. 500.00 



00^ 17, 432, 450. 00 



13. 247. 000. 00 

11. 442. 000. 00 

16.176.000. 00 
17,986,785.00' 

20. 022. 150. 00 

16. 279. 140. 00 

21. 584. 750. 00 

17.915. 500.00 

19. 350. 000. 00 

17. 874. 000. 00 

14. 431. 550. 00 

20. 355. 000. 00 

20. 041. 775. 00 

16. 380. 600. 00 

22. 075. 400. 00 
27, 328, 000.00 

32. 069. 000. 00 

42. 704. 500. 00 
49, 772, 000. 00 
50, 186, 500. 00 
38, 065, 750. 00 
37, 427, 000. 00 

41. 845. 000. 00 

37. 915. 000. 00 
30, 826, 000. 00 
23, 703, 996. 90 

23, 508, 869. 00 
25, 370,652.40 
25, 606, 445. 00 
26, 281, 500. 00 
20, 545, 267. 80 

24, 427. 680. 60 



H, 052, 225. 00,5, 445, 825. 00 231, 000. 00 3, 470, 113. 70H19, 100. 00i 



785, 506, 407. 00ll22, 844, 336. 70 908, 350, 743. 70 
69, 611. 60| 13, 240. 000. 00| 5, 089. 611. 60j 18, 329, 611. 60 



14. 052, 225. 00 5. 445. 825. 00 231, 000. 00 3, 539, 725. 301 19, 100. 00,798, 746, 407. OOj 



127, 933, 948. 30 926, G80, 355. 30 



10285 M 14 





210 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

XXXVIII.— Coinage of the Mints of the United States 

[Coinage of the mint at Carson City 





GOLD. 


SILVER. 


Calendar years. 


Double 

eagles. 


Eagles. 


Half 

eagles. 


Dollars. 


Trade 

-dollars. 


1870 


$75, 780 


$59, 080 


$38,375 


$12, 462 




1871 - 


293, 740 


71,850 


103,850 


1, 376 




1872 


593, 000 


55,000 


84,900 


3, 150 




isTa. 


448, 200 


45,430 


37,080 


2,300 


$124,500 


1874 


2, 301, 700 


165, 670 


105,990 




1, 373, 200 


1875 


2, 223j 020 


77, 150 


59, 140 




1,573,700 


1876 


2, 768, 820 


46,960 


34, 435 




509,000 


1877 


851,300 


33,320 


43,400 




534,000 


1878.. 


263, 600 


32,440 


45,270 


2, 212, 000 


97,000 


1879 


214, 160 


17,620 


86, 405 


756,000 




1880 




111,900 


255,085 


591,000 




1881 




240, 150 


69, 430 


296,000 




1882 


782, 800 


67,640 


414, 085 


1, 133,000 




1883 


1, 199, 240 


120,000 


64,790 


1,204,000 




1884 


1,622, 780 


99, 250 


82, 010 


1,136,000 




1885 


189, 000 






228,000 




1886* 













1887* 












' 

1888* I 


1 








1889t 


618,900 






350,000 




1890 


1, 824, 180 


175,000 


269,000 


2, 309, 041 




Total 


16, 270, 220 


1,420,460 


1, 793, 245 


10, 234, 329 


4, 211, 400 


January 1 , 1891, to June 30, 1891 




527, 320 


610,000 


888,000 




Total 


16, 270, 220 


1, 947, 780 


2, 403, 245 


11, 122, 329 


4,211,400 



* Coinage suspended* 



Digitized by 



Google 





REPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. Sill 



FROM THEIR ORGANIZATION, BY CALENDAR YEARS — Continued, 
from its organization, 1870, to J une 30, 1891.] 



SILVER. 


Total gold. 


Total silver. 


Total valub. 


Half 

dollar's. 


Quarter- 

dollars. 


Twenty 

cents. 


Dimes. 


$27, 308. 50 


$2, 085. 00 






$173, 235 


$41, 855.' 50 


$215, 090. 50 


69,975,00 


2, 722. 50 




$2, 010. 00 


469, 440 


76, 083. 50 


545, 523. 50 


136, 000. 00 


2,275.00 




2, 400. 00 


732,900 


143,625. 00 


876, 725. 00 


168, 530. 00 


4,115. 50 




3, 119. 10 


530, 710 


302, 564.60 


833, 274. 60 


29, 500.00 






1, 081. 70 


2, 575, 360 


1, 403, 781. 70 


3, 979, 141.70 


504,000.00 


35, 000. 00 


$26, 656 


464, 500. 00 


2, 359, 310 


, 2,603,858.00 


4,963, 168.00 


$78,000.00 


1, 236, 000. 00 


2,000 


827, 000. 00 


2, 850, 215 


3,552, 000.00 


6,402, 215.00 


710,000.00 


1, 048, 000. 00 




770, 000. 00 


928,020 


3,062,000.00 


3, 990,020.90 


31,000.00 


249, 000. 00 




20, 000. 00 


341, 310 


2, 609, 000. 00 


2, 950, 310. 00 










318, 185 


756, 000. 00 


1, 074, 185. 00 










366, 985 


591,000.00 


957, 985. 00 








309,580 


296, 000. 00 


605,580.00 








1, 264, 525 


1, 133, 000. 00 


2, 397, 525. 00 










1,384,030 


1, 204, 000. 00 


2, 588, 030. 00 










1,804,040 


1, 136, 000. 00 


2, 940, 040. 00 











189, 000 


228, 000. 00 


417, 000. 00 














i 












1 




















618,900 


350, 000. 00 


968, 900. 00 


l 








2, 268, 180 


2, 309, 041. 00 


4, 577i 221. 00 








2, 654, 313. 50 


2, 579, 198. 00 


28, 668 


! 2,090.110.80 


19,483,925 


21, 798, 009. 30 


; 41,281,934.30 








4 


1, 137, 320 


888, 000. 00 


| 2,025,320.00 









1 . 


2,654, 313.50 


2, 579, 198. 00 


28, 658 


2, 090,110. 80 


20,621,245 


22, 686, 009. 30 


43,307,254.30 



t Operations resumed October 1, 1889. 



Digitized by Google 




212 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT, 



XXXVIII.— Coinage of the Mints of the United Stateq 




Digitized by Google 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

FROM THEIR ORGANIZATION, BY CALENDAR YEARS— Continued. 

RECAPITULATION. 



213 



SILVER COINAGE. 



j Trade j 
• dollars. 



Dollars. 



Half dollars. 





$204, 791 
72,920 
7, 776 
327, 536 
423, 515 
220, 920 
54,454 
41,650 
66,064 
19, 570 
321 










V 







































































I 




1 




i 
















j 




1 

! a 




j 


I 


1 


1 


' 












1,000 










300 
61,005 
173,000 
184,618 
165, 100 













$161, 

1 , 



572.00 

959.00 



15, 
14, 

16, 
78, 

105, 

419, 

525, 

684, 

702, 

638, 

601, 

814, 

620, 

519, 



144.50 

945.00 

857.50 

259.50 

861.00 

788.00 

788.00 

300.00 

905.00 

138.00 

822.00 

029.50 
951. 50 

587.50 



23,575.00 

607. 783. 50 

980. 161. 00 

1. 104.000. 00 

375. 561. 00 

652. 898. 50 

779. 786. 50 

847. 100. 00 

1. 752. 477. 00 

1.471. 588.00 
2,002, 090. 00 
2, 746, 700. 00 

1. 537. 600. 00 

1.856.078. 00 

2.382.400.00 
2, 936, £30. 00 

2. 398. 500. 00 

2.603. 000. 00 

3. 206. 002. 00 

2.676.003.00 

3. 273. 100. 00 

1.814. 910.00 

1. 773. 000. 00 

1.748. 768.00 

1.145.054.00 

355. 500. 00 
1, 484, 882. 00 

3. 056. 000. 00 



71. 500. 00 

488.000. 00 

118. 000. 00 

63. 100. 00 

208, 000.00 

122, 786. 50 
153, 331. 75 
143, 000. 00 
214, 250. 00 

403, 400. 00 



Quarter 

dollars. 


Twenty 

cents. 


Dimes. • 


Half 

dimes. 


Three 

cents. 








$4,320.80 
511.50 
2, 226. 35 




$1, 473. 50 
63.00 




$2,213.50 
2, 526. 10 
2, 755. 00 
























2. 176. 00 

3. 464. 00 
1,097.50 

3. 304. 00 
826.50 

12, 078. 00 


1,200.00 

1.695.50 
650.50 

1. 892. 50 






















1, 684. 50 
30, 348. 50 
51, 531. 00 
55,160. 75 










780.00 












16,500.00 


















4.471.00 
635.50 

6. 518. 00 















































42, 150. 00 






17, 308. 00 
5, 000. 75 








- 
















90,293.50 
36, 000.00 
31, 861. 00 
54, 212. 75 
16,020.00 
4, 450. 00 




















94,258.70 

118,651.20 

10,000.00 

44,000.00 




















! 










42, 000. 00 | 




51, 000. 00 

i 






I 

i 






1, 000. 00 
25, 500. 00 | 
i 





121, 500. 00 
12, 500. Ob 

77. 000. 00 

51. 000. 00 

77.135.00 ! 

52.250.00 

48.400.00 | 














| 61,600.00 
62,000.00 
i 62,135.00 
48,250.00 
> 68,500.00 




1 


1 




99,500.00 i 
80, 000. 00 | 
39,000.00 i 






1 




! j 





63, 500.00 

141.000. 00 

119. 000. 00 

104. 200. 00 
239,493.40 
229, 638. 70 

253.858.00 

363. 000. 00 

390. 750. 00 

152.000. 00 



74.000. 00 ! 

138,000.00 

95.000. 00 

113. 800. 00 

112. 750. 00 

108.285.00 
113,954.25 

98.250.00 

58. 250. 00 

58, 250. 00 



Digitized by 



Google 




214 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

XXX VIII.— Coinage of Tire Mixts of the United States 



RECAPITULATION. 





- 




GOLD- COINAGE. 








Calendar year. 


Double 

eagles. 


Eagles. 


Half eagles. 


Three 

dollars. 


Quarter 

eagles. 


Dollars. 


* 


1844 




$1,250, 610 


$4, 087, 715 




$89, 345. 00 






1845 




736, 530 


2, 743. 640 




276, 277. 50 






1846 




1, 018, 750 


2, 736, 155 




279, 272. 50 






1847 







14, 337, 580 


5. 382, 685 





482, 060. 00 






1848: 




1, 813, 340 


1,863,560 




98, 612. 50 






1849 




6, 775, 180 


1, 184, 645 




111, 147. 50 


$936, 789 




1860 


$26, 225, 220 


3, 489, 510 


860, 160 




895, 547. 50 


511,301 


- 


1851 


48, 043, 100 


4, 393, 280 


2, 651, 955 




3, 867, 337. 50 


3, 658, 820 




1852 


44. 860, 520 


2, 811, 060 


3, 689, 635 




3, 283, 827. 50 


2, 201, 145 




1853 


26. 646, 520 


2, 522, 530 


2, 305, 095 




3, 519, 615. 00 


4, 384, 149 




1854 


18, 052, 340 


2, 305, 760 


1, 513, 235 


$491, 214 


1,896,397.50 


1, 657, 016 




1855 


25, 046, 820 


1, 487, 010 


1, 257, 090 


171, 465 


600, 700. 00 


824,883 




1856 


30, 437, 560 


1, 429, 900 


1, 806, 665 


181, 530 


1, 213, 117. 50 


1,788, 996 






28, 797, 500 


481, 060 


1, 232, 970 


104, 673 


796, 235.00 


801,602 




1858 


21, 873, 480 


343, 210 


439, 770 


6,399 


144, 082. 50 


131, 472 




1859 


13, 782, 840 


253,930 


361, 235 


46, 914 


142, 220. 00 


193,431 




I860.. 


22, 584, 400 


278, 830 


352, 365 


42, 465 


164, 360. 00 


51,234 




1861 


71. 989, 060 


1, 287, 330 


3, 332, 130 


18, 216 


3, 241, 295. 00 


527,499 




1862 


18, 926, 120 


234, 950 


69,825 


17, 355 


300, 882. 50 


1, 326, 865 




1863... , 


22, 187, 200 


112, 480 


97,360 


15, 117 


27, 075. 00 


6,250 




1864 


19,958,900 


60,800 


40, 540 


8,040 


7, 185. 00 


5,950 




1865 


27, 874, 000 


207, 050 


144, 535 


3,495 


62, 302. 50 


3,725 




1866 


30, 820, 500 


237, 800 


253, 200 


12, 090 


105, 175. 00 


7,180 




1867 


23, 436, 300 


121, 400 


179,600 


7,950 


78, 125. 00 


5, 250 




1868 


18, 722, 000 


241,550 


288,625 


14,625 


94, 062. 50 


10, 525 




1809 


17, 238, 100 


82,850 


163,925 


7, 575 


84, 612. 50 


5,925 




187U 


22, 819, 480 


164, 430 


143, 550 


10, 605 


51, 387. 50 


9, 335 




1871 


20, 456, 740 


254,650 


245,000 


3,990 


08, 375. 00 


3,930 




1872 


21, 230, 600 


244,500 


275,350 


6,090 


52, 575. 00 


3,530 i 




1873 


55, 456,700 


173, 680 


754,605 


75 


'512,562.50 


125,125 i 




1871 


33, 917, 700 


799, 270 


203,530 


125, 400 


9, 850. 00 


198,820 | 




1875 


32, 737,820 


78, 350 


105, 240 


60 


30, 050. 00 


420 j 




1876 


46, 386,920 


104,280 


61,820 


135 


23, 052. 50 


3,245 J 




1877 


* 43, 504, 700 


211,490 


182, 660 


4,464 


92, 630. 00 


3,920 : 




1878 


45, 916, 500 


1,031,440 


1,427,470 


246,972 


1,160,650.00 


3,020 , 




1879 


28, 889, 260 


6, 120, 320 


3, 727, 155 


9,090 


331, 225. 00 


3,030 




1880 


17, 749, 120 


21, 715, 160 


22, 831, 765 


% 108 


7,490.00 


1, 636 




3881 


14,585,200 


48, 796, 250 


33, 458, 430 


1,650 


1,700.00 


7,660 




1882 


23,295,400 


24, 740, 640 


17, 831, 885 


4,620 


10, 100. 00 


5,040 




1883..... 


24,980,040 


2,595,400 


1, 647, 990 


2,820 


4,900.00 


10, 840 




1884 


19, 944, 200 


2, 110, 800 


1, 922, 250 


3, 318 


4, 982. 50 


6,200 




1885 


13, 875, 560 


4, 815, 270 


9,065, 030 


2, 730 


2,217.50 


12,205 




1886 


22, 120 


10, 621, 600 


18, 282, 160 


3, 426 


10,220.00 


6,016 




1887 


5, 662, 420 


8, 706, 800 


9, 560, 435 


18, 480 


15, 705. 00 


8,543 




1888 


21, 717, 320 


8, 030, 310 


1, 560, 980 


15, 873 


40, 245. 00 


16,080 




1889 


16, 995, 120 


4,298,850 


37, 825 


! 7,287 


44, 120. 00 


30, 729 




1890 


19,399, 080 


755,430 


290, 640 




22,032.50 






Total 


1, 090, 044, 480 


201,188,600 


: 191, 086, 650 


M19, 376 


28,561,472.50 ! 


! 19,499,337 




January 1, 1891, to June 






i j 




i 






30, 1891 


13,248,500 : 


984,870 


! 618,105 ! 




8, 857. 50 ! 






Total 


'1, 103, 292, 980 \ 

1 i 


202, 173, 470 


i 191,704,755 

1 


1,619,376 , 

i i 


28, 570, 330. 00 i 
1 


19,499,337 

i 


: 










Digitized by OCK^L0 


- A-k , - 






t 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

FROM THEIR ORGANIZATION, BY CALENDAR YEARS — Continued. 

recapitulation! / 



215 



8ILVBB COINAGE. 



Trade 

dollars. 



Dollars. 



Half dollars. 



Quarter 

dollars. 


Twenty 

cents. 


$290,300.00 


imm 


230,500.00 


mm 


127, 500.00 




275, 500. 00 




36,500.00 




85,000.00 




150, 700. 00 




62, 000.00 




68,265.00 




4,146,^55.00 




3, 466, 000. 00 




857, 350. 00 




2, 129, 500. 00 




2, 726, 500. 00 




2, 002, 250. 00 
421, 000. 00 






312,350.00 




1,237,650.00 




249, 887. 50 




48,015.00 




28, 517. 50 




25,075.00 




11, 381. 25 




17, 156.25 




31,500.00 




23,150.00 




23,935.00 




53,255.50 




68,762.50 




414,190.50 




215,975.00 




1,278,375.00 


$265,598 


7,839,287.50 


5,180 


6,024,927.50 


102 


849, 200.00 


120 


3, 675.00 




3,738.75 




3,243.75 




4075.00 




3, 859. 75 




2,218.75 




3,632.50 




1, 471. 50 




2,677.50 




306,708. 25 




3, 177. 75 




20,147.50 




38, 854 412. 50 


271,000 


175,087.50 




39, 029,500.00 





Dimes. 



Half dimes. 


Three 

cents. 


$32,500.00 




78, 200. 00 




1,350.00 




63, 700. 00 




63, 400.00 




72, 450. 00 




82,250.00 




82,050.00 


$185,022.00 


63,025.00 


559, 905. 00 


785, 251. 00 


342, 000.00 


365,000.00 


20, 130. 00 


117, 500. 00 


4, 170. 00 


299, 000.00 


43, 740. 00 


433, 000.00 


31, 260. 00 


258,000.00 


48, 120. 00 


45.000.00 


10. 950. 00 


92,950.00 


8, 610. 00 


| 164,050.00 


14940.00 


74 627. 50 


10, 906.50 


5,923.00 


643.80 


4,523*50 


14. 10 


6,675.00 


255.00 


6,536.25 


681.75 


6,431.25 


138.75 


18,295.00 


123.00 


21,930.00 


153.00 


26, 830. 00 


120.00 


82, 493.00 


127.80 


189,247.50 


58.50 


51, 830. 00 


18.00 



$20,000 

24.500 
109,000 
140.750 

15.000 

02.000 

47.500 
1, 300 
1,100 

40,110 

33,140 

20,000 

03.500 
94,000 



1,225,000 
U 910, 000 
0, 279, 000 
6, 192, 150 
13,092,710 
4*259,900 
1,541 
1,987 
900 
1,097 
979 



630,500 
733,930 
78,500 
12.090 
27,600 
31,170 
47,000 
49,625 
00,325 
182,700 
424,300 
445,462 
1,117, 136 
1,118,600 
296,600 



22,495,550 

27.500.100 
27, 397, 355 
27,927,975 

27.574.100 
28, 470, 039 
28,130,875 
28, 697,767 
31, 423, 886 
33,611,710 
31,990,833 
34,651,811 
38,043,004 



$1, 885, 500. 00 
1, 341, 500. 00 

2. 257. 000. 00 

1.870. 000. 00 

1. 880. 000. 00 

1.781.000. 00 

1.341.500.00 

301. 375.00 

110.565.00 

2. 430. 354. 00 
4, 111, 000. 00 

2.288.725.00 

1. 903. 500. 00 

1.482.000. 00 

5. 998. 000. 00 

2.074.000. 00 

1.032.850.00 

2. 078. 950. 00 

802. 175. 00 

709. 830. 00 

518.785.00 

593.450.00 

899. 812. 50 

810. 162. 50 

769. 100. 00 

725.950.00 

829.758.50 

1.741.655.00 

866.775.00 

1.593.780.00 

1.406.650.00 

5.117.750.00 

7.451.575.00 

7. 540. 255.00 

728.200.00 

2.950.00 

4.877.50 

5.487.50 

2.750.00 

4. 519. 50 

2. 637. 50 

3.065.00 

2.943.00 

2.855.00 
$416.50 

6.355.50 

6. 295.00 



$7,250.00 
198, 50Q. 00 

3. 130. 00 

24.500.00 

45.150.00 

113. 900. 00 

244.150.00 

142.650.00 

196.550.00 

1. 327.301.00 

624. 000. 00 

207.500.00 

703. 000. 00 

712.000. 00 

189.000. 00 
97,000.00 

78.700.00 

209.650.00 

102. 830. 00 

17. 196. 00 

26. 907. 00 
18, 550.00 

14.372.50 

14.662.50 

72.625.00 

70. 660. 00 
52, 150.00 

109.371.00 

261.045.00 
443, 329.10 

319. 151.70 

2.406.570.00 

3.015.115.00 

1.735.051.00 

187. 880.90 

1. 510. 00 

3.735.50 

2.497.50 

391.110.00 
767,571.20 
393, 134 90 

257.711.70 
658,409.40 

1,573,838.90 

721. 648. 70 

835. 338. 90 
1,133,461.70 



35,965,924 



396,012,243 



17, 678, 263 



122, 834, 835. 00 



76,575.00 



23, 645, 815. 30 



702. 646. 60 



[4880,219.40 1,282,087.20 



35,965,9^4 ^413, 690, 506 j 122, 911, 410. 00 



24,348,461.90 ;4, 880, 219.40 1,282,087.20 



Digitized by 






216 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 










REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE HINT. 



217 



FROM THEIR ORGANIZATION, BY CALENDAR YEARS— Continued. 

RECAPITULATION. 



MINOR COINAGE. 


TOTAL COINAGE. 


Cents. 


Half cents. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Minor. 


Total. 


' $10, 660. 33 


$712.67 


$71,485.00 


$370,683.80 


$11,373.00 


$453,541.80 


0,747.00 


577.40 


77, 960. 00 


77, 118. 50 


10,344.40 


165,402.90 


8,075. 10 


535.24 


128, 190. 00 


14, 550. 45 


9,510.34 


152,250.70 


0,707.00 




205, 610. 00 


330, 291. 00 


9,797.00 


545,698.00 


0,045.85 


60.83 


213, 285. 00 


423, 515. 00 


9, 106. 68 


645,906.68 


28,221.75 


1,057.65 


317, 760. 60 


224, 296.00 


29,279.40 


571,335.40 


13,628.37 




422, 570. 00 


74,758.00 


13,628.37 


510,956.37 


34,351.00 


71.83 


423,310.00 


58, 343. 00 


34,422.83 


516,075.83 


24,713.53 


480. 50 


258, 377. 50 


87, 118.00 


25, 203. 03 


370,698.53 


7, 568. 38 


4, 276. 56 


258, 642. 50 


100, 340. 50 


12,844.94 


371, 827.94 


0, 411. 16 


4, 072. 32 


170, 367. 50 


149, 388. 50 


13,483.48 


333,239.48 


3, 480. 00 


1, 780. 00 


324, 505. 00 


471, 319. dO 


5,260.00 


801, 064.00 


7,272.21 


2, 380. 00 


437, 495. 00 


597, 448. 75 


9,652.21 


1,044,595.96 


11,000.00 


2, 000.06 


284, 665. 00 


684, 300. 00 


13, 090. 00 


982,055.00 


2,228.67 


5,772.86 


169,375.00 


707, 376. 00 


8,001.53 


884,752.53 


14, 585. 00 


1, 075. 00 


501, 435. 00 


638, 773. 50 


15, 660. 00 


1,155,868.50 


2,180.25 


315. 70 


497, 905. 00 


608,340.00 


2,495.95 


1,108,740.95 


10,755.00 




290,435.00 


814, 029. 50 


10,755.00 


1, 115,219.50 


4, 180. 00 





477, 140. 00 


620, 951. 50 


4,180.00 


1, 102, 27L 50 


3, 578. 30 





77, 270. 00 


561, 687. 50 


.3, 578. 30 


642,535.80 






3, 175. 00 


17 308 00 




20 483 00 


28, 200. 82 




28, 575. 75 


2S 209.82 


56 785 57 


30, 484. 00 






607, 783. 50 


99 484 00 


647 267 SO 


31,670.00 


* 


242, 940. 00 


1, 070, 454. 50 


31,670.00 


1,845,064.50 


26, 710.00 




258, 615. 00 


1, 140, 000. 00 


26,710.00 


1,425,325.00 


44.075.50 




1, 319, 030. 00 


501, 680. 70 


44, 075. 50 


1, 864, 786. 20 


3,800.00 




189, 325. 00 


825,762.45 


3, 890. 00 


1,018,977. 45 


20,723.30 




88, 980. 00 


805, 806. 50 


20,723.39 


915,509.89 




* 


72, 425. 00 


895, 550. 00 




967, 975. 00 


12,620.00 




93, 200.00 


1,752,477.00 


12, 620. 00 


1,858, 297.00 


14, 611.00 


315.00 


156, 385. 00 


1, 564, 583. 00 


14,926.00 


1,735,894.00 


15, 174. 25 


1, 170. 00 


92,245.00 


2,002,090.00 


16, 344. 25 


2, 110, 679. 25 


23, 577. 32 




131,565.00 


2, 869, 200. 00 


23,577.32 


3, 024, 342. 32 


22,606.24 


3,030.00 


140, 145. 00 


1, 575, 600. 00 


25,636.24 


1,741,381.24 


14,145.00 


2,435.00 


295, 717. 50 


1,994,578.00 


16, 580.00 


2, 306, 875. 50 


17, 115.00 




643, 105. 00 


2, 495, 400. 00 


17,115.00 


3, 155,620.00 


33,502.60 


11.00 


714,270.00 


3,175,600.00 


33,603.60 


3,923,473.60 


23,620.00 




798, 435. 00 


2,579,000.00 


23,620.00 


3,401,055.00 


27,300.00 


770.00 


978, 550. 00 


2,759, 000.00 


28,160.00 


3,765,710.00 


18, 551. 00 


600.00 


3, 954, 270. 00 


3,415, 002.00 


19, 151. 00 


7, 388,423.00 


38,784.00 


705.00 


2,186,175.00 


3, 443, 003. 00 


39,489.00 


5,668,667.00 


21,110.00 


1,990.00 


4,135,700.00 


3, 606, 100. 00 


23,100.00 


7,764,900.00 


55, 583.00 




1, 148, 305. 00 


2, 096, 010. 00 


55,583.00 


3,299,898.00 


63,702.00 




1,809, 765.00 


2, 333, 243. 40 


63,702.00 


4,206,710.40 


31, 286. 61 




1,376, 847.50 


2, 209, 778. 20 


31,286.61 


3,617,912.31 


24, 627.00 




1,675, 482.50 


1, 726, 703. 00 


24,627.00 


3,426,812.60 


15, 073. 67 




1, 091, 857. 50 


1, 132, 750. 00 


15,973.67 


2,240,581.17 


23,833.00 




1,829, 407.50 


2,332,750.00 


23,433.90 


4,185,991.40 


24,283.20 




8, 108,797.50 


3,834,750.00 


24,283.20 


11,967,830.70 



t 



Digitized by 



Google 




218 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XXXVIII. — Coinage of the Mints of the United States 
RECAPITULATION. 



Calendar years. 


MINOR COINAGE. 


Five cents. 


Three cent*. 


Two cents. 


1844 








1845 








1846 








1847 








1848 









1849 






• 


1850 








1851 








1852 






i 


1853 






1 


1854 






j 


1855 






i 


1856 






i 


1857 




* 


j 


1858 








1859 






j 


1860 








1861 








1802 i i 






1863 _ 1 ! 






1864 






$396, 950. 00 
272, 800. 00 

63.540.00 

58.775.00 

56.075.00 

30.930.00 

17. 225. 00 

14. 425. 00 
1,300.00 


1865 




$341,460.00 
144,030.00 
117, 45Q. 00 

97.560.00 

48.120.00 

40.050.00 

18. 120.00 

25.860.00 

35. 190. 00 

23.700.00 

6.840.00 

4. 860.00 


1866 


$737, 125. 00 
1, 545,475.00 
1, 440, 850. 00 

819. 750.00 

240. 300. 00 
28, 050.00 

301.800.00 
227, 500.00 

176. 900. 00 

104. 850. 00 
126, 500.00 


1867 


1808 


1869 


1870 


1871 


1872 


1873 


1874 . 




1875 




1876 




1877...* 




1878 


117.50 
1, 455. 00 
997. 75 
3, 618, 75 
573, 830. 00 
1, 148, 471. 05 
563, 697. 10 
73, 824. 50 
166, 514. 50 

763. 182. 60 
536,024.15 
794, 068. 05 

812. 963. 60 


70.50 
1, 236. 00 
748.65 
32, 417. 25 
759.00 
318.27 
169.26 

143.70 

128.70 

238.83 
1,232.49 

646.83 




1879 




1880 




1881 




1882 . 




1883 




1884 




1885 




1886 




1887 




1888 




1889 




1890 




Total 






11, 187, 864. 55 
333, 370.00 


941, 349.48 


912,020.00 


January 1, 1891, to June 30, 1891 


Total 






11,521,234.55 


941, 349. 48 


912,020.00 





Digitized by C^ooQle 









REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 
FROM THEIR ORGANIZATION, BY CALENDAR YEARS— Continued. 

RECAPITULATION. 



219 



MINOR COINAGE. 




TOTAL COINAGE. 




Cents. 


Half cents. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Minor. 


Total. 


$23, 987. 52 




$5, 427, 670. 00 


$2, 235. 550. 00 


$23, 987. 52 


$7, 687, 207. 52 


,38,948.04 




3, 756, 447. 50 


1, 873, 200. 00 


38, 948. 04 


5, 668, 595. 54 


41, 208. 00 




4, '034, 177. 50 


2, 558, 580, 00 


41, 208. 00 


6, 633, 965. 50 


61, 836. 69 




20, 202, 325. 00 


2,374,450.00 


61, 836. 69 


22, 638, 611. 69 


64, 157. 99 




3, 775, 512. 50 


2, 040, 050. 00 


64, 157, 99 


5, 879, 720. 49 


41,785.00 


$199. 32 


9, 007, 761. 50 


2, 114, 950. 00 


41, 984. 32 


11, 164, 695. 82 


44, 268, 44 


199.06 


81, 981, 738. 50 


1, 866, 100. 00 


44,467. 50 


33,892, 306. 00 


98, 897. ‘>7 


738. 36 


62,614.492. 50 


774; 397. 00 


99, 635. 43 


63, 488, 524. 93 


50, 630. 94 




56, 846, 187. 50 


999, 410. 00 


50, 630. 94 


57, 896, 228. 44 


66, 411. 31 , 


' 648. 47 


39. 377, 909. 00 


9, 077, 571. 00 


67, 059. 78 


48, 522, 539. 78 


42, 361. 56 


276. 79 


25, 915, 962. 50 


8, 619,270.00 


42, 638. 35 


34, 577, 870. 85 


15, 748. 29 


" 282.50 


29, 387, 968. 00 


3, 501, 245. 00 


16, 030. 79 


32, 905, 243. 79 


26. 904. 63 


202. 15 


36, 857, 768. 50 


5, 142, 240. 00 


27, 106. 78 


42, 027, fl5. 28 


177, 834. 56 


175. 90 


32, 214, 040. 00 


5,478, 760.00 


178, 010. 46 


37, 870, 810. 46 


246, 000. 00 




22, 938, 413. 50 


8, 495, 370. 00 


246, 000.00 


31,679,783.50 


364, 000. 00 




14, 78 ), 570. 00 


3, 284,450.00 


364, 000. 00 


18, 429, 020. 00 


205, 660. 00 




23, 473, 654. 00 


2, 259, 390. 00 


205, 660. 00 


25, 938,704.00 


101, 000. 00 




83, 395, 530. 00 


3, 783, 740. 00 


101, 000. 00 


87, 280, 270. 00 


280,750.00 




20, 875, 997: 50 


1, 252, 516. 50 


280,750.00 


22, 409, 264. 00 


498,400.00 




22, 445, 482. 00 


809, 267. 80 


498, 400. 00 


23, 753, 149. 80 


529, 737. 14 




20, 081, 415.00 


609, 917. 10 


926, 687. 14 


21, 618, 019. 24 


354, 292. 86 





28, 295, 107. 50 


691, 005. 00 


968, 552. 86 


29, 954, 665. 36 


98, 265. 00 


. 


31, 435, 945. 00 


982,409.25 


1, 042, 960. 00 


33, 461,314. 25 


98, 210.00 




23, 828, 625. 00 


908, 876. 25 


1, 819, 010. 00 


26, 557, 411. 25 


102, 665. 00 




19, 371, 387. 50 


1, 074, 343. 00 


1, 697, 150. 00 


22, 142, 880. 50 


64, 200. 00 




17,582,987.50 


1, 266, 143. 00 


963, 000.00 


19, 812, 130. 50 


52, 750. 00 




23,198,787.59 


1, 378, 255. 50 


350, 325. 00 


24, 927, 368. 00 


39, 205. 00 




21, 032, 685. 00 


3, 104, 038. 30 


99, 890. 00 


24, 236, 613. 30 


40, 420. 00 




21,812,645.00 


* 2, 504, 488. 50 


369, 380. 00 


24, 686, 513. 50 


116, 765. 00 




57, 022, 747. 50 


4, 024, 747. 60 


379, 455. 00 


61, 426, 950. 10 


141, 875. 00 




35, 254, 630. 00 


6,851,776.70 


342, 475. 00 


42,448, 881. 70 


' 135, 280. 00 




32, 951, 940. 00 


15,347,893.00 


246, 970. 00 


48, 546, 803. 00 


• 79,440.00 ! 

8,525.00 
57, 998. 50 




40, 579, 452. 50 

43. 999. 864. 00 

49.786.052.00 


24.503. 307.50 

28. 393. 045. 50 
28, 518, 850. 00 


210, 800.00 
8, 525. 00 
58, 186. 50 


71,293,560.00 
72,401,434.50 
| 78, 363, 088. 50 


162, 312. 00 
389, 649. 55 




39, 080, 080. 00 
62,308,279.00 


27, 569, 776. 00 
27,411,693.75 


165, 003. 00 
391, 395. 95 


66, 814, 859. 00 
90, 111,368. 70 


392, 115. 75 




96,850,890.00 


27,940, 163. 75 


428, 151.75 


125, 219, 205. 50 


385,811.00 




65, 887, 685. 00 


27, 973, 132. 00 


960, 400. 00 


94, 821,217.00 


455, 981. 09 , 


1 1 


29, 241, 990. 00 


29. 246, 968. 45 


1,604,770.41 


1 60,093,728.86 


232,017.42 
117, 653. 84 


l 


23. 991. 756. 50 

27.773.012.50 


28, 534, 866. 15 
28, 962, 176. 20 


. 796,483,78 

191, 622. 04 


! 53, 323, 106. 43 

56,926,810.74 


176, 542. 90 
452,264.83 




28.945.542.00 

23.972.383.00 


32, 086, 709. 90 
35,191,081.40 , 


343, 186. 10 
1, 215, 686. 26 


61, 375, 438. 00 
60, 379, 150. 66 


374, 944. 14 




31,380,808.00 


33, 025, 606. 45 


912, 200.78 


65, 318, 615. 23 


488,693.61 




21,413,931.00 


‘ 25,496,683.15 


1, 283,408.49 


58, 194, 022. 64 


571, 828. 54 


i 


20,467,182.50 


39,202,908.20 


1, 384, 792. 14 


61, 054, 882. 84 


9, 553, 340. Cl 


; 39, 926. 11 


1,531,999,915.50 


623,746,536.40 


22,634, 500. 75 | 


2, 178, 380, 952. 65 


180, 514. 00 




14, 860, 332. 50 1 


18,632,572.10 

i 


513,884.00 


34, 006, 788. 60 


9,733,854.61 


39,926.11 

1 


1,546,860,248.00 


642, 379, 108. 50 


23, 148, 384. 75 


| 2,212,387,741.25 



Yi 



a 



74 



*0 



AO 



Digitized by 



Google 



220 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



XXXIX.— MONETARY STATISTICS OF FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 

[For interrogatories addressed to the representatives of the United States in foreign countries see 

page 120 of this report.] 

TRANSCRIPTS. 



GREAT BRITAIN. 
Answers to interrogatories— 1890. 
(1) Gold Coined. 

Sovereigns 

Half sovereigns 

Total 



£0,558,550 
1, 121, 600 



7,680,156 



Light Gold Recoined. 

Imperial British coin only— 

Pre-Victorian 

Victorian 

Total 



£2, 275, 000 
973, 437 



3,248, 437 



(2) Silver Coined. 



Crowns £244, 332 

Double florins 156, 420 

Half crowns 414, 073 

Florins 168, 498 

Shillings 436,788 

Sixpences 234, 630 

Fourpences 69 

Threepences 57, 278 

Twopences 40 

Pence 33 



Total 1,712,161 



Worn Imperial silver coin withdrawn from circulation in 1890 (nominal value), £296,896 15*. 2d. 

(3) Import and Export of Gold. 



Imports: 
Coin ... 
Bullion 
Ore .... 



£13, 172, 546 
10,395,504 
38, 079 



Exports : 
Coin ... 
Bullion 
Ore 



(4) Import and Export of Silver. 



£10, 804, 709 
3, 501,979 
2,938 



Imports: 
Coin ... 
Bullion 
Ore. ... 



£3, 701, 808 
6, 683, 851 
2, 637, 232 



Exports : 
Coin ... 
Bullion 
Ore — 



£2, 257, 824 
8, 605, 560 
126, 511 



(5) Gold Produced from Mines in the United Kingdom in 1890. 



Weight kilograms . . 6. 407 • 

Value £675 



(6) Sh.vkr Produced from Mines in the United Kingdom in 1890. 



Weight kilograms. . 9, 071. 087 

Value £58,024 



(7) Gold Coin in the United Kingdom on December 31, 1890. 

Estimated: 

Sovereigns £82, 000, 000 

Half sovereigns 23, 000, 000 

Total .* 105, 000, 000 

No estimates of the stock of gold bullion are available. 

(8) Silver coin iu the United Kingdom on December 31, 1890, estimated, £22,000,000. 
No estimates of the stock of silver bullion are available. 

(9) Note circulation of the United Kingdom on December 31, 1890, £40,962,791. 

(10) A royal proclamation, of which a copy is inclosed, was issued in November 
last, under the authority of section h of the coinage act, 1870, calling in all gold coins 

Digitized by Google 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 221 



issued before the present reign. Under this proclamation these coins ceased to be 
legal tender on the 28th of February, 1891. 

(11) The annual report of the deputy master of the mint for 1890 has not yet been 
issued, but copies will be sent to the Director of the Mint, Washington, in due 
course, as in previous years. 

April 10, 1891. 



By the Queen. 

A PROCLAMATION. 

Victoria, R. 

Whereas by “the coinage act, 1870,” we are empowered, with the advice of our 
privy council, by proclamation, to call in coins of any date or denomination or any 
coins coined before the date in such proclamation mentioned; 

And whereas by “the coinage act, 1889,” it was provided that any gold coin of 
the realm coined before our reign which should be below the least eurrent weight, 
as provided by “ the coinage act, 1870,” might, within the time and in the manner 
from time to time directed by us in council, be tendered for exchange, and if it had 
not been illegally dealt with should be exchanged or paid for by or on behalf of the 
mint at its nominal value j 

And whereas we, by orders in council made pursuant to “ the coinage act, 1JJ89,” 
on the thirteenth day of December, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-nine, and 
eighth day of February, one thousand eight hundred and ninety, ordered that the 
time within which any coin mentioned in section one of “ the coinage act, 1889,” might 
be tendered for exchange should be the thirty -first day of March, one thousand eight 
hundred and ninety, and in the manner in the said orders respectively mentioned; 

And whereas a large number of gold coins coined before our reign have been so 
exchanged or paid for, and a few only remain in circulation, and it is expedient to 
call in all such coins : 

Now, therefore, we do, with the advice of our privy council and in pursuance of 
“ the coinage act, 1870,” and of all other powers enabling us in this behalf by this 
our royal proclamation, call in by the twenty-eighth day of February, one thousand 
eight hundred and ninety-one, all gold coins of the realm coined before our reign, 
and declare and command that, from and after such twenty-eighth day of February, 
one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one, such coins shall not be current or legal 
tender within our United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. 

Given at our court at Windsor, this twenty-second day of November, in the year 
of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety, and in the fifty-fourth year of 
our reign. 

God save the Queen. 



London, May 26, 1891 . 

Dear Sir : I beg to acknowledge receipt of your report on the production of the 
precious metals, which I have read with interest. 

Herewith I have much pleasure in giving you some statistics of the imports of 
silver ore into the United Kingdom last year and of the imports of gold bullion 
and coin from certain districts, whioh may prove useful to you. 

I remain, yours truly, 

A. Sauerbeck. 

Edward O. Leech, Esq., 

Director of the Mint . 



Imports of Silver Ore into the United Kingdom, 1890. 



Countries from — 


Value. 


Countries from — 


Value. 




£150, 513 
15, 584 
6,921 
2,660 
226,350 
2,830 
99, 659 


Mexico 


£41, 308 
35,909 
28,678 
411,076 
7,551 
1,342,506 
6,526 








Peru. 


Portn ff ivl 


Chile 




Argentine Republic 


Ttalv 


Australasia 


- - 


Other countries 


TtjrlteY 


10,657 
248, 504 




United Strtt**% ... - . r . 


Total 


2,637,232 







Digitized by Google 



222 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Imports of Gold Bullion and Coin into United Kingdom, 1890. 
GOLD BULLION. 



Countries frortf— 


1886. 


1887. 


1888. 


1889. 


1890. 


British South Africa 

British India...... 


Ounces. 
35, 143 
118, 713 
152, 678 
34,387 


Ounces. 
56, 762 
28. 072 
162,964 
36, 108 


Ounces. 
214,283 
61,520 
' 103,019 
37,948 


Ounces. 
356,038 
82,130 
62,058 
44, 554 


Ounces . 
480,144 
107,548 
37,063 
37,242 


Chinn 


West coast Africa 



GOLD COIN. 



British Africa I 34,255 1 3,146 

British India ...I 43,876 5,569 

China 144,224 106,650 

West coast Africa 1, 119 j 2, 085 



4,073 
5, 187 
166,688 


13, 454 | 


91,305 







1,789 

10,043 

29,609 

1,708 



AUSTRALASIA. 



Melbourne, January 9 , 1891 . 

Sir : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of vour letter dated October 31, 
last, asking me to inform you, approximately, by cable, early in February, of the 
estimated quantity of gold and silver produced in Australia and New Zealand during 
the year 1890. 

I have communicated with the mining departments of the various colonies, notify- 
ing to them your wish to have this early information. 

I will, as you request, cable to yon early in February the information I may have 
received, although I am in doubt as to whether the information will then be very 
complete. 

I have the honor to be, sir, yotir obedient servant, 

Georgs Anderson. 

The Director of the Mint, 

Washington , United States . 

[Cablegram.] 



February 12, 1891 . 

Approximate estimate of the product of gold and silver in Australasia during the 
calendar year 1890 : 



Ounces. 

Gold 1,572,000 

Silver : 10,030,000 



Royal Mint, Melbourne, June 5, 1891. 

Sir: 

####«*• 

I inclose the final returns (stated in gross ounces, as usual) of the 
gold and silver estimated to have been produced in Australasia during 
1890, which tfas only able to give you approximately by telegram of 
February 12, last, through the consul-general for the United States here. 
You will observe a difference between the telegram and this return in 
the manner of expressing the silver production. The telegram stated 
the production of silver to be about 10,030,000 ounces, and was based 
on a telegram received from the mining department of NTew South 
Wales to that effect. The final return since received from that depart- 
ment indicates that the greater part of that silver was contained in 
silver lead and silver ore which was shipped to Europe for treatment 



Digitized by Google 





REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 2£3 

there. The footnote (*) to the return now forwarded will make this 
clear to you. 

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, 

Gjsorge Anderson. 

The Director of the Mint, 

Washington, D. 0. 



Estimated Production of Gold and Silver in Australia, Tasmania, and New 
ZEALAND, DURING THE YEAR 1890, FROM RETURNS KINDLY FORWARPED BY THE 

Government of Each Colony. 



Country. 


Gold. 


Silver. 




Ounces. 
127,460 
193, 193 
610, 587 
+24, 831 
20, 510 
588,560 
34, 209 


Ounces. 
*496, 552 
32,627 
(1) 




Queensland 


Sont.h A u strati a 


Tasmania 




Victoria ... 


§25,966 


West Australia i 


Total 




1,599,350 


555,146 





* In addition to 41,320 tons silver lead valued at *1,872,657 ; 87,919 tons silver ore valued at £794,487. 
1 1,913 tons silver lead valued at £56,639. 

t No reliable information ; amount here given shows the quantity received at the mints in Australia. 
§ Extracted from gold at the Melbourne mint. 

George Anderson, 

Deputy Master . 



BRITISH INDIA. 

Table showing the Imports of Silver Into the 'Mints for Coinage under 
the Paper Currency Act, the Net Imports into India, and the Amounts 
Coined during each of the Five Financial Years from 1885-'86 to 1889-’90, 
inclusive. 



Year. 


Imports into the mints un- 
der the paper-currency aot. 


Net imports into India. 


Coinage. 


1885- ’86 

1886- ’87 

1887- *88 

1888- ’89 

1889- ’90 

1890- ’91 

Total 


Rupees. 
88, 385,800 
38, 221, 700 
71, 358, 600 
65,505,900 
80, 448, 300 
125, 242, 441 


$41,868,353 
18, 105, 619 
33,802,569 
31, 030, 145 
38, 108, 360 
59, 327, 344 


Rupees. 

116,066,000 

71.557.000 

92. 287. 000 

92. 466. 000 
109, 379, 000 
141, 751, 359 


$54, 980,464 
33, 896, 551 
43, 716, 352 
43, 801, 144 
51,812,832 
67, 147, 618 


Rupees. 
202,855,600 
46, Ido, 300 
107,884,300 
72,822,500 
85, 511, 600 
131, 634, 741 


$48, 722, 698 
21,868,502 
51, 104, 793 
34,496, 018 
40, 506, 845 
62,355,376 


469, 162, 741 


222,242,390 


623, 506, 359 


295, 354, 961 


646,874,041 


259,054,232 



Statement Showing the Amount of Silver Coined at the Calcutta and 
Bombay Mints During the Calendar Year 1890. 



Rupees — 
£ rupees . . . 
-I rupees . . . 
f rupees . . . 

Total 



Denominations. 



Value in rupees. 


Value in United 
States money. 


117,641,865 


$55,726,951 


2 433, 414 


1, 152, 708 


2,220, 104 


1,051,663 


122, 295, 383 


57,931,322 

. 



Digitized by tjOOQLe 




224 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Table Showing the Value of the Imports and Exports of Gold and Silver 
Coin and Bullion into British India, Registered in the Twelve Months, 
April 1 , 1890, to March 31, 1891, Compared with the Corresponding Periods 
of the Years 1888-’89 and 1889-'90. 

GOLD. 



Countries. 


Imports. 


Exports. 


Twelve months, April 1 to March 
31— 


Twelve months, April 1 to March 

31— 


l*88-’89. 


1889-’90. 


1800- ’91. 


1888-’89. 


1889-’90. 


1890-’91. 


Europe: 

United Kingdom 

Austria 

France 


Rupees. 
10, 656, 590 
45,905 
708,006 
102, 380 

474, 826 
1,107,613 


Rupees. 
24, 438, 740 
7, 834 
1, 243,922 
72, 780 
139, 501 

697, 127 
1, 865, 152 


Rupees. 
38, 141. 112 
62,637 
1, 282, 868 


! Rupees. 

2, 861, 867 
31,205 
• 23,000 


Rupees. 

4, 447, 219 
13,507 
31,700 


Rupees. 

8,218,734 

45,146 


Other countries in Europe 
Africa : 

Eastern coast of Africa. . 
Mauritius 


46,363 

397,894 
1,765, 416 
1,689 
122,234 

55,000 

641, 217 
1, 056, 662 
17, 372 
9, 634,299 




70 

7,728 

150 


42,070 

400 


Other countries in Africa. 
America: 

United States 


4,950 


13,140 












* 


Asia : ' 

Aden 

Arabia 


1,103, 497 
2, 125, 334 


357, 056 
1,575, 408 
95, 050 
13, 346, 788 


1, 875 


1,599 


1,335 

7,920 


Ceylon 


20.000 


14,700 


Cliina 


9, 352, 872 1 




Java 


29, 750 
5,344 
14,000 
64,500 






Persia 

Straits Settlements 

Turkey in Asia 

Australia 


42. 408 
144, 727 
202, 496 
5, 119, 278 


51, 235 " 
92, 859 
353, 793 
6,359,888 


83,483 
272,486 
387, 018 
| 11,040,567 


21,662 

18,900 


10, 190 
13,938 
- 306,867 


Total value in rupees. . 
Total weight in tolas . . 







1 


31, 190, 882 
1, 366, 098 


50,710,273 J 65,008,317 
2, 267, 286 j 3, 135, 668 


3, 051, 541 
135,227 


A, 557, 235 
204,928 


8, 646,600 
431,056 



SILVER. 



Europe: 

United Kingdom 

Austria. 

France 

Italy 

Other countries in Europe 
Africa: 

Eastern coast of Africa. . 

Mauritius 

Other countries in Africa 
America : 

United States 

Asia : 

Aden 

Arabia 

Ceylon 

China 

Java 


68, 826, 394 

1, 324, 271 
1, 093, 820 
1,772, 100 


97, 691, 280 

1, 081, 035 
2, 048, 851 
200,000 


75,408,343 

9, 728, 416 
1, Oil, 240 
1, 007, 525 


*227,246 

1,720 

525,281 

15,000 

40 

1, 001, 339 

1, 394, 498 
35, 450 

800 

C *731,600 
i t773, 000 
*f, 157, 590 

5, 308, 000 
387, 675 
152,400 


67,045 

1,793 
914,050 
2, 000 
500 

1, 010, 477 
157 

1, 153, 000 
17,800 

*701, 728 
t600, 000 
5*1,324,423 
l 110,000 
6, 022, 210 
286, 557 
18,000 


f 302, 091 
\ tie, 500 
119 
316,500 
76, 300 


381,540 
94, 349 
103, 800 
27, 975 

9, 257, 244 

' 177, 499 

j 2,351,816 

534,892 
19, 385, 528 


484, 550 
66, 241 
4,200 
216,848 

1,887,300 

783,231 

4, 086, 093 

1, 550, 270 
9, 314, 645 


136,663 
281, 897 

483.200 
541,496 

423, 100 

930, 977 

4, 195,464 

937.201 
36, 297, 690 


1,885,505 

900 

2,900 

*314, 799 
t470, 000 
*894,856 

6,507,500 
842, 510 


Japan 




375,000 
*1, 258, 348 
1 2, 000 


1,090,600 
*1, 790, 126 
1 150, 000 




Persia 

Siam 


f *757,479 

* 

2, 868 
265, 326 
669, 092 

6,700 

226,024 


*1, 845, 620 
1 3, 800 


*1, 027, 225 
f2, 020 


*524, 125 
tl,400 


Straits Settlements 

Turkey in Asia 

Other countries in Asia. 
Australia 


474, 780 
1, 220, 552 

1,400 
1, 138, 116 


12, 947, 047 
1, 943, 923 

28,521 
5, 003, 130 


767, 074 
*216, 100 
< *215,995 
\ 1 31, 700 


1, 125, 573 
*184, 325 
*5,100 
1 32, 000 


386,685 
*14, 759 
*2,925 
1 24, 820 


Total private— 

Value in rupees 

Weight in tolas 

Total Government — 

Value in rupees 

Weight in tolas 








107, 258, 717 
10J, 919, 106 


123, 882, 740 
117, 173, 091 

2,000 

2,000 


154, 186, 559 
149, 692, 321 

150,000 

150,000 


13, 983, 428 
13, 614, 532 

308, 500 
808, 500 


13, 861, 963 
13, 481, 008 

644,020 

644,020 


12, 072, 465 
11, 916, 448 

512, 720 
514,980 



•Private. 



t Government. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 





REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT, 



225 



Total Coinage, Gold and Silver. 

The value of the total coinage of gold and silver at each of the two mints of India 
for the last five years is shown below. 

CALCUTTA. 





1886-’87. 


1887-88. 


1888-’89. 


1889-’90. 


i890-’9i. 


Gold 


Rupees. 


Rupees. 


Rupees. 

* 226, 100 
10, 474, 500 


Rupees. 

230, 500 
10, 958, 600 


Rupees. 


Silver 


10, 745, 700 


47, 052, 300 


38, 546, 300 


Total 


10, 745, 700 


47,052. 300 


10, 700, 600 


11, 189, 100 


38, 546, 300 





BOMBAY. 





1886-’87. 


1887-’88. 


1888-’89. 


1889-’90. 


1890-91. 


Gold 


Rupees. 


Rupees. 


Rupees. 


Rupees. 


Rupees. 


Silver 


35, 419, 600 


60, 832, 000 


62, 348, 000 


74, 553, 000 


93, 088, 500 


Total 


35, 419, 600 


60, 832, 000 


62, 348, 000 


74, 553, 000 


93, 088, 500 



FRANCE. 

Legation of the United States, 

- Paris, May 27, 1891 . 

Sir: In reply to a printed circular received from Mr. Blaine under date of Decem- 
ber 10, 1890, instructing me, at the instance of the Secretary of the Treasury, to pre- 
pare replies to certain questions touching coinage and precious metals in France, 
and to transmit the same direct to the Director of the Mint, I have the honor of 
sending you the report herewith. 

As the information therein contained can only be obtained through the minister 
of finance, I beg leave to remind you that by supplying this legation with copies of 
all reports and documents issued by the Treasury, which might be acceptable to the 
French officials in charge of the matters embraced in your interrogatories, you would 
enable me to secure more easily prompt replies to our inquiries. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Whitelaw Reid. 



The Director of the Mint, 

Treasury Department , Washington, D. C. 



Answers to interrogatories, 1S90, 

(1) Amount of Gold Coined during the Calendar Year 1890. 



Denomination. 


Coined. 


Recoined. 


Number of 
coins. 


Total value. 


Number of 
coins. 


Total value. 


20 francs -- -- - ........... 


1, 030, 140 


Francs. 
20, 602, 800 


599,979 


Francs. 
11, 999,580 





All domestic coins. 

10285 u 15 



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226 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



(2) Amount of Silver Coined during the Calendar Year 1890. 



Coined. 



Denomination. 



For the French colony of Indo-Cliina : 

Various 

For the Great- Comoro : 

5 francs 



Xamber of ! Total value, 
coins. 



Francs. 

6,108 I 33,345.84 

2,050 i 10, 250. (K» 

I 



(3 and 4) Importation. 
GOLD. 



Description, 


Weight. 


Value. 


Gold coins 


Kilos. 
19, 141 
16,126 


Francs. 

61,252,947 

55,473,461 


Gold bullion 





SILVER. 





605,912 


115 123 .149 


Silver bullion 


142, 345 


22, 775^282 





Exportation. 

GOLD. 



Gold coins . . 
Gold bullion 



40, 588 158, 682, 599 

26, 399 90, 815, 405 



SILVER. 





494, 178 
87, 477 


93,893 998 


Silver bullion . _ _ 


13, 996^ 321 





(5 and 6) The result is not yet known for 1890. For 1889 it is as follows : 

Gold: 

Weight kilos.. 400 

Value francs . . 1, 372, 000 

Silver: 

Weight kilos. . 80, 942 

Value francs.. 12.950.720 



(7) The amount of gold coined since the law of Germinal 18, 3rd year (April 7, 
1795), is in force, that is to say, from the adoption of the decimal system to the end 
of the year 1890, is 8,718,170,210 francs, not comprising the pieces recoined. Part of 
this gold was exported, but on the other hand foreign coins have entered France, and 
the result of a test made at the mint in 1890 on 147,000,000 pieces shows a proportion 
of about 17 per cent of foreign coins in the total gold circulation in the country. 
There are no means of determining the exact amount in circulation. January 2, 1891, 
the gold in the Bank of France amounted to 1,120,126,439.91 francs. 

(8) The quantity of silver coined in pieces of 5 francs up to December 31, 1890, 
amounted to 5,060,606,240 francs. The amount of the same in the Bank of France 
was 1,240,874,500.25 francs. The amount of silver in circulation is unknown. 

(9) The amount of paper currency issued by the Bank of France was 3,051,751,440 
francs. 

(10) None. 

(11) The report of the mint for the year 1889 is not yet issued. The mint will send 
you two copies as soon as it is published, but I annex herewith two printed copies of 
the report of the committee for supervising the coinage and the monetary circulation 
in France issued January 31, 1891. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



227 



I. — French Coins Manufactured in 1890. 



[From the Bulletin de Statistique, January, 1891, p. 72.] 



Denomination of pieces. 


Number of 
pieces. 


Nominal 

value. 


Gold — 


1,030 140 


Francs. 

20, 602, 800 






Total gold 


1,030,140 


20, 602, 800 


Bronze — 

Pieces of 10 centimes 

Pieces of 5 centimes 

Pieces of 2 centimes 

Pieces of 1 centime 


1, 060, 000 
1, 680, 000 

300. 000 

400.000 


106,000 

84,000 

6,000 

4,000 


Total bronze 


3, 440, 000 


200, 000 


General total 


4,470, 140 


20,802,800 



II. — Coins for Indo-China. 



Denomination of pieces. 


Number of 
pieces. 


Nominal 

value. 


Silver — 

Pieces of 1 piaster 


6, 108 


Francs. 

33,245.84 



III.— Coins for the Great-Comoro. 



* Denomination of pieces. 


Number of 
pieces. 


Nominal 

value. 


Silver- 

Pieces of 5 francs 


2, 050 


Francs. 

10, 250 


Total silver 


2, 050 


10, 250 


Bronze — 

Pieces of 10 centimes 

Pieces of 5 centimes 


50, 200 
100, 200 


5,020 
5, 010 


Total bronze 


150, 400 


10, 030 


General total 


152, 450 


20, 280 


IV. — Foreign Coins — IIayti. 


Denomination of pieces. 


Number of 
pieces. 


Nominal 

value. 


Silver — 

Pieces of T Vo gourde 

Pieces of gourde • 

Pieces of A'a gourde 


100, 000 
750, 000 
1,000,000 


Francs. 

250.000 

750.000 

500.000 


General total 


1, 850, 000 


1, 500, 000 


RECAPITULATION OF COINS MANUFACTURED. 


Nationality. 


Number of 
pieces. 


Nominal 

value. 


I.— French coins 

n. — Coins of Indo-China 

III. — Coins of the Great-Comoro 

IV. — Foreign coins, Hay ti 


4, 470, 140 
6,108 
152, 450 
i 1,850,000 


Francs. 

20, 802, 800. 00 
33, 245. 84 
20, 280. 00 
| 1,500,000.00 


General total 


6,478,698 

1 • i 


| 22,356,325.84 
1 




oOOQk 




228 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Maintenance of the Monetary Circulation . 
[Results obtained in 1888 and 1890, 20-franc pieces.] 



Pieces verified. 



In value francs 

In number pieces 

Nationality : 

Foretell do. . 

Frencn: 

Good pieces do. . 

Light pieces do. . 

Counterfeit or altered pieces do. . 

Proportion : 

Of foreign pieces per cent 

Of light pieces relatively to French pieces do. . 

Light pieces : 

Weight before the melt kilos 

Average weight (l.OOOths) of legal weight 

Weight after the melt kilos 

Fineness 

Fine weight kilos 

Fine according to legal weight and legal fineness, .do. . 

Fine lacking do. . 

Newjneces to replace light pieces: 

Number 

Weight kilos 

Fineness 

Fine kilos 

Fine restored do. . 



1889. 


1890. 


Results since 
the begin- 
ning of the 
operation of 
maintenance. 


100, 000. 000 


147, 000, 000 


247,000,000 


5, 000, 000 


7, 350, 000 


12, 350, 000 


884, 420 


1, 217, 864 


2, 102, 284 


3, 701, 538 


5,531,861 


9, 233, 399 


413, 679 


599, 979 


1,013,658 


*363 


t296 


659 


17. 69 


16. 57 


16.92 


10. 03 


9. 78 


9. 89 


2,644.917 


i 3, 837. 026 


. 6,481.943 


0.991 


| 0.991 


0. 991 


2, 643. 726 


i 3,835.721 


6, 479. 447 


0. 899 


i 0.899 1 


0. 899 


2,377.083 


3, 448. 999 


5, 826. 083 


2,402.003 


3,483.747 


5, 885. 753 


+ 24. 922 


+ 34. 747 


:59. 670 


413, 679 


1 599, 979 


1,013, 658 


2, 668. 541 


3, 870. 690 


6, 539. 231 


0. 900 


0. 900 | 


0.900 


2, 401.959 


1 3,484.194 


5, 886. 154 


24, 876. 345 


| 35, 195. 100 


60,071.445 



* This figure embraces 361* counterfeit pieces (gilt platinum), or 0.05 per cent, and 70 fraudulently al- 
tered pieces, or 0.01 per cent. 

t This figure embraces 225 counterfeit pieces (gilt platinum), or 0.03 per cent, and 71 fraudulently 
altered pieces, or 0.01 per cent. 

♦The difference between the weight of the fine restored and of the fine lacking [comes from the play 
of the tolerances. 



(Bulletin de Statistique, January, 1891, p. 74.) 



Table Showing the Weekly Circulation and Reserve of the Bank of 

France during 1890. 



Dates. 



Jan. 2... 

9.. . 
16 ... 

23.. . 

30.. . 
Feb. 6... 

13.. . 

20 .. . 

27.. . 
Mar. 6... 

13.. . 

20 .. . 

27.. . 
Apr. 3... 

10 .. . 

17.. . 

24.. . 
May 1... 

8 .. . 

16 .. . 

22 

29 '. ' ’. 
June 5 — 
12 ... 

19.. . 

26.. . 
July 3... 

10... 

17 .... 



Reserve. 



Circulation. 



3 , 155 , 200 , 000 
3 , 157 . 400 , 000 
3 , 191 . 300 , 000 
3 , 170 . 300 , 000 

3 . 108 , 900 , 000 
3 , 165 , 800 , 000 
3 , 139 , 900 , 000 

3 . 106 . 100 , 000 

3 . 109 , 900 , 000 
3 , 103 , 700 , 000 
3 , 078 , 300 , 000 
3 . 050 , 30 a 000 
3 , 025 , 700 , 000 

3 . 100 , 800 , 000 
3 . 074 , 100 , 000 
3 . 091 , 200 , 000 
3 , 042 , 800 , 000 
3 , 086 , 900 , 000 
3 , 054 , 700 , 000 

3 . 037 . 100 , 000 
3 , 014 , 400 , 000 
3 , 006 , 300, 000 
3 , 041 , 800 , 000 
3 , 025 , 400 , 000 
3 , 003 , 600 , 000 

2 , 989 . 700 , 000 

3 , 097 , 800 , 00 ft 
3, 081. 300,000 
3, 076, 300, 000 



Gold. 



Francs. 

1 , 261 , 600 , 000 
1 , 255 . 900 , 000 
1 , 252 , 400 , 000 
1 , 254 , 000 , 000 
250 , 900 , 000 
1 , 252 , 900 , 000 
1 , 254 , 100 , 000 
1 , 253 , 300 , 000 
1 , 251 , 800 , 000 
1 , 250 , 700 , 000 
1 , 230 , 300 , 000 
1 , 254 , 400 , 000 
1 , 259 , 600 , 000 
1 , 262 , 000 , 000 
1 , 255 , 700 , 000 
1 , 261 , 200, 000 
1 , 276 , 900, 000 
1 , 279 , 800, 000 
1 , 285 , 900, 000 

1 . 292 . 600. 000 
1 , 303 , 600 , 000 
1 , 308 , 100 , 000 
1 , 311 , 000, 000 
1 , 310 , 100 , 000 
1 , 314 , 700 , 000 
1 , 316 , 600 , 000 

1 , 320, 900, 000 1 

1.314.600.000 | 

1.314.200.000 , 



Silver. 



Francs. 

1 , 242 , 300 , 000 

1 . 239 . 100 , 000 
1 , 240 , 000 , 000 
1 , 241 , 500 , 000 
1 , 243 , 700 , 000 
1 , 245 , 800, 000 
1 , 245 , 000 , 000 
1 , 248 , 400 , 000 
1 , 248 , 600 , 000 
1 , 250 , 500 , 000 
1 , 250 , 300 , 000 
1 , 253 , 700 , 000 

1 . 256 . 800 , 000 
1 , 259 , 700, 000 
1 , 257 , 200 , 000 

1 . 257 . 800 , 000 
1 , 264 , 000 , 000 
1 , 265 , 200, 000 

1 . 265 , 600 , 000 

1 . 266 , 600, 000 
1 , 268 , 800 , 000 
1 , 270 , 400, 000 

1 . 274 . 400 , 000 

1 . 273 . 400 , 000 

1 . 276 . 100 , 000 
1 , 274 , 500 , 000 
1 , 271 , 800 , 000 
1 , 268 , 100 , 000 
1 , 264 , 100, 000 

Digitized by 



Total. 



Francs. 

2, 503, 900, 000 

2. 495. 000. 000 

2.492. 400.000 

2. 495. 500. 000 

2. 494. 600. 000 

2. 498. 700. 000 

2.499. 100.000 
2, 501, 700, 000 
2, 500, 400, 000 
2, 501, 200, 000 
2, 500, 600, 000 
2, 508, 100, 000 

2. 516. 400.000 
2, 521, 700, 000 
2, 512, 900, 000 
2, 519, 000, 000 
2, 540, 900, 000 

2. 545. 000. 000 

2. 551. 500. 000 
2, 559, 200, 000 

2. 572. 400. 000 
2, 578, 500, 000 

2. 585. 400. 000 
2, 583, 500. 000 
2, 590, 800, 00U 
2, 591, 100, 000 

2. 592. 700, 000 

2. 582. 700, 000 
2, 578, 300, 000 

Google 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 229 



Taijle Showixg the Weekly Circulation and Reserve of the Bank of 
France during 1890 — Continued. 





Circulation. 


Reserve. 


Total. 




Gold. 


Silver. 


July 24 


3, 009, 100, 000 


Francs. 

\ 1,319,100,000 


1 204, 01 0,000 


Francs . 

" 000 


31 


3, (588, 500, 000 1 


1 1.315.800,000 


0,000 


2. 581, 700, 000 


Aug. 7 


2, 972, 300, 000 


1,317,300, 000 


0,000 


2, 584, 69(1, 909 


14 


2, 955, 000, 000 


1,315 100, 000 


10,000 


2,3*2,100,000 


21 


2, 919, 100, 000 


1, 700,000 


' 0, 000 


2, 5*3, 690, 000 


28 


2, 905, 300, 000 


1, 50,000 


1 27 1. 7"0, 000 


2.584,400, (5(50 


Sept. 4 


2, 942, 300, 000 


1, 50, 000 


"0,000 


2, 572, 300, 000 


11 


2, 954, 500. 000 


1, 00, 000 


1 '1 "0,000 


2, 553, 00(5, 900 


18 


2, 962, 000, 000 


1, ( 00, 000 


1 2 2. 900,000 


2, 540, 0(50, 000 


25 


2, 948, 900, 000 


1,2*5* )0,000 


0, 000 


2. 527. 500, 0O0 


Oet. 2 


3, 022, 000, 000 


1, >0,000 


12. ,:: a00, 000 


2, 590, 70(5, 000 


9 


3, 044, 200, 000 


1, 12 50, 000 


1,247. ' 0, 000 


2, 490, 700, 150(1 


16 


3. 086, 500, 000 


1,219 >0,000 


•0,000 


2, 460, 009. 009 


25 


3, 053, 800, 000 


1, 700,000 


I 0, 000 


2, 452, luo. «NK) 


30 


3, 092, (500, 000 


1,1159, 100, 000 
1, 106, 700, 000 


1,2 9', 8 0,000 


2, 443, 900, mi 


Nov. 6 


3, 074, 300. 000 


1, 244, "0,000 


2,441, 500.090 


13 


3, 08 : 5, 100. 000 


1, 1 >0, 000 


1.214 0,000 


2, 440, 2 09. OOO 


20 


1 3. 065, 100, 000 


1,111 600,000 


1, 247, 7 0, 000 


2, 362, 300, 000 


27 


3, 061, 400, 000 


1,114,900, 000 


1,240, 4i>0, 000 


2, 861 , 30*5, 090 


Dee. 4 


3, 073, 500, 000 


1,121,900,000 

1,12" i H), 000 


i '50, 000 
>50,000 


2, 360, 1(5*5, 000 


11 


3, 061, 000, 000 


2, 303, 100, IKK) 


18 


3, 062, 100, 000 


1, 124 _ >0, 000 


0,000 


2, 370. 700, 009 


26 


1 3, 051, 800, 000 

1 


1, K), 000 


1, 2 95. 2*50,000 


2, 372, 200. 0*50 



(Bulletin tie Btatistique, January, 1891, p. 76.) 



BELGIUM. 

Legation of the United States, 

Brussels, April 2, 1891. 

Sir: In accordance with a circular of instructions received from the Department 
of State relative to coinage statistics in Belgium for the past year, I have obtained 
partial data on the subject in a communication just received from his excellency, 
the Prince de Cliimay, minister of foreign affairs, inclosing certain responses to 
your questions made by the Commissioner of the Mint. 

I beg to inclose herewith translations of the communication above referred to from 
the minister-of foreign aff airs, and of the answers made by the Commissioner of the 
Mint. 

As soon as I receive the additional statistics desired I shall make you a supple- 
mentary report. 

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, 

Edwin H. Terrell. 

The Director of the Mint, 

Washington, D, C. 



Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 

Brussels, January 23. 1891 . 

Mr. Minister : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the communication 
which your excellency has kindly addressed me, December 26, last. 

Your excellency will find herewith inclosed a note responding to some of the 
questions which you have propounded in the name of your Government, concerning 
the monetary situation in Belgium. 

The Government of the King will only be in possession iu the course of the month 
of June next of the necessary data for responding to questions 3 and 4, relative 
to the commercial movement of precious metals (gold and silver) in 1890. 

I shall not fail to communicate this information to your excellency as soon as it 
reaches me. 

I will add, Mr. Minister, that the department of finance and the national hank 
of Belgium do not possess the necessary data for indicating, even in an approximate 



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230 



REPORT OE THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



manner, the stock of money anti bars of gold and silver at the end of the last year 
(questions 7 anti 8). 

As to the hank notes (question 9), there had been emitted up to December 31, 
1890, by the national bank, the sum of 536,450,000 francs. 

1 sieze this occasion, etc., 

The Prince de Chimay. 



To His Excellency, Mr. Ei>win 11. Terrell, Etc. 



Answers to Interrogatories — IS 90. 

(1 and 2) National money: In 1890, nothing coined or recoined. Foreign money i 
In 1883 the Government of the King authorized the coining of money for the Sultan- 
ate of Zanzibar. This work, after two years of suspension, was resumed in 1890, 
and is again suspended. The quantity made up to this day is as follows: 

1883. 

Gold. — 2,119 pieces of 5-dollars, of a weight of 17.715 kilograms. 

Silver. — 10,000 pieces of 1-dollar, of a weight of 271.838 kilograms. 

Copper. — 680,000 pieces of a pesa, of a weight of 4,398.512 kilograms, and of an 
attributed value of 5,000 dollars (the dollar equals 136 pesas). 

1885. 

Silver. — 50,000 pieces of 1-dollar, of a weight of 1,359.886 kilograms. 

188G. 

Copper. — 3,960,000 pieces of 1-pesa, of a weight of 25,514.944 kilograms. 

1887. 

Copper. — 3,520,000 pieces of 1-pesa, of a weight of 22,700.584 kilograms. 

1800. 

Copper. — 2,570,000 pieces of 1-pesa, of a weight of 16,630.726 kilograms. 

(3 and 4) No data. 

(5 and 6) Without object for Belgium. 

(7 and 8) No data. 

(9) There had been emitted by the national bank, up to December 31st, 1890, the 
sum of 536,450,000 francs. 

(10) No. 

(11) No report has been published. 

Sainctelette. 

The Commissioner of the Mint. 



Legation of the United States, 

Brussels , April 9, 1891. 

Sir : I have the honor to state that the “ Moniteur Beige ” has just published a royal 
decree, instituting a permanent commission in Belgium for the study and investiga- 
tion of monetary questions, especially that connected with the coinage of silver. 

The same official journal also published a report made to the King by the minister 
of finance, upon which the decree was based. 

Realizing that this action may be regarded as of considerable interest to our Gov- 
ernment, I have procured several copies of the “Moniteur,” which I inclose herewith. 
I also inclose herewith translations into English of the report and decree above 
mentioned. 

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, 

Edwin H. Terrell. 



Secretary of State, 

Washington, D . C . 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 231 

INSTITUTION OF A PERMANENT COMMITTEE FOR THE STUDY OF MONETARY QUESTIONS. 

[Report to the King.] 

Brussels, April 1 , 1891, 

Sire : Monetary questions, through their complex character, have from all times 
caused expressions of the most diverse ideas. Few of them, in the economic order, 
have produced so marked a difference of opinion. 

For a long time it has been possible to debate these questions from a somewhat 
theoretical point of view, and that not only in the countries whose monetary system 
is based upon the employment of a single metal as a monetary standard, but also in 
those who make use at the same time of gold and silver for their legal-tender moneys. 
The variations which were produced in the respective value of the two precious 
metals were not sufficiently serious to compromise the regular working of the regime 
sanctioned by the legislation in force. 

For a certain number of years the persistent decline of the value of silver relatively 
to gold has profoundly modified this situation, accentuating itself in proportions 
unknown until then. The new monetary legislation of Germany has decided the 
countries which form the Latin Union to derogate, at least temporarily, from the 
regime of the double standard, and to interdict, by common accord, the free coinage 
of silver. # 

The new situation resulting from deep rupture of the old relation of the value of 
gold and silver continues to justify the most serious preoccupations. 

Limited to what it was at the time the coinage of silver was stopped, the mone- 
tary circulation of the white metal seems bound to reach, for the Latin Union, at 
least two and one-half milliards of francs. This figure alone suffices to cause to be 
appreciated the importance of the sacrifices which the definite abandonment of tho 
bimetallic system and the demonetization of silver would bring about. 

The eventuality of this demonetization — is it to be foreseen, and what would be its 
consequences ? 

The perturbations which have been produced since nearly twenty years in the 
value of monetary metals have been followed by profound economic troubles. 

Some have believed to find in this the proof that the economical crisis to the in- 
fluence of which the world suffers are but the consequence, more or less direct, of 
the monetary state of the world ; they see in the limitation of the coinage of silver 
one of the most manifest causes of the evil, and predict yet greater evils In case of a 
more general contraction of this circulation. Others, noting that the crisis thrives 
with the same intensity in all countries, whatsoever their monetary regime, are of 
opinion that one can not draw a conclusion as to the connexity of the two phenom- 
ena and of their consequences. 

What foundation is there in these contradictory appreciations? 

The problem is the most complicated; it is under consideration in all countries 
of the world, and in order to give it a practical solution one can not resort to too 
much light. 

By virtue of article 11 of the monetary convention of the 6th November, 1885, the 
French Government has accepted the mission of centralizing all the administrative 
documents and statistics relative to the emission of money, to the production and 
to the use of precious metals and to the monetary circulation. 

It has engaged to communicate these documents to the other governments of the 
Latin Union, and it has been understood that these governments would act in con- 
cert, if necessary, as to the measures proper to give all desirable exactitude to this 
information. 

In order to satisfy these engagements, the French Government has instituted a 
permanent commission, which is not to confine itself solely to collecting useful doc- 
uments, but which, being composed of men of a high value, is qualified to examine 
and to discuss with competence and authority all the questions which are connected 
with the monetary problem. 

Italy equally has instituted a special committee having for an object to submit to 
a permanent examination the facts which are produced upon the monetary question 
and to place itself for this purpose in relation with similar committees instituted 
abroad. 

England, which however has only gold coinage, has herself also taken a lively in- 
terest in the question, and the extensive examination which the gold and silver 
commission has made has furnished abundant and valuable information. 

I think, sire, that Belgium has equally an interest in proceeding to an investiga- 
tion of this character by assembling for this purpose in a special committee some 
men having in this matter a recognized experience and competence. 

It is the creation of this committee which I have the honor, sire, to propose to 
your Majesty by submitting the project of the annexed decree. 

The commission should be required to collect all documents and information 



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232 



REPORT OP TTTE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



which can serve to elucidate questions relative to coinage; it should place itself in 
continued relations with commissions, committees or bureaus, which, in foreign 
countries, are specially occupied with these questions, and it will be for the Govern- 
ment a useful assistance. 

The Minister of Finance, 

A. Beernaert. 



DECREE. 

Leopold II, King of the Belgians. 

To all present and to come , greeting: 

Upon the proposition of our minister of finance we have decreed and do decree — 

Article I. There is instituted at the ministry of finance a permanent commission 
for the study of monetary questions. 

Article II. This commission is charged — 

(1) To collect all information which it can upon the monetary legislation of for- 
eign countries, upon the changes which will be brought about or proposed in this 
legislation, upon monetary circulation, upon the production and the international 
distribution of the precious metals, and generally upon all the facts which are of a 
nature to be taken into consideration for the solution of monetary questions. 

(2) To place itself in relation and to hold itself in continued communication with 
commissions, committees, or bureaus charged in other countries with investigations 
or studies relative to these same questions. 

(3) To bring to the notice of the Government facts and documents which it may 
judge specially interesting from the point of view of the monetary regime of Belgium, 
and to give to the Government its advice upon questions which it will submit to its 
examination. 

Article III. Members of the said commission are named as follows : Messrs. 
Allard, director of the mint; Baeyens, director of the General Society for Favoring 
National Industry; de Laveleye (Em), professor of political economy at the Univer- 
sity of Liege; Jacobs, minister of state, member of the Chamber of Representatives ; 
Montefiore Levi, senator; Sainctelette, commissioner of the mint, and Weber, vice- 
governor of the national bank. 

Article IV. Mr. Jacobs will fill the functions of president and Mr. Sainctelette 
those of secretary. 

Our minister of finance can also convoke the commission under his presidency. 

Article V. Our minister of finance is charged with the execution of the present 
decree. 

Done at Lacken April 2, 1891. 

Leopold. 

By the King. 

The Minister of Finance, 

A. Beernaert. 



Legation of the United States, 

Brussels, August 27, 1891 . 

Sir : Referring to the circular instruction from the Department of State, relative 
to coinage statistics in Belgium for 1890, and to my report to you on the subject of 
April 2, 1891, I desire to say that I have received some additional data from his 
excellency the Prince de Chimay, Minister of Foreign Affairs, which I beg to trans- 
mit herewith as an in closure. 

I am informed by the minister that it is not possible to furnish separate statistics 
touching the importation and exportation of the precious metals in bars, these 
being included under the heading “gold and silver un wrought,” which embraces 
also dust, filings, and waste. 

I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

Edwin H. Terrell. 



The Director of the Mint, 

Washington , D, C, 



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233 



Importations and Exportations of Gold, Silver, and Platinum during the 

Year 1890. 

GOLD, INCLUDING PLATINUM. 



Description. 


| Importations. 


| Exportations. 


Gold ore 1 

Gold, un wrought 

Gold, coined 

Jewelry and gold ware. . . 






kilos. . 

do. . . 

do... 

francs. . 


10,670 
2.901 
272 
2, 109. 145 


139 
155 
60, 631 



SILVER. 



Silver ore kilos. . 

Silver, un wrought do. . . 

Silver, coined do. . . 

Jewelry and silverware francs. . 



217, 009 
7,048 
22, 985 
1, 066, 637 



947 
5, 284 
21, 271 
46, 870 



SWITZERLAND. 



Legation of the United States, 
Berne , January 10, 1890. 

Sir : The Swiss Government has given this legation replies to circular of Decem- 
ber 10, as follows : 



Answer 8 to interrogatories , 1890. 



(1) The federal mint stamped in 1890, 125,000 pieces of 20-francs in gold. 

(2) During the same period, 290,000 silver pieces of 5-francs were recoined. There 
was no other coinage of silver. 

(3 and 4) Gold. 



Description. 


Weight. 


Value. 


Importation : 

Gold coin . - 


Kilos. 

4, 144 
5,456 

965 
3, 168 


Francs. 
12, 846, 400 
18, 855, 936 

2, 990, 507 
3, 366, 010 


Unwrongkt gold 


Exportation : 

Gold coin 


Unwrought gold 





Silver. 



Importation : 


176, 933 


35, 398, 600 
8, 758, 860 

18, 542, 050 
1, 373, 990 




53^ 084 


ExportationY 

Silver coin 


92, 530 
8, 699 


Unwrought silver 





(5 and 6) Switzerland possesses no mines of the precious metals. 

(7) The stock of gold coin in the Swiss hanks of issue amounted on the 27tli of 
December, 1890, to 61,414,835 francs. 

(8) At the same date these banks possessed a stock of 23,475,820 francs of silver 
coin. 

(9) The total note circulation of Swiss banks of issue was, on the 27tli of last De- 
cember, 168,397,200 francs. Switzerland has no state notes in circulation. 

(10) No law was promulgated during 1890 relative to coinage or the issue of coins, 
or to the issue or the circulation of bank notes. 

(11) The federal mint has published no special report on its operations. The re- 
port of the department of finance gives a succinct account every year of the work 
done by the mint. 

The D i khutor of the Mint. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



ITALY. 



Rome, March 6 , 1891. 

Sir: In reply &o a circular from the Department of State, dated December 10 last, 
I have the honor to forward the following information: 

Answers to interrogatories. 

(1) In the year 1890, 1,304,400 lire were coined in gold pieces of 20-lire, equal to 
20 francs. No gold was withdrawn from circulation during the year, and conse- 
quently none was recoined 

(2) By virtue of the royal decrees of August 10, 1890, Nos. 7049 and 7050, inclosed 
herewith, there was coined in the mints of the kingdom special money for the colony 
of Eritrea as follows : 

Lire. 

In pieces of 2 lire 2, 000, 000 

In pieces of 1 lira 598, 702 

In pieces of 0.50 centisimi 343, 341 

Total 2, 942, 043 



Five thousand six hundred and fifty-five lire, in pieces of 50 centisimi, were with- 
drawn from circulation because disfigured or worn, and the same sum was recoined 
in new 50-centisimi pieces. 

(3 and 4) The imports and exports of gold and silver were — 



Metals. 


Imports. 


Exports. 


Gold coin 


Lire. 
6,479.000 
3,434,600 
47, 734,400 
355,600 


Lire. 

19, 086, 700 
691,600 
46, 876, 800 
2, 071, 960 


Gold bar 


Silver coin 


Silver bar 





(5 and 0.) It has been found impossible to obtain satisfactory information concern- 
ing these questions. 

(7) It is impossible to estimate the quantity of gold coin circulating in the coun- 
try at the end of 1890. At the same time there was in gold bars — 



Lire. 

In the treasury and mint 103, 303, 524 

In the banks 353, 863, 685 



Total 457, 167, 209 

(8) The amount iu coin and silver bars on December 31, 1890, was: 

Lire. 

In treasury and mint 49, 776, 661 

In banks 55,551,947 

Total 105,328,608 

(9) December 31, 1890, the circulation of notes in Italy was: 

Lire. 

On account of state 342, 809, 234 

On account of banks 1, 126, 440, 443 



Total 



1,460,249,677 



(10) (See question No. 2.) 

(11) The report of the director general of the treasury, from which the mints are 
supervised, is not yet completed, but a copy will be forwarded as soon as practica- 
ble. 



I am, sir, your obedient servant, 



A. G. Porter. 



The Director of the Mint, 

Treasury Department, Washington , D. C, 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



235 • 



Royal decree No. 7049. referred to in the answer to question No. 2, authorizing the mints 

of the Kingdom of Italy to stamp special decimal coins to have legal currency exclusively 

in the colony of Eritrea , and issued August 10 , 1S90 : 

Article 1. — The mints of the kingdom a^re authorized to stamp special decimal 
coins which shall have legal currency only in the territory of Eritrea, and shall con- 
sist of pieces of 1 Eritrean thaler, -ft,-, Atu rfor, and y&o of such a thaler. These 
pieces shall be equivalent respectively to the Italian 5-lire piece, the 2-lire, 1-lira, 
50-centisimi silver pieces and the 10 and 5-centisimi bronze pieces. 

Article 2. — The Eritrean thaler (equivalent to 5 Italian lire) shall have a diam- 
eter of 40 millimetres. Its legal weight shall be 28.125 grams, and its fineness 
The tolerance of weight shall be and that of fineness nftnr over and under. 
The face of this piece shall bear the royal effigy, crowned, looking to the right, and 
in the exergue the legend Humbert I, King of Italy, with the year of the coinage. 
On the reverse it shall bear the eagle of Savoy with the indication of its value in 
Italian, Amaric, and Arabic. The edge shall be milled. 

Article 3. The silver submultiples of the Eritrean thaler of 5 lire, that is, the 
divisional coins of -fa, and tV of a thaler — the equivalents of the Italian 2-lire, 
1-lira, and 50-centisimi pieces — shall conform to the provisions concerning fineness, 
weight, diameter, and the tolerances of manufacture of articles 1 and 3 of the law of 
August 24, 1862. The imprint on their face shall be similar to that on the thaler ; on 
the reverse there shall be above “Colonia Eritrea;” below two branches; in the > 
center the star of Italy with the value of the piece in Italian, Amaric, and Arabic. 
The edge shall be milled. 

Article 4. The fractional bronze coins, that is, the pieces of and tAtj of a thaler, 
equivalent to the 10 and 5 centisimi Italian pieces, shall be coined in full conformity 
with the law of August 24, 1862, No. 788, as to alloy, weight, diameter, and toler- 
ance of manufacture. They shall bear on the face the royal effigy, crowned, look- 
ing to the left, with the legend Umberto I, Re d’ Italia, and the year of coinage; the 
reverse and the edge shall be like those of the coins mentioned in article 3. 

Article 5. The Eritrean thaler, equal intrinsically to the 5-lire piece of the King- 
dom, shall have full legal-tender power, and shall be received by all public treasuries 
and by individuals without any limit as to amount. 

No one- shall be obliged to receive as payment a sum greater than 10 Eritrean 
thalers, or 50 lire, in the silver coins mentioned in article 3, but the public treas- 
uries in Eritrea shall receive them for any amount. 

Article 6. The treasury of the colony of Naples shall exchange at sight for Italian 
coins the coins of the Eritrean colony. 

Article 7. Future royal decrees shall determine the proportional quantity of 
pieces of silver and bronze to be specially coined for the Eritrean colony of the de- 
nominations mentioned in articles 3 and 4. 

We order that the present decree, with the seal of the state thereto attached, be in- 
serted in the official collection of laws and decrees of the Kingdom of Italy, and that 
all persons be commanded to observe it and cause it to be observed. 

Given at Monya the 10th of August, 1890. 

Umberto. 

Royal decree No. 7050 , referred to above, in answer to question No. 2. 
i Sole Article. 

The coinage of divisional coins for the colony of Eritrea shall be of the nominal 
value 6,000,000 lire, to wit : 1,000,000 pieces of A<r of a thaler, or 2, 000, 000 lire ; 3,000,000 
pieces of of a thaler, or 3,000,000 lire ; 2,000,000 pieces of As of a thaler, or 1,000,000 

lire. 



GREECE. 



Legation of tite United States, 

Athens , January 26, 1891 . 

Sir: In conformity with the circular letter of the Department of State, dated De- 
cember 10, 1890, requesting answers to certain interrogatories propounded by the 
Secretary of the Treasury, I beg to submit the following relating to the Kingdom of 
Greece : 

As soon as the data from Roumania and Servia are received they will be forwarded 
to your office. 

I am, yours obediently, 

A. Loudon Snowden. 

The Director of the Mint, 

Washington, D. C, 

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REI'ORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF TIIE MINT. 



23 C> 



Jnsn>r» to in t* rrtHjotnncz, 1^*0, 

(1 ami 2) No gold or silver coins were issued during the last calendar year. 

(?>) There was practically no change in the amount of gold in the country during 
last year. 

(1) No silver imported: about $7,000 worth of silver ore was exported by the 
Hellenic Smelting Company and the French Laurinm Mining Company. 

(.*») No gold produced from mines. 

(0) There was produced about 23,474 kilograms in silver. 

(7) About $100,000 in coin. 

(8) About $700,000 in coin. 

(9) The circulating medium of Greece is an enforced paper currency. This circu- 
lation is divided into two classes, which are designated ‘‘full” and “ divisional.” 

The “full” embrace all notes of ten drachmas and over, and are divided into two 
classes; one issued by certain designated banks for the Government, and the other 
issued by and on account of the banks. 

The “divisional” notes are of the denomination of one and two drachmas, issued 
by the banks on Government account, and are as a corollary of the enforced paper 
currency, to be replaced by silver as soon as the credit of the country brings the 
notes to a par with gold and silver. 

The total notes issued and in circulation on the 31st of December, 1890, were as 
follows : 



FULL’’ NOTES, GOVERNMENT ISSUE. 



Issued through — 


Drachmas. 




53,493,335 
1, 874,906 
1, 504,463 


Ionian bank 


rpimtiif^nlian bank _ ... . .. 


Total 


. 56, 872, 704 





“FULL” NOTES ISSUED BY BANKS. 



National bank 

Ionian bank 

Epirothessalian bank 



44, 130, 953 
7, 040, 081 
4, 164, 967 



Total 



55, 336, 001 



“DIVISIONAL” NOTES ISSUED FOR THE GOVERNMENT BY THE BANKS. 





7. 400. 000 
3, 342, 453 

3. 500. 000 




Epirothessalian bank 




Total 


14, 242, 453 



Making a total circulation of 126,450,158 drachmas. 



SPAIN. 

Legation of the United States, 

Madrid , April 20, 1891 . 

Sir : I have the honor to inclose with this the information asked for in the State 
1 lepartment’s circular dated December 10, 1890, together with the note and transla- 
tion of same which accompanied the report. 

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, 

E. Burd Grubb. 

The Director of the Mint, 

Washington , D. C, 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



237 



Ministry of State, 
Palace, April 21, 1891. 

Excellency : In answer to your note dated December 26, ultimo, relative to the 
money and fiduciary circulation in Spain, I have the honor to hand to your excel- 
lency the inclosed data, which have been sent me by the minister of finance. 

I avail myself of this opportunity to reiterate to yonr excellency the testimony of 
my highest consideration. 

The Duke of Tetuan. 

The Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States. 



Answe?‘8 to interrogatories, 1890 . 



(1) 46,888,960 pesetas, in 20-peseta coins were coined. 

Recoined. 



Spanish coins : Pesetas. 

Isabelinas of 100 reals 498, 684. 70 

Ounces 268, 244. 84 



Total 766, 929. 54 



Foreign coins : 

Marks and eagles 629. 30 

Pounds sterling 1, 585, 688. 97 

20-franc coins 70, 149. 59 



Total 1, 656, 467. 86 



(2) Spanish Coins. 



Pesetas. 

In Isabella II coins 4, 385, 000 

In Isabella II columnary 670, 000 

In Isabella II effaced 1, 325, 000 

In Isabella H half dollars 1 , 284. 000 



Total 7, 664, 000 



(3 and 4) Importation and Exportation. 



Importation. 


Kilograms. 


Pesetas. 


Gold in ingots 


7.654 




Gold in coins 


3, 252, 233 


Silver in ingots 


68.479 


Silver in coins 


4, 687, 708 







Exportation : 

Silver in ingots and coins - hectograms. . 252. 614 

(5 and 6) There does not exist neither in the mint nor in the general direction any 
data in order to answer these questions. 

(7) Government and bank notes outstanding on December 27, according to its 
balance of account, 730,935,000 pesetas. 

(8) During the year 1890 no laws whatever have been passed relating to coinage, 
issue, or legal tender character of the metallic and paper circulation. 

(9) The mint, as yet, has not published any report, annual memorandum, or report 
prepared by other mints. 

The director-general of the treasury, 

Olegario dk Andrade. 

Madrid, March 28, 1891. 



Legation of the United States, 

Madrid, July 19, 1891 . 

Sir: I have the honor to inform you that in accordance with a law duly passed by 
the Cortes and signed by the Queen Regent on July 14, 1891, the Bank of Spain is 
authorized to issue notes payable to bearer to the amount of 1,500,000,000 pesetas, 
provided that the bank keeps in its vaults the third part of said amount in bars of 
gold or silver, and one-half of said part in gold. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The smallest note is to be 25 pesetas. The Bank of Spain, established by a decree 
dated March 19, 1874, is to continue in existence up to December 31, 1921. 

In return for these concessions said bank will provide the public treasury witlx 
150,000,000 pesetas, without interest, and without the right to recover said amount 
until the 31st day of December, 1921. 

Of said 150,000,000, 87,000,000 shall be expended in the construction of war vessels 
according to the law passed July 7, 1888. 

Of the remaining 63,000,000, the following sums shall be expended : 



Pesetas. 

For war material 16, 000, 000 

Subsidies to railroads 36, 000, 000 

Harbors 6, 000, OOO 

Canals 2,000,000 

Works to prevent inundations 3, 000, OOO 



Total 63,000,000 



The Spanish estimate of receipts and expenditures was not debated or voted in 
the Cortes, and, under the constitutional provision, will be the same as for the past 
year, of which I observe a copied statement in full was sent to the Department. 

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, 

E. Bukd Grubb. 

The Secretary of State. 



PORTUGAL. 



Legation of the United States, 

Lisbon, June SO, 1891 . 

Sir: In compliance with a circular from the Department of State received Jan- 
uary 15 last, I herewith inclose replies to the interrogatories therein contained. 

I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

Geo. S. Batcheller. 

The Director of the Mint, 

Treasury Department, Washington, D. C, 



Answers to interrogatories, 1890, 



(1) The amount of gold coined, denomination, and values: Reis. 

2,900 pieces of 10,000 reis each, value 29, 000, 000 

09,600 pieces of 5,000 reis each, value 348, 000, 000 



Withdrawn from circulation 377, 000, 000 



(2) 480,000 pieces of 500 tfeis, value 240, 000, 000 

700,000 pieces of 200 reis, value 140, 000, 000 

700,000 pieces of 100 reis, value 70, 000, 000 

1,000,000 pieces of 50 reis, value . . , 50, 000, 000 



All foreign coins withdrawn from eireulat ion % 500, 000, 000 

(3) Gold coin imported -* 14, 089, 446, 000 

Gold bullion imported 113, 058, 000 

Gold coin exported 10, 448, 600, 000 

(4) Silver coin imported 127, 000, 000 

Silver bullion imported 332, 000, 000 

Silver coin exported 189, 800, 000 



(5 and 6) No mines. 

(7) Approximate, £10,000,000. 

(8) Approximate, £2,500,000. 

(9) Circulation outstanding, 8,649,871,000 reis. 

(10) No law's affecting the coining w ere passed. 

(11) The director of the mint, Lisbom transmits regularly to the Director of the 
Mint, Washington, all official reports of the mint of Portugal. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



239 



AUSTRIA-HUNGARY. 

Legation of the United States, 

Vienna , April 30, 1891. 

Sir: In pursuance of instructions received from the Department of State in 
December last, application was made by this legation, in the proper quarter, for 
certain data respecting the coinage of Austria-Hungary in 1890. On the 27th instant 
a report upon the subject in question was received from the imperial and royal 
ministry or foreign affairs, and I now have the honor of inclosing to you an accu- 
rate translation of the same for your information. 

It will be observed that certain other statistics, bearing upon the subject of coin- 
age in Austria-Hungary, are promised so soon as they can be prepared. 

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, 

% John J. Chew, 

Chary 6 (V Affaire* ad interim . 

The Director of the Mint, 

Washington , D . C. 



Vienna, April $5, 1891. 

Hon. John J. Chew, 

ChargS d’ Affaires ad interim of the United States of America : 

In reply to the esteemed note of January 5 last, No. 65, in which a desire was 
expressed to obtain certain data respecting the coinage of Austria-Hungary in 1890, 
the ministry of foreign affairs now has the honor of placing at the disposition of the 
charge d'affaires ad interim of the United States of America the statements pub- 
lished by the imperial mint at Vienna and by the royal mint at Kremnitz in 1890, as 
well as the results obtained by the inquiries which were made, in order to answer 
the questions proposed. 



Answers to interrogatories , 1890. 



(1) There were coined, at the imperial mint of Vienna, during 1890, gold coins at 
the value of 3,063,935.25 florins. In this value are comprised: 



Florins. 

Domestic coins 823, 580 

Foreign coins 1,090,149 



A kilogram of gold being valued at 1,395 florins. 

(2) At the imperial mint of Vienna there were coined during 1890 silver coins at 
the value of 5,980,528.08 florins, namely : 



Florins. 

Legal coin of the realm 4, 371, 246. 00 

Trade coin 985, 165. 88 

Fractional currency 624, 116. 20 

In this value are comprised : 

Florins. 

Domestic coins 1,091,005.00 • 

Fractional coins 624, 116. 20 

Foreign coins 166, 406. 00 



(3) The import of gold into Austria-Hungary, not including articles of industry, 
amounted to : 



Coins and medals 

Raw gold and in bars 
Gold scrapings 



Kilograms. 

27, 870 

529 

.... 14,421 



Total 



42, 820 



The export of gold from Austria-Hungary, not including articles of industry, 
amounted to : 

Kilograms. 



Coins and medals 2, 652 

Raw gold 1 

Scrapings 3,080 

Gold ore 11, 600 



Total 17, 33$ 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



(4) The import of silver into Austria-Hungary, not including articles of industry, 
amounted to : 

Kilograms, 



Coins and medals 5, 066 

Raw silver and in bars 23, 122 

Old and broken silver 97 

Scrapings 13, 543 



Total 



41,828 



The export of silver from Austria-Hungary, not including articles of industry, 
amounted to : 

Kilograms. 



Coins and medals 938 

Raw silver and in bars 106 

Broken silver 23 

Scrapings - • 8, 923 

Ore 1, 700 



Total 



11,690 



(5 and 6) The exact figures of the products of the gold and silver mines during 
the year 1890 will be transmitted to the charge d’affaires ad interim as soon as they 
have been ascertained. The redemptions made during that space of time at the 
imperial mint of Vienna, from the mines of Austria, amounted to 12.4529 kilo- 
grams fine gold, valued at 17,371.79 florins, and from the silver mines of Austria to 
34,629.797 kilograms of fine silver, valued at 3,116,681 florins. 

(7) At the end of the year 1890 the amount of coined gold at the imperial and 
royal government vaults and at the imperial mint was equal in value to 7,310,995.30 
Austrian florins. 

The Austro-Hungarian bank held at that time in real gold 54,047,000 florins, not 
including gold bonds to the amount of 24,967,000 florins. And the supply of un- 
coined gold held at the same time by the imperial mint amounted to 899,321.48 
florins, when calculating a kilogram of gold at 1,395 florins. 

The amount of gold in possession of private individuals it would be impossible to 
estimate. 

(8) The amount of coined silver on hand at the end of the year 1890 at the gov- 
ernment vaults and the imperial mint at Vienna amounted to the sum of 6,793,082.90 
florins. There were deposited at the same time, in the Austro-Hungarian bank, 
165,476,000 florins of real silver, and the supply of uncoined silver held by the im- 
perial mint amounted to 2,299,285.26 florins, calculating a kilogram of silver at 90 
florins. 

(9) The circulation of state notes issued under common guaranty of both parts of 
the empire was, at the end of the year 1890, 370,361,103 florins. The circulation of 
the bank notes issued by the Austro-Hungarian bank amounted*at the same time to 
445,934,210 florins. 

(10) No new laws were passed during 1890 relating to the coinage, the circulation, 
or the character of the metal and paper currency in circulation. 

(11) No other reports on coinage and the operations of the imperial mint are pub- 
lished except the tabulated statement herewith inclosed. 

Statements showing the products of the Austrian gold and silver mines, as well as 
information on the same subject for the Hungarian part of the monarchy, will be 
submitted to the charg6 d’affaires ad interim of the United States as soon as received. 

The undersigned avails himself of this occasion to renew to the charge d’affaires 
the assurance of his highest esteem. 



Statement Showing the Coinage at the Royal Hungarian Mint at Krem- 

nitz during 1890. 



Coins. 


Number of 
pieces. 


Amount in 
Austrian 
florins and 
kreutzers. 


I. Silver : 


2, 021, 792 


2, 021, 792. 00 


H. Gold: 

8-florin pieces (fl. 8.10) 


329, 221 
28, 989 


2,666,690.10 

117,405.45 


4-florin pities ^fl 4.05) .... 


Total gold 


358, 210 
2, 380, 002 


2.784.095.55 

4.805.887.55 


Tl*f ill ... . . 





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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



241 



Statement Showing the Coinage at the Imperial Mint at Vienna During 

1890. 



Goins. 


Number of 
pieces. 


Amount in 
Austrian 
florins and 
kreutzers. 


I. Silver: < 


103, 680 
4,163,886 


207, 360. 00 
4, 163, 886. 00 






4, 267, 566 


| 4,371,246.00 


II. Trade coins: 


468, 050 


985, 165. 88 


HI. Gold: 

Quadruple ducats (fl- 19.20) 


47, 289 
373, 860 
43,151 
! 2, 947 


907, 948. 80 
1, 794, 528. 00 
349, 523. 10 
11, 935. 35 


Single ducats (fl. 4.80) 


8-florin pieces (fl. 8.10) 


4-florin pieces (fl. 4.05) 




Total gold 


1 467, 247 


3, 063, 935. 25 


Fractional currency : 

10-kreutzer pieces 

1-kreutzer pieces 


I 6, 241, 162 
1 9,101,000 


624,116.20 
91, 010. 00 


Total coinage 


| 20, 545, 025 


j 9,135,473.33 



Vienna, June 6, 1891 . 

In pursuance of the note of April 25, last, relative to the coinage of Austria- 
Hungary in 1890, the minister of foreign affairs has the honor of transmitting the 
following information on the above-mentioned subject for the countries of the Hun- 
garian crown. 

Answers to interrogatories t 1890. 

(1) During the calendar year 1890 there were coined at the royal hungarian mint 
at Kremnitz 358,210 gold coins, amounting in value to 2,784,095 florins, 55 kreutzers; 
of these there were 329,221 20-franc and 28,984 10-franc pieces. No recoinage of 
domestic or foreign pieces. 

(2) There were coined 2,021,792 1-florin silver coins. No recoinage of foreign silver 
pieces. Of domestip silver coins withdrawn from circulation there were recoined 
pieces weighing in all 501.5595 kilograms at the value of 45,140 florins and 27 
kreutzers. 

(5) The gold produced by the Hungarian mines weighed 2,091.062 kilograms at the 
value of 2,917,003 florins and 54 kreutzers. 

(6) The silver produced by the Hungarian mines weighed 15,983.543 kilograms at 
the value of 1,438,518 florins and 87 kreutzers. 

(10 and 11) No new laws were published during 1890 affecting the coinage, the 
character, or the circulation of metal or paper currency, nor was there any report 
published by the mint relating to its labors. 

The undersigned avails himself of this opportunity to renew to the envoy from 
the United States of America the assurance of his most distinguished consideration. 

Glauz. 

Hon. Frederick D. Grant, 

Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary 

of the United States of America. 



United States Legation, 

Vienna , June 15, 1891. 

Sir : Referring to dispatches numbered 151 and 157, under dates of April 30 and 
June 8 last, from this legation, containing translations of reports received from the 
imperial and royal ministry of foreign affairs on the coinage of Austria-Hungary 
during the year 1890, I now have the honor to transmit translation of a note, this 
day received from the foreign office, giving the total production of gold and silver 
of the Austrian mines during the same period of time. 

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant. 

F. D, Grant. 

The Secretary of State, 

Washington , D. C • 

10285 M 16 



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242 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Vienna, June 12, 1891 

Supplementary to the note of the 6th instant, containing statements relative to 
the coinage of Austria-Hungary in the year 1890, the imperial and royal ministry of 
foreign affairs has the honor of making known to the envoy extraordinary and min- 
ister plenipotentiary of the United States of America that the product of the Aus- 
trian mines in the year 1890 amounted to 21.5734 kilograms of gold, and to 35,862.696 
kilograms of silver. 

The undersigned avails himself at the same time of the occasion to renew to the 
envoy of the United States the assurance of his most distinguished consideration. 

For the minister of foreign affairs, 

Glauz. 

Hon. Frederick D. Grant, 

Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary 

of the United States of America, 



United States Legation, 

Vienna, June 23, 1891, 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the following statements concerning the currency 
of this monarchy for your information. 

The circulating medium of Austria-Hungary is paper, issued partly by the gov- 
ernments and partly by banks, and, until recently, this paper has been based upon 
silver. Formerly the credit of the monarchy caused this paper to pass at a depre- 
ciated value, but some three years ago it became redeemable at par, in silver gul- 
dens or florins, ninety of which weighed 1 kilogram or 2.2 pounds. 

The great industry of the Kingdom of Hungary is agriculture, and during the 
time that there was much difference in the relative value of gold and silver it was 
to the advantage of the land-owners there to retain a silver currency, inasmuch as 
the wages they paid to the laborer who produced their crops was silver, while their 
surplus was marketed in central Europe, where the nations maintain a currency 
based upon gold, the gain in exchanging the two metals being an important part of 
the Hungarian land-owners’ profits. Upon the other hand imperial Austria is a 
manufacturing country, and much of the raw materials consumed in the industrial 
arts was purchased abroad with gold, while the products of the factories were natur- 
ally marketed within the monarchy, where silver was received for them. 

One can readily see why Hungary was satisfied with a currency based upon silver, 
while the Austrian part of the monarchy agitated a change to a gold basis. 

Last summer, probably on account of prospective legislation in the Uni ted' States 
which would affect silver, the relative value of the two precious metals came so near 
together that the two governments forming this monarchy agreed to nominate legis- 
lative committees to meet and discuss the subject of a currency basis and, if possible, 
to arrange a coinage which would be satisfactory to those engaged in these two 
before-mentioned classes of industry. As an outcome of these discussions the two 
governments agreed, last week, to make gold their standard in the future. 

Having agreed upon gold as the future standard for the coinage of Austria-Hungary, 
a new difficulty appears. The governments of this monarchy have been coining, for 
many years past, a principal gold piece — “the Franz- Josefs d’or” — of the value of 8 
florins and 10 kreutzers. This coin was made of the same weight as the 20-franc 
piece and it circulates as 20 francs in Belgium, France, Switzerland, Italy, and 
Greece. Now the question arises, Shall the value of the future florin have the value 
of the present gold or the present silver florin f 

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, 

F. D. Grant. 

The Secretary of State, 

Washington , D, C, 



GERMANY. 



Legation of the United States of America, 

Bei lin, March 23, 1891, 

Sir: The legation transmits herewith for your use a document just received from 
Mr. Conrad, director of the Prussian mint, which contains a statement of the coin- 
age of the German mints during the year 1890. 

I remain, sir, your obedient servant, 

C. Coleman, 



The Director of the Mint, 

Treasury Department, Washington, D, C, 





REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



243 



Answers to interrogatories, 1890. 

(1) There were coined : 

• Marks. 

In double crowns % 73, 895, 080 

In crowns 26, 254, 130 

Total 100,149,210 

404,230 marks of retired imperial gold coins, no longer capable of circulation, were 
recoined. 

6,306.19 pounds fine, in the shape of foreign gold coins, were deposited in the Ger- 
man mints for recoinage into imperial gold coins. 

(2) There was no coinage of silver. 

(3 and 4) The definitive figures of the imports and exports of gold and silver into 
the German customs union were, according to the June number of the Monatshefte 
zur Statistik des Deutschen Reichs, as follows: 



(A) GOLD. 

Imports: 

Gold coined 

Gold un wrought and in bars 

Exports : 

Gold coined 

Gold unwrought and in bars 



Kilograms, net. 

32,542 

7,323 



13, 578 
2,712 



(B) SILVER. 

Imports: 

Silver coined 23,454 

Silver un wrought and in bars 42, 549 

Exports: 

Silver coined 2, 558 

Silver unwrought and in bars 279,842 

(C) PAG AMENT, BROKEN GOLD AND BROKEN SILVER. 

Imports: 28,201 kilograms, net, of the calculated value of 13,621,000 marks. 

Exports: 32 kilograms, net, of the calculated value of 16,000 marks. 

(D) GOLD AND SILVER COMPLETELY DECLARED. 

Imports: Nil. 

Exports : 83 kilograms, net, of the calculated value of 51,000 marks. 

(5 and 6) The production of the smelting works of Germany amounted, according 
to the provisional figures published in the February number of the Monatshefte 
zur Statistik des Deutschen Reichs, to about — 



Metal, 


Kilograms. 


Value. 


(a) Pur© gold 


1,851 

402,256 


Marks. 

5, 151, 000 
56,060,000 


(6) Pur© silver . . 





How much of this came from the working of foreign ores can not be stated. 

(7) The amount of the imperial gold coins stamped, less the pieces retired until 
that date, because no longer capable of circulation, was 2,528,328,445 marks. How 
much this amount was decreased by exportation to foreign countries by employment 
in the arts and other causes can not be determined. 

The stock of bar gold and foreign gold coins in the Imperial Bank on the 31st of 
December, 1890, amounted to 236,532,000 marks. 

(8) The total amount of imperial silver coins stamped up to the end of December, 
1890, less the pieces retired, amounted to 452,233,935 marks. How much of this 
amount was withdrawn from circulation for use in the arts or by other causes can 
not be determined. 

There is, besides, a remainder of 1-thaler pieces, partly Gerfnan and partly of Aus- 
trian coinage, variously estimated at from 400,000,000 to 450,000,000 marks, in circu- 
lation or in the stocks of the banks and public treasuries. 

(9) At the end of December, 1890, there were in circulation 122,908,940 marks, as 
follows : 19,909,950 marks in the denomination of 5 marks ; 29,999,940 in the denomi- 
nation of 20 marks ; 72,909,050 in the denomination of 50 marks. 

In accordance with the law of April 30, 1874 (R. G. Bl., p. 40), the further retire- 
ment of 2,908,940 marks has been effected, so that there will shortly be in permanent 
circulation 120,000,000 marks in imperial treasury notes in denominations as follows : 
20,000,000 marks in the denomination of 5 marks; 30,000,000 in the denomination ol 
20 marks; 70,000,000 iu the denomination of 50 marks. The circulation of bink 
notes, which is regulated by the hank law of March 14, 1875 (R. G. Bl., p. 177), 
amounted, at the end of 1890, in round numbers, to 1,294,817,000 marks. 

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7l0) No. 

(11) No mint report has been published. 




244 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Table of the Coinages of the German Mints up to the end of the Calendar 

Year 1890. 





Gold coins. 


Of the gold 
coins there 
were coined 
on private 
account. 


There were coined— 


1 

Double kronen. 


Kronen. 


1 Half kronen. 


To the end of 1889 


1 Marks. 

1,926,525,040 


Marks. 
476, 294, 290 


Marks. 

27, 969, 925 


Marks. 

1, 109, 517, 290 



In the year 1890 — 

In Berlin 

In Munich 

In Stuttgart . . 
In Karlsruhe . 
In Hamburg. . 



73, 895, 080 



1C, G57, 100 1 
4,219,650 j 



1,400, 000 



730,000 I. 
2,447,380 . 



90, 150, 460 
4, 219, 650 
1,400,000 
730,000 
2, 447, 380 



Total 1890 i 73, 895, 080 | 25, 454, 130 | 

Total up to the end of 1890 | 2, 000, 420, 120 | 501, 748, 420 j 


1 27,969,925 j 

1>779G9,925 j 


98,947,490 
1, 208, 464,780 


There were coined — 


Silver coins. 


1 5 mark 

pieces. 


2-mark 

pieces. 


1-mark 

pieces. 


j 50-pfennig 
pieces. 


20-pfennig 

pieces. 


To the end of 1889 


Marks. 

74, 104, 195 


Marks. 
104, 964, 606 


Marks. 
178, 990, 334 


1 

, Marks. \ 
! 71,486,552 ! 


1 Marks. 

35, 717, 922. 80 



Total up to the end of 1890 . 



74, 104, 195 



104,964,606 I 178,990,334 71,48G,552 ] 35,717,922.80 



There were 
coined— 



To the end of 1889 . 



In the year 1890— I 

In Berlin ! 

In Munich... 
In Dresden . . 
In Stuttgart . 
In Karlsruhe 
In Hamburg . j 



543,140. 40 
140, 618. 60 
74, 060. 80 
100, 55!). 20 
61, 190.00 
81,936. 00 



Total 1890.. 1,002,105.00 



Total up to 
the end of 
1890 



4, 005, 284. 00 



687.814.00 , 



60, 100. 00 
97, 600. 00 
163,730.60 



1,009,244.60 



28, 239, 718. 30 



227, 397. 95 
123. 051.30 
65, 000. 00 
39, 800. 00 
47, 400. 00 
81.457.95 



j Nickel coins. 


Copper coins. 


Total. 

1 

1 


, 20-pfennig 1 
pieces. 


10-pfennig | 
pieces. j 


5- pfennig 
pieces. 


2-pfennig j 1-pfennig 
pieces. pieces. 


Marks. 

. [ 3, 003, 179. 00 


tc 

Is 

4». -! 
© 


Marks. 

13, 343, 950. 15 


Marks. 1 Marks. 
6,213,207.44 | 4,784. 147.61 


Marks. 

2, 060, 680, 628 






584, 107. 20 i 



13,928, 057.35 



1 6, 213, 207. 44 



172. 147. 
70, 300. 
37,301. 
39, 2 4. 
30,504. 
22. 469. 



36, 797, 035 
10, 616,174 
5, 403, 734 
5, 969, 286 
5, 353, 428 
6, 167, 869 



372.822.44 



70, 307, 526 



5, 156, 970. 05 2, 130, 988, 154 



Up to the end of 1890. 



In Berlin 

Iu Hanover 

In Frankfort - on- the- 

Main 

In Munich 

In Dresden 

In Stuttgart 

In Karlsruhe 

In Darmstadt 

In Hamburg 

Total at the end 
of 1890.. 



Gold coins. Silver coins. Nickel coins. 



Mark*. 
1,488,404,460 I 
191, 656, 420 | 

251,491,830 
173,268,175 
83, 984, 320 
97,691,705 
56, 721, 385 
33, 241.310 
153, 678, 860 



Marks. 

162, 460, 930. 10 
50, 633, 984. 00 

41,510,222.10 
62, 613, 199. 80 

28.673.682.00 
44,576.390.90 
30, 477, 851. 60 ] 

13.631.377.00 
30, 685, 972. 30 I 



Marks. 

14. 989. 249. 45 

3, 006, 071. 70 

4, 930, 433. 90 
6,341, 130. 65 
3, 635, 115. 30 
4, 275, 630. 30 
3, 544, 516. 65 
1, 272, 684. 90 
4, 180, 226. 80 



I 



2, 530, 138, 465 465, 263, 609. 80 



46, 173, 059. 65 



Copper coins. 



I 



Total. 



Marks. 
4,119,608. 85 
1, 097, 396. 60 

1, 803, 516. 28 
1,134,465. 35 
689, 088. 43 
951, 758. 54 
750. 698. 47 
278, 179. 59 
545, 465. 38 



11, 370, 177. 49 



Marks. 

1, 669, 974, 248. 40 
246, 393, 872. 30 

299, 736, 002. 28 
243, 356. 970. 80 
116, 982, 205. 73 
147,493, 484.74 
91,494,451.72 
48, 423, 551. 72 
189, 090, 524. 48 



! 



3, 052, 945, 311. 94 



The director of the Royal Prussian mint institutions. 



Berlin, February IS'Jl. 

C. Conrad. 



/ 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 245 

Coins Struck at the Royal Mint in Berlin for the Egyptian Government 

up to the end of 1889. 



I. Gold coins : Piasters. 

100-piaster 5,202,400 

II. Silver coins : 

20-piaster 20, 000, 000 

10-piaster 49, 345, 650 

5-piaster 20, 977, 050 

2-piaster 10, 000, 000 

1-piaster 8, 191, 535 



i HI. Nickel coins (Ochr-el-gnerche 

pieces) : Piasters. 

5-Ochr-el-guerche II , 005, 790. 00 

2-Ochr-el-guerche 1, 041, 884. 40 

1-Ochr-el-guerclie 574, 167. 50 

IV. Bronze coins (Ochr-el-guerche 
pieces) : 

• J-Ochr-el-guereho 428,089.70 

j i-Ochr-el-giierclie 103, 630, 125 



Egyptian Coins Struck for the German East African Company in the 

Year 1890. 



1. Silver coins rupees.. 154,394 

2. Copper coins pesas . . 1, 000, 000 

The director of the Royal Prussian mint institutions, 

C. Conrad. 



NETHERLANDS. 
Answers to interrogatories, JSOO, 



(1) None. 

(2) Four hundred and ninety-five thousand florins of various denominations and 
values, of which 210, 000 florins were recoined for domestic use, and 285, 000 florins 
were coined from silver ingots for foreign use. 

(3 and 4) Imports and Exports of Gold and Silver. 



Metals. 



Gold coin 

Gold bullion . 

Gold ore 

Silver coin — 
Silver bullion 
Silver ore 



I Imports. 


Exports. 




Florins. 


Florins. 




4, 970, 947 


16,990 




1, 554, 098 


549,000 


2. 200 


1, 567 


627, 243 


7, 630, 000 


697, 252 


500 


48, 200 


41,000 



(5) None was produced. 

(6) None was produced. 

(7) Forty-seven million five hundred and ninety-four thousand four hundred and 
sixty florins in 10-guilder pieces, of which 23,291,720 florins were on deposit at the 
Bank of the Netherlands. 

(8) One hundred and sixteen million seven hundred and thirteen thousand four 
hundred and twenty-three florins in standard coins, and 7,616,174.25 florins in small 
silver coins ; 65,498,690 florins of the former were on deposit at the Bank of the Nether- 
lands. 

(9) Fifteen million florins in Government notes, and 195,160,615 in hank notes. 

(10) The law of July 21, 1890, is herewith inclosed. 

(11) A copy of the annual report from the mint is transmitted as often as it ap- 
pears, to the Director of the Mint at Washington, direct from the Netherlands official 
bureau. 

law of the 21st of JULY, 1890, to increase the maximum amount of small 

SILVER COIN FOR THE DUTCH INDIES. 

SOLE ARTICLE. 

The maximum fixed by the law of the 24th of December, 1857 (Staatsblad, No. 173), 
of the small silver coin to he issued for the Dutch Indies, is hereby increased by 
5,000,000 florins, so that it is now brought up to the amount of 17,000,000 florins. 



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246 



REPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Legation of the United States, 

The Hague , August SI , 1891. 

Sir: I have the honor to state, that on a recent occasion while paying a visit te 
the Royal Museum at The Hague, I discovered three medals, which, by reason of 
their relation to prominent events in our early history and other considerations 
hereafter alluded to, render it proper that I should bring them to the notice of the 
Department. 

The first medal in the series referred to was designed to commemorate the recogni- 
tion of American Independence by the province of Friesland, on the 26th of Feb- 
ruary, 1782, a description of which is as follows : 

On the obverse side is a male figure personating a Frisian in ancient costume, join- 
ing right hands with an American, represented by a maiden in aboriginal dress 
standing on a scepter, with her left hand resting on a shield bearing the inscription : 
“The United States of North America ;” while with his left hand the Frisian sig- 
nals his rejection of an olive branch offered by a Briton — Briton represented by a 
maiden accompanied by a tiger, the left hand of the maiden resting on a shield hav- 
ing the inscription, “Great Britain.” 

On the reverse side is the figure of an arm projecting from the clouds, holding the 
coat of arms of the province of Friesland, under which is the inscription: “ To the 
State of Friesland in grateful recognition of the acts of the assemblies in February 
and April, 1782, by the Burgher's Club, Leenwarden. Liberty and Zeal.” 

The second medal in this series was struck by order of the States General in com- 
memoration of its recognition of the Independence of the United States. 

On the obverse side of the medal will be found the United States and the Nether- 
lands, represented by two maidens equipped for war, with right hands joined over a 
burning altar. The Dutch maiden is placing an emblem of freedom on the head of 
the American, whose right foot attached to a broken chain rests on England, repre- 
sented by a tiger. In the field of the medal are the word : “ Libera Soror, Solemni 
Deer. Agn.” 

On the reverse side is the figure of the unicorn lying prostrate before a steep rock 
against which he has broken his horn; over the figure are the words: “Tyrannis 
virtute repnlsa,” and underneath the same the words: “ Sub Gallia auspiciis.” 

The third medal in the series was made to commemorate the treaty of commerce 
and navigation entered into between the United States and the Netherlands the 7th 
of October, 1782. 

On its obverse side stands in relief a monumental needle bearing the Amsterdam 
coat of arms, upon which a wreath is being placed by a figure representing Mer- 
cury ; underneath the coat of arms is a parchment bearing the inscription : “ Pro. 
Dro. Mvs. ;” France, symbolized by a crowing cock, stands besides the needle point- 
ing with a conjurer's wand to a horn of plenty and an anchor. Over all are the 
words : “ Justitiam et non temnere divos.” 

On the reverse side is an image of Fame riding on a cloud and carrying the arms 
of the Netherlands and the United States, surmounted by a naval crown. The 
figures are covered by the following words: “Favstissimo foedere, junotce Die vn, 

Octob., MDCCLXXXn.” 

It will be remembered that John Adams, while discharging his duties at Paris as 
commissioner in arranging a treaty of peace and commerce with Great Britain, was, 
in the year 1780, appointed minister to the Netherlands ; also, that political compli- 
cations between Holland and England delayed his reception by the Government for 
more than two years after he first offered his credentials. 

The States General, oppressed by the magnitude of the responsibility ; refused to 

S ass upon the question until it had been submitted to each of the provinces for in- 
ividual action. 

Friesland, impelled by the Germanic love of freedom which had long characterized 
its people, took the initiative in the movement for recognition, passing an act to 
that effect on the 20th of February, A. D. 1782. Soon thereafter the remaining prov- 
inces followed her example, and on the 19th of April, 1782, the States General, in 
deference to the wishes of the provinces, received Mr. Adams's credentials. 

It will also be borne in mind that while a Dutch man-of-war first saluted the 
American flag, Holland stands second in the roll of foreign nations which formally 
recognized our independence, and the second with whom we made a treaty of com- 
merce and navigation. 

The medals in question possess interest in that they furnish the best evidence ex- 
tant of the current of opinion and sentiment at that time in the Netherlands con- 
cerning England and the United States, and are, moreover, worthy of speoial men- 
tion, inasmuch as I do not find them referred to in Mr. Adams's public correspondence 
or in any book published in our language. 

Through the courtesy of the Government I have been permitted to procure five 
copies of each of these medals, and take pleasure in transmitting them to the De- 
partment through the agency of the American Dispatch, London. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



247 



One set is designed for the Department of State ; 

One set for the New York Historical Society j 

One set for the Massachusetts Historical Society ; 

One set for the. Minnesota State Historical Society; and 

One set for the Holland Society of New York. 

Should the Department approve, the four last-mentioned sets may be forwarded to 
each of the above-named societies, with a copy of this dispatch. 

There can be no more interesting or profitable study for the citizen of the United 
States than the process of reasoning which led to our separate national existence 
and the adoption of the present iorm of government, or the motives which in- 
fluenced the people of other lands to welcome our advent into the family of nations. 

I have the honor to be, air, your obedient servant, 

Samuel R. Thayer. 

The Secretary of State, 

Washington , D. C. 

Note. — One set of these medals has been placed in the cabinet of the mint at Phila- 
delphia. 



DENMARK. 

Legation of the United States, 
Copenhagen, February 24, 1891. 

Sir: By instructions of the Secretary of State, in his circular dated December 10, 
1890, 1 have the honor to inclose herewith the statement of the Danish minister of 
finance in regard to coinage, amount of gold and silver on hand in 1890, etc., with a 
translation of the same.* 

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, 

Clark E. Carr. 

The Director of the Mint, 

Washington, D. C. 



Answers to interrogatories, 1890. 

(Extract from a report of the minister of finance to the minister of foreign affairs, dated February 

10 , 1891 .] 

(1) In 1890 there was coined in gold 102,226 20-crown pieces, amounting to 2,044,520 
crowns. There was none recoined. 

(2) There was no silver coined in 1890, and none melted down. 

(3) The imports of gold into Denmark are estimated at about 3,500,000 crowns ; 
the exports at 2,500,000 crowns. 

(4) We can not give any information as to imports and exports of silver. 

?5) There is neither gold nor silver found in Denmark. 

(6 and 7) The gold on hand in coin and bars was about 47,000,000 crowns at the 
close of the year 1890. 

(8) The silver on hand at the same period was about 20,000,000 crowns. 

(9) At the close of 1890, bank notes amounting to about 79,000,000 crowns were in 
circulation. 

(10) In 1890 there was no change made in the laws relating to coinage. 

(11) No such report has been published for 1890. 



NORWAY. 

Legation of the United States, 
Stockholm, May 7, 1891. 

Sir: In compliance with instructions received from the Department of State, I 
have the honor to make the following report upon the coinage and currency of the 
Kingdom of Norway during the calendar year 1890. 



We publish only the translation. 



Digitized by Google 




248 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



I have.translated and compiled the report from a memorial in the Norwegian lan- 
guage, kindly prepared by the minister of finance of Norway, and courteously fur- 
nished me by the minister of foreign affairs. 

I have the honor to be, sir, vonr obedient servant, 

W. W. Thomas, Jr., 
United States Minister . 



The Director of the Mint, 

Washington, 1). C, 



Answers 1o interrogatories, 1890. 

(1) No gold was coined or recoined. 

(2) Silver coins were struck to a value of 450,000 crowns, as follows, viz: 

Crowns. 



2-crown pieces 100, OOO 

1-crown pieces 200,000 

50-ore pieces 100, 000 

10-ore pieces 50, 000 



Total 450.000 



For this coinage there were melted old Norwegian coins to the value of 76,000 
crowns. Foreign coins are not used in the mint of Norway. 

(3 and 4) According to statistical reports, gold and silver, both coin and bullion, 
was imported to a value of 357,400 crowns ; exported, 52,500 crowns. These figures, 
however, are not considered absolutely exact. 

(5) Amount of gold produced from mines, if anything, was trifling. 

(6) At the mines of Kongsberg, the only silver mines in Norway which continue to 
be regularly w r orked, there was produced from July 1, 1889, to June 30, 1890, the 
amount of 5,538.9 kilograms fine silver, which was sold for 652,400 crowns. 

(7 and 8) The amount of precious metals held by the Bank of Norway at the close 
of the calendar year 1890 was 30,160,700 crowns, exclusively in gold. Up to that 
time there had been struck in Norway, in gold coin, 15,860,670 crowns, of which there 
had been withdrawn from circulation, as worn and broken, 4,500 crowns. Of silver 
coin there was in circulation 6,032,000 crowns, of which amount the chief office held 
304,500 crowns. 

(9) On December 31, 1890, there were in circulation notes of the Bank of Norway 
to the amount of 49,670,700 crowns. 

(10) No laws were passed during the year 1890 affecting the coinage, issue, or 
legal-tender character of the metallic or paper circulation. 

(11) I inclose herewith a Norwegian printed public document which includes a 
report of the operations of the Norwegian mint for the fiscal year from July 1, 1889, 
to June 30, 1890. 



SWEDEN. 

Legation of the United States, 

Stockholm , Mag 6’, 1891. 

Sir: In compliance with instructions received from the Department of State, I 
have the honor to make the following report upon the coinage and currency of the 
Kingdom of Sweden during the calendar year 1890. 

I have translated and compiled the report from a memorial in the Swedish lan- 
guage, kindly prepared by the minister of finance of Sweden, and courteously fur- 
rnislied me by the minister of foreign affairs. 

1 have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, 

W. W. Thomas, Jr. 

United States Minister. 

The Director of the Mint, 

Washington , D . C. 



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REPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



249 



Answers to interrogatories, 1890. 

(1) Gold coined, 155,491 20-crown pieces, of the value of 3,109,820 crowns. No 
gold coins, Swedish or foreign, were recoined or withdrawn from circulation. 

(2) Silver coins were struck to a value of 947,264.25 crowns, as follows, viz: 



Silver coins. 



2-crown pieces 
1-crown pieces 
25-ore pieces . . 
10-ore pieces . . 

Total ... 



Pieces, j 


Y alue. 




Crowns. 


71,887 


143, 774 


593,951 


593, 951 


469,417 


117,354 


921,850 


92. 185 


2, 057, 105 


I 947, 204 



Four hundred thousand two hundred and seventeen crowns in old Swedish silver 
coins were melted for recoining. No foreign silver coins were recoined. Four 
thousand eight hundred and ninety-three and seven-tenths crowns, struck accord- 
ing to the mint regulations of 1873, were also molted. 

(3 and 4) Imports and Exports. 



i 



Metals. 



I i 

[Kilograms. Crowns. 



Imports : 

Gold coin 

Un wrought gold 

Wrought goal 

Exports: 

Wrought gold 

There was no export ef gold coin or unwrought gold. 
Imports : 

Silver coin 

Un wrought silver 

Wrought silver 

Exports : 

Silver coin 

Unwrought silver 

Wrought silver - 



81 

21 



1 



1.770 

053 



602 

50 



9,000 



033, 6G2 



128, 000 



(5 and 6) Product of Mines. 



Gold.. 

Silver. 



Metals. 



Weight. 


Value. 


Kilos. 


Crowns. 


87.66 J 


217, 396. 80 


4,181.01 


*524, 382. 27 



i 



* At 125.42 er. j>er kilo. 



(7) Up to December 31, 1890, gold coins now current had been struck to a value 
of 57,841,055 crowns. Of this amount there was held in the banks 20,742,720 crowns, 
leaving a balance 37,098,335 crowns, of which a large portion has been exported. 

On the same day the banks held other gold coin and bullion to the value of 4,079,525 
crowns. The mint held 129,482 crowns, making a total of 4,209,007 crowns. 

(8) On December 31, 1890, there were in circulation within the kingdom silver 
coins, now current, to the value of 15,843,334 crowns; held in the Riks Bank (the 
National Bank of Sweden), 1,549,114 crowns, making a total of 17,392,448 crowns. 
The same day the mint held coined silver to the value of 128,950 crowns. 

(9) Government and bank notes outstanding at close of 1890: 



Crowns. 

Notes of tho Riks Bank 45, 398, 621 

Notes of private banks 58, 596, 794 



Total. 



103,995,415 



(10) No laws were passed during the year 1890 affecting the coinage. ; s 
tender character of the metallic or paper circulation. 

(11) The report of the operations of the mint is not published. 

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250 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



RUSSIA. 

Legation of the United States, 

St. Petersburg, January 28, 1891. 

Sir: Through the courtesy of the imperial minister of finance, I am able to com- 
ply with the request contained in your letter of October 31, 1890, and inclose here- 
with the translation of a note received from the director of the mint at St. Peters- 
burg showing the production of gold in Russia for the calendar year 1890. 

The more complete information in reply to the interrogatories contained in the 
circular instructions of the State Department of December 10, 1890, will be fhmished 
later. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Chas. Emory Smith. 

The Director of the Mint, 

Washington , D. C. 



The director of the St. Petersburg mint expressing his respects to his excellency 
the envoy of the United States of North America, has the honor to inform him by 
the command of his excellency the minister of finance that the quantity of pure 
gold furnished in the course of the calendar year 1890 at the St. Petersburg mint 
from the mines and works of the Russian Empire amounts to 1,983 poods 34 pounds 
15 zolotniks 9 dolyas, or 31,841,257.32 grammes (1,023,696.423 fine ounces, value 
$21,161,683.16). 

January 14 [26], 1891. 



Legation of the United States, 

St. Petersburg, May 19, 1891. 

Sir: Referring to the note to you of January 28, last, from this legation, I have 
the honor to inclose to you herewith the complete information requested in your 
behalf in the circular instruction of the Department of State dated December 10, 1890. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

George W. Wurtz, 

[ ChargS d’affaires ad interim. 

The Director of the Mint, 

Washington, D. C. 



Answer 8 to intei'rogatoi'ies, 1890. 



(1) During the calendar year 1890 the amount of gold coined at the mint of St. 
Petersburg, of the standard of .900, was : 



Roubles. 

Imperials (10 roubles) 160, 060 

Half imperials ( 5 roubles) 28, 000, 030 



(2) Of silver: 

(a) Of the standard of .900 : Roubles. 

Pieces of 1 rouble 90, 256 

Pieces of 50 kopeks » , . 1, 003 

Pieces of 25 kopeks 501.50 

(b) Of the standard of .500 : 

Pieces of 20 kopeks 700, 001. 20 

Pieces of 15 kopeks 525, 000. 90 

Pieces of 10 kopeks 375, 000. 60 

Pieces of 5 kopeks 400, 000. 30 



Of the above fractional coinage 562,000 roubles were made horn Polish silver 
money withdrawn from circulation. 

Poods. Foonts.* 



(3) Importation of gold coin 1, 184 39 

Importation of gold ingots 58 23 

Exportation of gold com 1, 337 32 

(4) Importation of silver coin 1, 822 25 

Importation of silver ingots 8, 814 26 

Exportation of silver coin 3, 629 06 

Exportation of silver ingots 2, 441 33 



* 40 foonts equal 1 pood ; 1 foont equals 0.902817895 avoirdupois pound. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



251 



(5) During the year 1890 there was received at the mint (whither all gold and sil- 
ver must be Drought) from Russian mines pure gold to the amount of 31,841,257.32 
grammes, of the value of 27,417,443 roubles 87 kopeks. 

(6) During the same period pure silver was received to the amount of 13,665,836.81 
grammes, of the value of 759,376 roubles 38 kopeks. 

(7 and 8) On the 1st of January, 1891, the hank of the state held gold and silver 
money to the nominal value of 445,968,176 roubles 29 kopeks; as for the amount of 
gold and silver in general circulation, there is no precise information. 

(9) On the 1st of January, 1891, the amount of government notes outstanding was, 
in all, 1,046,295,384 roubles. Bank notes are no longer in circulation. 

(10) In 1890 the State definitively ceased to receive Polish silver money. (The 
extract of this law is herewith inclosed.) 

(11) The report of the operations of the mint is not made public. 

Translation of the impet'ial ukase relating to the suspension of the circulation of certain 

silver coins of Poland . 

Ukase, signed by the sovereign, to the senate directing, concerning the suspension 

of the circulation of the Polish money called “dissentki” (5 kopeks) and 

“pentki” (2| kopeks). 

. Finding it indispensable to suspend definitively the circulation of the Polish money 
called “dissentki” and “pentki”’ and in order to facilitate the return to the state 
of this money by the population, we order : 

(1) Henceforth until April 30, 1889, the acceptance without obstacle of Polish 
money at its nominal value at all the treasuries of the provinces of Warsaw, Kalick, 
Kelitzk, Lonijinsk, Lubinsk, Petrokowsk, Plotzk, Radomsk, Sedletzk, and Sou- 
valsk, in exchange for Russian fractional money and for copper, as also for pay- 
ments. 

(2) From May, 1889, until January 1, 1891, the acceptance of the same for pay- 
ments amd for exchange, with the diminution of its nominal value, until November 
1, 1889, a diminution (reduction) of 10 per cent; from November 1, 1889, to May 1, 
1890, of 25 per cent, and from May 1, 1890, to January 1, 1891, of 60 per cent. 

(3) From the 1st of January, 1891, to suspend entirely the acceptance of this 
money at the treasuries, as also its circulation among private persons. 

The senate directing will not fail to take the necessary steps for the execution of 
this ukase. 

The original is signed by His Majesty. 

St. Petersburg, July 8, 1888. 



Coinage since 1880. 

According to the Economiste Russe the amount of coins stamped in Russia since 
1880 was as follows : 



Years. 


Nominal values. 


Total. 


Gold coins 
of the fine- 
ness of |g. 


Silver coins — 


Bronze coins. 


Of the fine- 

- 83.3 

ness of — 


Of the fine- 
ness of |g. 


1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885. 

1886 £ 

1887 

1888 

1889..-. 

1890 


Roubles. 
31, 300. 056 
27, 145, 051 
19, 835, 048 
30. 407, 056 
23, 126, 038 
1 26, 802, 088 

1 16, 800, 000 

! *2, 326, 350 

! *26, 055, 035 
*26, 510, 095 
*24, 430, 030 
*28, 150, 090 


Roubles. 
560, 014 
700,019 
435, 012 
704,858 
356,009 
500, 017 


Roubles. 

6, 955, 254 
2, 908, 006 
1, 107, 514 
1, 673, 004 
1,289,003 
750,005 


Roubles. 

1,185,501 

1,010,301 

332,200 

523.000 
110,900 

100.000 


Roubles. 

40, 000,825 
31,762,377 
21,709,774 
33, 307,918 
24,861,950 
28,152,110 


*489, 635 
*510, 507 
*500,022 
*1, 753 
*91, 760 


tl, 101, 153 
tl, 500,002 
tl, 007, 012 
tl, 493, 001 
t2, 000, 008 


100,000 

100,000 

100,000 

170,000 

130,003 


20,817.138 
28,165,544 
28, 117, 129 
26,094,784 
30,371,856 



* Of the fineness of .900. 



1 0f the fineness of .500. 



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252 ' REPORT or THE DIRECTOR OP THE MINT. . 

The manufactures for the year 1890 consisted of gold and silver, as follows: 



Gold coins : 

Imperials (10 roubles) 

Half imperials (5 roubles) 
Silver coins : 

Pieces of 1 rouble 

Pieces of 50 copeeks 

Pieces of 25 copecks 

Pieces of 20 copecks 

Pieces of 15 copeeks 

Pieces of 10 copecks 

Pieces of 5 copecks 



Metals. 



Number of 
pieces. 


Nominal 

value. 


Roubles. 


Roubles. 


15, 006 


150, 060. 00 


5, 600, 006 


28, 000, 030. 00 


90,256 


90, 256. 00 


2,006 1 


1,003.00 


2,006 


501.50 


3, 500,006 


700, 001. 20 


3, 500, 006 


525, 000. 90 


3, 750. 006 


375, 000. 60 


8, 000,006 


400, 000. 30 



The bullion stamped in 1890 includes 2,537,506 2-copeck pieces; 6,905,006 1-copeck 
pieces; 2,040,006 ^-copeck pieces, and 1,006 ^-copeck pieces. 

(Bulletin de Statistique, March, 1891, p. 366.) 



JAPAN. 



Department for Foreign Affairs, 

Tolcio , the 14th day, the 3d month, the 24th year of Meiji. 

Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a note addressed by the 
late minister of the United States, his excellency John F. Swift, under date of the 
13th of January last, requesting me to furnish him with certain information rela- 
tive to the coinage, etc., of this Empire, which information he desired to obtain 
under instructions from the honorable the Secretary of State, and for the use of the 
honorable Secretary of the Treasury of the United States. 

Having referred the matter to the minister of finance, I am now in receipt of a 
copy of report of the director of the imperial mint for the year ending 31st March, 
1890, together with copies of the laws, ordinances, and notifications, and answers, 
to the queries submitted respecting coinage, etc., which I beg to inclose herewith. 

Viscount Siuzo Aoki, 

Minister for Foreign Affairs. 

Edwin Dun, Esq., 

Charge d’ Affaires ad interim of the United States of America . 



Legation of the United States, 

Tolcio , March 30, 1891. 

Sir : Referring to your circular instruction dated December 10, 1890, requiring, at 
the instance of the Secretary of the Treasury, certain information relative to the 
coinage, etc., of Japan, I have now the honor to inclose herewith a copy of a note 
from Viscount Aoki, His Imperial Japanese Majesty’s minister for foreign affairs, 
dated March 14, 1891, together with copies of the documents accompanying it, to 
wit: Copy of the report of the director of the imperial Japanese mint for the year 
ended March 31, 1890; copies of laws, ordinances, notifications, relative to the 
coinage, etc., of Japan, and answers to the interrogatories contained in your circu- 
lar instruction. 

I have the honor to be, etc., 

Edwin Dun. 

The Secretary of State, 

Washington , D.C. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



253 



Answers to interrogatories , 1890. 

(1) Gold coinage : 

5-yen pieces yen . . 1, 194, 050. 00 

Beminted of the above Nil. 

(2) Silver coinage : 

1-yen pieces yen . . 7, 296, 645. 00 

Beceived for recoinage, J apauese ounces . . 298. 57 

Beceived for recoinage, foreign do 571.83 

(3) Exports of gold coin and bullion : 

Japanese coin yen . . 1, 662, 671. 90 

Japanese old coin do 4, 394. 75 

Foreign coin - do 15, 541. 77 

Foreign bullion Nil. 

Imports of gold coin and bullion : 

Foreign gold coin yen. . 623. 70 

Bullion ounces.. 15,811.48 

No export or import of gold ore. 

(4) Export of silver coin and bullion : 

Japanese coin - - yen . . 11, 686, 609. 90 

Japanese old coin do 137, 424. 43 

Foreign silver coin do 255, 778. 36 

Bullion ounces . . 8, 813. 52 

Import of silver coin and bullion : 

Foreign coin yen . . 383, 079. 00 

Bullion ounces . . 308, 018. 83 

No export or import of silver ore. 

(5 and 6) Gold and silver production : 



Mines. 


Weight. 


Value. 


Imperial household mines : 

Gold 


Kilogram ft. 
26, 756 
708, 594 


Yen. 
202, 471 
291, 971 


Silver 





Returns for private mines for 1890 not received. 

(7 and 8) Stock of gold and silver coin in the country at the end of 1890: 

Yen. 

Gold coin 16,271,829 

Old gdld coin 72, 196, 353 

Total 88, 468, 182 



Silver coin 39.554,419 

Old silver coin 20,651,097 



Total 

The quantity of bullion in the country is not known. 

(9) Government paper currency outstanding: 

National bank paper outstanding | * 

Bank of Japan convertible silver notes 

(10) See separate report of laws herewith. 



60, 205, 516 



Yen. 

33, 272, 714 
25, 810, 720 
75, 709, 157 



(11) The total coinage of gold and silver during the financial year 1890 is given in 
the following table : 



Gold 5-yen . 
Silver 1-yeu 

Total 



Denomination. 




Number. 


Value. 


i 

352. 842 


Yen. 

1, 764. 210. 00 
| 7, 294. 735. 00 






7. 241,735 j 












7, 6!7, 577 


1 9, 058, 945. 00 

1 






1 



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V 



254 EEPOET OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



The amount of coins struck at the mint from its commencement up to the end of 
this financial year is as follows : 





Gold. 


Weight. 


Number. 


Value. 


20-yen w. 

10-yen 

5-ymi 


Troy ounce*. 

50,612.00 
1,001, 607.58 
2,039,429.44 
94,736.92 
109, 139. 58 


47, 225 
1, 869, 178 
7,612, 302 
883, 558 
2, 036, 636 


Ten. 

944, 500. 00 

18. 691. 780. 00 

38.061.510.00 
1, 767, 116. 00 
2, 036, 656. 00 


2-yen 


1-yflTi 


Total... 


3, 295,52452 


12, 448, 919 


61,501,562. Ooj 





| Silver. 




Weight. 


Number. 


Value. 


1-yen 

Trade dollar 
50-sen 


Troy ounce a. 
59, 964, 137. 66 
2, 674, 780. 58 
3, 544, 826. 56 
7, 026, 191. 71 
7, 847, 318. 12 
2, 175, 516. 15 


69, 184, 764 
3, 056, 638 
8,593,446 
40, 996, 365 
91, 016, 081 
50, 534, 204 


Ten. 

69,184,764.00 
3, 056, 638. OO 
4, 296, 723. OO 
8, 199, 273. OO 
9, 101, 608. 10 
2, 526, 710. 20 


20-sen 


10-sen 

5-sen 




Total . . . 


83, 232, 770. 78 263, 381, 4»8'96, 365, 716. 30 



i 



Coins Issued from the Foundation of the Mint to 1889 -' 90 . 



Fiscal years. 



From the eleventh month of 1870 to the sixth 
month of 1875 

1875- ’76 

1876- ’77 

1877- *78 

1878- ’79 

1879- ’80 

1880- ’81 

1881-’82 

1882- ’83 

1883- ’84 

1884- ’85 

1885- ’86 (nine months) 

1886- ’87 

1887- ’88 

1888- 89 

1889- ’90 

Total 

Coins remelted from 1878-79 to 1889- 90 

Amount of coins put in circulation — 



Gold coins 


Silver coins. 


Copper and 
nickel coins. 


Total. 


Ten . 


Ten. 


Ten. 


Ten. 


50, 248,822 


15, 047, 245 


967, 413 


66,263,480 


365,558 


1 -95, 482 


917,405 


3,178,445 


1, 057, 354 


5, f>15, 658 


1, 127, 045 


7,700,067 


361,435 


iO, 889 


937,565 


5,239,889 


468,050 


2 J 59, 710 


919, 051 


3, 646,811 


472, 874 


! 143,999 


885, 541 


4,802, 414 


481,348 


5 "25,153 


1, 120,475 


6, 626, 976 


804 u 297 


3, 397, 913 


1, 092, 157 


5, 294,367 


410, 583 


4,393, 079 


1,201,533 


6,005, 195 


504,560 


3, 035,245 


1,071, 163 


5,210,968 


816,768 


5, *64, 672 


766,464 


7,447,904 


617,041 


4, 016, 133 


265, 120 


4,898,294 


1, 215, 372 


0,045,744 


412,356 


11, 573,472 


977, 718 


10,229,983 


234,763 


11,442,464 


857, 196 


10, :;53, 377 


500,000 


11,710,573 


1, 758, 820 


7,290,449 


2, 100,434 


11, 149, 703 


61,417,796 


96, 254, 731 


14, 518, 485 


172,191,012 


3,263 


3, 798, 869 


128, 501 


3, 930, 633 


61, 414, 533 


92, 455, 862 


14,389,984 


168, 260, 379 



(From the Bulletin de Statisti^ue, July, 1891, p. 104.) 



CHINA. 

Legation of the United States, 

Peking , October 21, 1890. 

Sir*. It may perhaps interest you to know that the negotiations between China 
and various syndicates of capitalists, who have been endeavoring for some months to 
make a loan to China of 30,000,000 taels, have been suspended. 

The uncertainty as to the future price of silver was one of the causes that produced 
this result. Another, and perhaps the most important, was the disinclination of the 
Imperial Government to issue an imperial decree sanctioning this loan. The for- 
eigners interested insisted that this loan should be made to the Imperial Government 
directly and be approved by the Emperor in a decree issued by him. The Chinese 
desired that the business should be done with the officials of the imperial household, 
who have usually borrowed money in their own names. It was given out that this 
loan was to be made for the purpose of building a railroad into Manchuria. The 
Chinese are generally averse to contracting obligations in foreign countries. So much 
is this the case, that it was lately widely rumored in Peking that Prince Kung was 
ottered a position in the government service owing to the sickness of Prince Chun, 
and that the prince declined the otter except on condition that no foreign loan should 
be made and no railway built. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



255 



While the credit of China in the financial centers of the world is undoubtedly good, 
still there is great internal distress for money. The late floods were the most disas- 
trous ever known. Hundreds of thousands of houses were destroyed, and millions of 
people are left homeless and starving. It is a fixed Chinese idea that when disaster 
comes the government must supply the remedy. Relief also must come in voluntary 
payments, and not in compensation for labor performed. Thus the millions of taels 
that China and the foreigners give every year to relieve the poor do not produce any 
but temporary results. China to-day has to face famine, floods, poverty, rebellions 
here ana there, dissatisfied soldiers, and a discontented people. At no time since I 
have been in China have there been more demands on the imperial treasury, and never 
has the government been so hardly pushed for money. 

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, 

Charles Denby. 

The Secretary of State, 

Washington , D. C. 



Legation of the United States, 

Peking , February 6 , 1891. 

Sir: In reply to the circular of the Department of State of December 10, 1890, 
with reference to coinage, production, import and export of the precious metals, etc., 
I have the honor to inclose herewith replies to the questions therein proposed. 

I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

Charles Denby. 

The Director of the Mint, 

Washington , D. C . 



Answer to interrogatories , 1890k 

(1) No gold has been coined or recoined in 1890. 

(2) There are no statistics available as to the amount of silver coined in 1890. In 
1889 a mint for the coinage of silver was established at Canton by the Viceroy Chang 
Chit-tuug. In the summer of 1890 the work of coinage was commenced there. The 
coins issued are of the denomination of dollars, half dollars, 50, 20, 10, and 5 cent 
pieces. Their value in taels is as follows: Dollar = 0.72, half-dollar = 0.36, 20-cent 
piece =0.146, 10-cent piece =0.073, 5-cent piece = 0.0363. 

As to the recoinage of domestic and foreign coins little definite information can be 
given. Many thousand Mexican dollars are annually melted into pure silver for 
use in the interior where foreign coins are unrecognized. The system of stamping 
foreign coins with the long name of the various native firms through whose hands 
they pass soon reduces them to unrecognizable pieces of silver which are gathered 
together and melted into silver shoes. The number of dollars thus annually with- 
drawn from circulation is immense, but unascertainable. 

(3 and 4) No statistics have been kept of the import and export of gold or silver 
during the calendar year 1890. 

(5 and 6) The weight of gold and silver produced from the mines in 1890 and their 
value are not asceitainable. 

(7 and 8) The stock of gold and silver coin and bullion in the country at the close 
of the calendar year 1890 is not ascertainable. 

(9) No government notes weTe issued during 1890. There are many banks in China 
which issue notes, but no statistics are kept of their issues. 

(10) No decrees were issued during the year 1890 affecting the coinage or legal 
character of the metallic and paper circulation. In August, 1890, however, the Tao- 
tai of Tientsin and Hokien Fu and the Customs Taotai at Tientsin issued a proclama- 
tion stating that the Canton coins are a legal tender in all parts of China. The basis 
of this action of the Taotais was an order of Viceroy Li, governor-general of Chihli. 
The proclamation is local, but its contents show that the new coinage has imperial 
sanction. 

(U) There is no report of the operations of the mint. 

Charles Denby. 



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256 



REPORT OF TIIE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



MEXICO. 



Legation of the United States, 

Mexico , September 2S, 1890 . 

Sir: Referring to Department's circular of December 18, 1889, relative to the coin- 
age of Mexico and other kiudred data for the calendar year 1889, I have the honor, 
in connection with inclosed correspondence, to inform the Department that during 1 
the said period of 1889 the total coinage in the mints of Mexico was $25,809,029.10, 
in the following proportion: 



Gold $314, 607. 00 

Silver .* 25,294,726.85 

Copper 199, 695. 25 



During the same period the exports of precious metals from Mexico aggregated 
$41,187,798.64, in the following proportions: 



Gold $528,843.13 

Silver v 40,658,955.51 



During the same period the silver entered at the mints of the Republic for recoin- 
age was valued at $702,844.72; of which $535,097.04 was recoined. 

I have this day mailed to the Director of the United States Mint at Washington, 
D. C., a set of the printed reports furnished by Mr. M. Fernandez-Leal, assistant 
secretary of public works, of Mexico, who informed Mr. Butler that at an early date 
the balance of the information sought under the Department circular above alluded 
to would be forwarded to this legation by him. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, etc. 

Tiios. R. Ryan. 

The Secretary of State, 

Washington , D. C. 



Mr. Leech to Mr. Ryan. 

[Telegram.] 

Washington, D. C., September 18 , 1890. 

The information requested in circular of Department of State of December 18, 1889, 
regarding Mexico has not been received except as relates to the product of the mines. 
Please explain and forward it, especially the coinage for the calendar year, in time 
for my fiscal report. 

E. O. Leech, 
Director of the Mint . 

Hon. Thos. Ryan, 

United States Minister , Mexico. 



Mr. Ryan to Mr. Leal. 



[Personal.] 



United States Legation, 

Mexico , September 19, 1890. 

My Dear Mr. Leal: Mr. E. C. Butler, of this legation, Avill submit to you a set 
of questions relating to coinage, etc., of Mexico for the calendar year 1889, and I 
would be very grateful if you would, at your earliest convenience, furnish me re- 
plies thereto. 

The information is sought for the use of the Director of the United States Mint at 
Washington, from whom I have just received a telegram asking for it in time for his 
fiscal report. 

Mr. Leech is, however, particularly anxipus to ascertain at once the amount of 
coinage (gold, silver, and copper separately) of Mexico for the calendar year 1889, 
and it would greatly oblige mo if you could advise me thereof, so I can telegraph 
him without delay. 

Trusting you will graciously hasten the information desired, in view of its great 
value and importance to the United States Treasury Department, 

I remain, etc., 



Thos. Ryan. 



Hon. Manuel Fernandez Leal, etc., 

Mexico . 



Digitized by U.ooQle 




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



' 257 



Mexico, February 87, 1391. 

My Very Dear Sir : I received the telegram you were pleased to send me, ask- 
ing me for data on the production of the mines of Mexico during last year. It was 
answered by cable, informing you of the sending of these data, and annexed to this 
letter you will receive a table showing the quantity and value of the precious metals 
exported from the Republic during the jrear 1890, as well as the deposits of gold and 
silver made at the mints for coinage during the same year. 

L As to the gold and silyer employed in the arts during 1890, there are no data to 
enable one to estimate their amount, and the same is the case with regard to the 
quantities and values of these two metals which have been deposited during the 
same period in the banks and safes of mining exchanges, because these limit their 
remittances to mints to the sums necessary to meet the payment of salaries and 
wages and of other expenditures, preferring, in the majority of cases, to keep their 
stocks or values in the form of bars. 

Besides, the temptation to avoid the payment of coinage charges, 4.41 per cent 
and 4.618 per cent for silver and gold respectively, which have to be paid when these 
metals are exported in the shape of bullion, as well as the facility with which their 
exportation to foreign countries may be concealed, raises a presumption that there 
are clandestine exportations to a large amount, notwithstanding the constant vigi- 
lance employed to prevent them, and which it is difficult to exercise over such vast 
lengths as those of the lines of the frontiers and coasts of Mexico. 

The consideration alone of the constant development of the working of mines of 
gold and silver during recent years, apparent enough in several States of the Repub- 
lic, and of the small increase perceptible in the exports and coinages of those metals, 
inclines me to suppose that the official data which I send you show only a part of 
Mexico’s total production of gold and silver, the amount of which, for the reasons 
stated, it is not possible to make an estimate of, there being no bais for one. 

I hope, however, that the data sent herewith will be of some use to you. 

Your devoted servant, 

Javier Stavoli. 



The Director of the Mint, 

Washington, D. C. 



Weight and Value of the Precious Metals Exported from Mexico during 

the Year 1890. 



Description. 


Weight. 


Value. 




Kilograms . 
783.984 


$629, 515. 96 


Silver ore 


187, 036. 153 
160, 800. 326 
23,157. 315 
11, 596. 445 
59.440 


7,652,584.22 
6, 579, 145. 36 
947, 481. 58 
474, 468. 58 
2, 432. 00 


Rilvftr 1 >n 11 {nn : .... 


gtlvfip sulpliurets 


Mi ved silver (silver with gold) 


Silver for fluxing 


Total 


382, 649.679 


15, 656, 1U. 74 





Deposits of Gold and Silver at the Mints of the Republic to be Coined . 

DURING THE YEAR 1890. 



Description. 


Weight. 


Value. 




Kilograms. 
617,347.813 
350. 974 


$25, 258,785.77 
237, 053.67 


Gold 




617,347.813 
382, 649. 679 


25,258, 785.77 
15, 656,111.74 


Silver exported in the varinns forms mentioned 


Total 


999, 997.492 


40,914,897.61 


Gold deposited to be coined 


350.974 

783.984 


237, 053.67 
529, 515.96 


Gold exported, as above mentioned 


Total 


1,134.958 


766,569.63 





Note. — The values of the exportations for the months of October, November, and 
December, of the custom-houses of La Paz and Palominas, are not included in the 
above, as their amounts have not yet been received. 

10285 M 17 Digitized by VjOOg 1C 




258 REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 01 THE MINT. 

Coinages in the Republic op Mexico from the Foundation of nra Mint m 
tiie Colonial Period to June 30, 1890. 



Epoch. 



Gold. 



Silver. 



Copper. 



Colonial epoch : 

Macuquina, from- 1587 to 1731 

Columnar! a, from 1732 to 1771 

Bus to, from 1772 to 1821 

Total 

Epoch of independence : 

Imperial bast of Ttnrbide, 1822 and 1823 

Eagle coin of the Republic, from 1824 to J une 30, 1880 . 

Total 

Eagle coin of the Republic, from July 1, 1880, to June 
30, 1890 

ResiimO : 

Colonial epoch 

Epoch of independence 

Last ten years 

Total coinage... 



$8,497,950 
19, 889, 014 
40, 391, 447 



$ 752 , 067 , 456.54 
441,629,211.45 
888, 563,989.45 



68, 778, 411 



2, 082, 260, 657. 44 



557, 392 18, 575, 569. 69 

50, 147, 172 887, 614, 414. 09 



50,704,564 | 906,189,983.78 



3, 765, 431 



255,124,045.75 



68,778,411 
50, 704, 564 
3, 765, 431 



123,248,406 



2,082,260,657.41 
906, 189,983.78 
255, 124,045.75 



3,243, 574,686.97 



Epoch. 



Niokel. 



Totals. 



$ 200 , 000.60 



342, 893.37 



542, 893. 37 



5,384,244.64 



5, 384, 244. 64 



603, 503. 63 



542,893.37 
5, 384, 244. 64 
603, 503. 63 



6,530,641.64 



Average in 
one year. 



Colonial epoch : 

Macuquina, from 1537 to 1731. 
Colunmaria, from 1732 to 1771 
Busto, from 1772 to 1821 



$760, 765, 406. 54 
461,518, 225. 45 
929, 298, 329. 82 



Total 



2, 151, 581, 961. 81 



$7, 549, 410. 39 



imperial bust, of Iturbide, 1822 and 1823 

Eagle coin of the Republic, from 1824 to June 30, 1880. 

Total 



19,132, 961.69 
943, 145,830.73 



962,278,792.42 ! 16,309,810.04 



•Eagle coin of the Republic, from July 1, 1880, to June 
30, 1890 



$4, 000, 000 



263,492,980.98 



26, 349, 298. 09 



Resum6 : 



Colonial epoch 

Epoch of independence. 
Last ten years 



4,000,000 



2,151,581, 961.81 
962, 278, 792. 42 
263, 492, 980. 98 



Total coinage 



4,000,000 



3,377,353,735.21 



Value of Gold Coinages in the Republic during the period from July 1, 
1880, to June 30, 1890, with the names of Mints in which they were 
Effected. 



Fiscal years. 


Alamos. 


Culiacan. 


Chihuahna. 


Durango. 


Guadalajara. 


Guanajuato. 


1880 ’81 


$23,240 
31, 720 
35,600 
38, 590 
42, 510 
52,190 
42, 000 
48, 230 
49, 370 
45, 580 


$47, 238 
32, 080 
57, 860 
27, 038 
68, 360 
41,940 
38, 177 
23,638 
20, 418 
33,555 




$30,250 
21, 520 
14,950 
4,040 


$4,040 

2,390 


$136, 180 
113,300 
61,500 
43,300 
55,360 
36,200 
21,700 
22,890 
21,880 
13,436 


1881 ’82 


$8,740 
29,640 
8, 880 
3, 480 


1882 ‘83 


1883- '84 




1884-’85 




1885-’86 






1886-.87 


5, 980 
10,040 
4,454 
13, 380 






1887-'88 






1888-’89 






1889-’90 






Total 










84,594 




6,430 


525,746 





Digitized by C.ooQLe 












REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 259 

Value op Gold Coinages in the Republic during the period prom July 1, 
1880 to June 30, etc.— Continued. 



Fiscal years. 


Hermosillo. 


Mexico. • 


Oaxaca. 


San Lnia 
Potosi. 


Zacatecas. 


Total. 


1880-’81 


$7,480 


$220, 000 

223.000 

200.000 
183,000 
225, 500 
203, 5'X) 
245, 200 
185,240 
152, 150 
109,690 






$17,790 
14, 770 
6, 350 
21, 930 
21,900 
31,960 
43,290 
23, 380 
86, 700 
27,657 


$492,068 
452,500 
407,600 
328,698 
423,250 
367,490 
398, 647 
316,818 
334,972 
243,298 


1885— ’82 - 




1882-’83 






1883-’84 






1884-’85 






1885-’86 






1886-’87 






1887 ’88 






1888-’89 






1889-’90 








Total 








7,480 


| 1, 947, 280 


28, 080 




295,727 J 


3,765,431 







Coinage in the Mints op the Republic during Fiscal Year li^d-W. 



Mints. 


Silver pieces. 


1-dollar. 


50-cent. 


25-cent. 


10-cent. 


5-oent. 


Value. 




424, 700 
1,004, 108 
2, 538, 017 
1,017, 221 
1,644, 578 

3. 455. 000 
484, 095 

7. 216.000 
117,600 

1, 832, 140 

4.003.000 




30,800 
27,284 
25,092 
50, 791 
30, 400 

313. 000 
18,000 

168.000 


20,000 

46,800 

155,060 

31,510 

265,092 

115.000 
26,500 

672.000 
26,000 

127.000 

240.000 


18,000 

63.620 

77.620 


$435,300.00 

1.018.790.00 

2. 563. 677. 00 
1, 033,069.75 
1,688,004. 70 

3. 545. 750.00 
495, 900. 00 

7 Rftft 200 on 


















186, 350 
20,000 
93, 100 
1 222 non 


















14, 000 120, 900. 00 

173,200 1,881,335.00 

560, 000 | 4, 159, 300. 00 






111, 340 
417,200 






Total 




23, 736, 459 




1, 191, 907 


1,724,962 


2,427,890 j 24,328,326.45 






Mints. 


Gold pieces. 


20-dollar. 


10-dollar. 


5-dollar. 


24 -dollar. 


ldollar. 


Value. 


a lamps 




4,558 

1,038 










CJnliar-flU , ..... 


1,050 

669 




435 






Ohihnfthnft 






Doran go ...... 










Guadalajara 














Guanjyjuftto 


576 








1,916 


13,436.00 


Hermosillo 








Mexico ...... .......... 


5, 347 


225 






500 


109,690.00 


OftTAAft __ 
























2,484 


373 


184 


492 




Total 




7,642 j 8,305 


808 j 184 


2,908 


243,298.00 





Mints. 


Copper pieoes. 


Total value. 


lcent. 


Value. 








$488, 800. 00 

1. 052. 345. 00 

2. 577. 057. 00 
1, 033, 069. 75 
1, 688, 004.'70 

3. 559. 186. 00 

495. 900.00 
7, 630, 622. 47 

120. 900. 00 

1.861.335.00 

4. 186.957.00 




















Gnadftmjs ,, H - .... 






Guanajuato 






IT Arm nail! o ........................... 






Mexico -t - * ....... 


13, 463, 247 


$134, 632. 47 


Oaxaca. 


San Luis Potosi -- - 






Zacatecas v 






Total 






18, 463, 247 


134, 632. 47 


24,706,256.92 





Digitized by Google 













260 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Value of Silver Coinages in the Republic during the period from July 
1 , 1880 , to June 30 , 1890 , with the names of Mints in which they were 
Effected. 



Fiscal years. 


Alamos. 


Culiaoan. 


Chihuahua. 


Durango. 


Guadalajara. 


Guanajuato. 


188Q-’81 

1881-’82 

1882- ’83 

1883- ’84 

1884- ’85 

1885- ’86 

1886- ’87 

1887- ’88 

1888- ’89 

1889- ’90 

Totals 


$905,663.20 
1, 064, 431. 90 
955, 285. 45 
! 1,292,940.00 
1, 023, 850.00 
774,281.15 
804, 250. 35 

579. 650.00 

441. 100. 00 
435, 300. 00 


$1, 219, 082. 50 

926. 713. 00 

744. 283. 00 

574. 944. 00 
641, 721. 00 

555. 185. 00 

708.730.00 

763. 994. 00 
946, 502, 00 

1,018, 790. 00 


$1, 178, 534. 00 

1.345.727.00 
1, 605, 561. 50 

1. 927. 556. 00 
2, 017, 195. 50 
2, 519, 712. 50 

2. 647. 182. 00 

2. 642. 186. 00 
2,454, 551.00 

2. 563. 677. 00 


$977,964.00 

1.004.842.00 
874, 828.00 

1. 090. 305. 00 
1, 164, 822. 20 

1. 032. 175. 75 
983, 330. 60 

1, 038, 687. 50 
981,128.40 

1.033. 060. 75 


$1,363,241.30 
1,324,394.10 
1, 111, 514.00 
1, 130,003.85 
871, 199.00 
986, 460. 30 
994,113.05 
1, 008, 695.00 
1,354,431.20 
1,688,004.70 


$4,135,250.00 

4.291.000. 00 

4.224.000. 00 

4.385.000. 00 

4.974.500.00 
4,578, 000.00 

4.108.000. 00 

4.582.000. 00 

3.962.500.00 

3.545.750.00 


8, 276,752.05 


| 8,099,944.50 20, 901, 882. 50 10,181,153.20 | 


|11, 832, 056. 50 | 42,736,000.00 


Fiscal years. 


Hermosillo. 


Mexico. 


Oaxaca. 


S.LuisPotosi. 


Zacatecas. 


Total 


1880-’81 

1881-82 

1882- ’83 

1883- ’84 

1884- ’85 

1885- ’86 

1886- ’87 i 

1887- ’88 

1888^89 

1889-’90 

Total 


$711, 250. 00 
492, 992. 00 

449. 460. 00 

539. 400. 00 
280, 000. 00 

257. 610. 00 

195. 300.00 

178. 300. 00 

593. 660.00 

495. 900. 00 


$5, 691, 000. 00 
6, 216, 000. 00 

5, 635, 000. 00 
6, 088, 000. 00 

6, 452, 000. 00 

7, 567, 000. 00 
7, 895, 200. 00 
7, 128, 000. 00 
7, 708, 000. 00 
7, 386, 300. 00 


$142,660.00 

121. 945. 00 
97, 950. 00 

129. 200. 00 
152. 700. 00 

143. 100. 00 
121, 200. 00 

111.400.00 

184.550.00 

120.900.00 


$2, 315, 750. 00 
2, 345, 215, 00 
3, 182, 040. 00 

3. 227. 030. 00 

3. 330. 740. 00 
3, 484, 280. 00 

3. 181. 725. 00 
2. 744, 065. 00 
2, 380, 800. 00 
1,881, 335.00 


$5, 977,000.00 

6. 013. 000. 00 

5. 204. 000. 00 

4.993.000. 00 

4.932.000. 00 1 

5.094.000. 00 

5.205.000. 00 

5. 136. 000. 00 

5.024.000. 00 
4, 158, 300. 00 


$24,617,395.00 
25, 146, 260. 00 
24 083,921.96 
25, 377,378.85 

25. 840.727.70 

26.991.804.70 
26,844,031.00 
25, 862, 977. 50 
26, 031, 222.60 
24, 328,326.45 


4,193,872.00 67, 766, 500. 00 

i 


1,325,605.00 


28, 072, 980. 00 


51,737, 300.00 


255,124,045.75 



Summary of the Coinage of the Mints of the Republic in the Months of 
the Fiscal Year of 1889 -’ 90 . 



Silver pieces. 



Months. 



Value. 



1-dollar. 



50-cent. 



25-oent. 



10-cent. 



5-cent. 



July 

August. . . . 
September 
Oet< ber . - . 
November 
December. 



2, 266, 566 
2, 128. 939 
1, 848, 343 
1,986, 529 
1,953, 446 
2, 031, 495 



50, 400 
201,882 
93,000 
48, 200 
132, 000 
66,572 



190,900 
145, 860 
118, 400 
125, 150 
264,910 
130,092 



144, 880 
350,000 
239,100 
79, 740 
56,000 
282,350 



$2,305, 500.00 
2, 211. 495. 50 

1.895.388.00 

2. 016.081.00 
2, 015, 767.00 
2,075,261.70 



1890. 



January . 
February 
March . . . 



April 

May. 

June. 



1, 816, 660 
1, 756, 066 
2, 032, 841 
1. 864, 426 
2, 041, 024 
2, 010, 125 



146, 137 
53, 332 
68,400 
82,000 
110, 772 
139, 212 



83,800 

141. 000 
186,500 

163.000 
107, 350 

68,000 



183,620 

312. 000 

94.000 

56. 000 
361,600 

268.000 



1,870,755.25 

1.799.098.00 

2.073. 291.00 

1.904.026.00 

2.097.532.00 

2.065. 128.00 



Total 



23,736,459 



1, 191, 907 



1,724,962 



2,427,190 



24,328,323.45 



Digitized by AiOOQle 












REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF -THE MINT. 261 

Summary of the /Coinage of the Mints of the Republic in the Months of 
the Fiscal Year of 1889-'90— Continued. 



Months. 


Gold pieces. 


Value. 


■B 


10-dollar. 






1-dollar. 


1889. 

July 


1,050 

422 

1,269 


480 
1, 312 
834 
1, 362 
88 








$25, 800.00 
21, 560.00 

33.720.00 

13.620.00 
3,820.00 

50.617.00 

26. 060.00 
15,240.00 




, 






September 








October 








November 


147 
2, 365 

1,050 








December 


373 


184 


992 


1890. 

Jan nary 


506 

1,524- 


February 








March 


* 








April 


1,000 

134 

205 


1,405 


435 






36,225.00 
4,596.00 
1 12,040.00 


May 




1, 916 


June 


794 






Total 








7,642 


8, 305 


.808 


184 


2,908 


243,298.00 





Months. 


1 , — — 

Copper pieces. 


Total value. 


1-cent. 


Value. 


1889. 


2, 010, 000 
2, 500, 000 
2, 750, 000 
1, 209, 525 


$20, 100.00 
25,000. 00 
27, 500. 00 
12,095.25 


$2,351, 400. 00 
2,258,055.50 

1.956.608.00 

2.040. 796. 25 

2.019.587.00 
2,125,881.70 

1.896. 815.25 

1. 831. 838. 00 

2.093.291.00 
1,952,688.22 

2. 102. 128. 00 
2, 077, 16a 00 


August 




October 


November 


December 






1890. 

.Tannorv_ 






February 1 1,750,000 

March 1 2,000,000 

April j 1,243,722 


17, 500. 00 
20,000.00 
12,437.22 


June . . : 










13, 463, 247 


134,632.47 


24,706,256.92 


Total j 



Digitized by 



Google 










202 REPORT OK THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

Summary of the Deposits of the Precious Metals in the Mints of the Re- 
public during the Fiscal Year 188^90. 



Methods of treatment. 



Mints. 



Alamos 

Culiaean 

Chihuahua 

Durango 

Guadalajara 

Guanajuato 

Hermosillo 

Mexico 

Oaxaca 

San Luis Potosi . - 
Zacatecas 

Total 



Patio. 



Tonel. 



Lixivia- 

tion. 



Fire. 



[ Old and I old plate, 
worn coin. , F 



Pan. 



Kilograms. 



Kilo- 

grams. 



5, 655. 993 
33, 639. 409 
6, 736. 290 
37, 693. 236 
102. 165. 600 
2. 525. 720 
140. 8:7. IS 5 
0*2. 511 
37, 683. 560 
103,601.136 



31.262 



Kilo- 
grams. 
5, 199. 500 
9. 392.020 
15, 035. 861 
2, 538. 920 
805. 341 



13,827.510 

2,029.702 



6, 425. 770 
96. 85i 



. ! 477, 220. Q50 ,15. 8 68 . 474 '39, 494. 263 



Kilo- 
gra ms. 
1. 858. 322 
6, 589. 125 
3, 505. 982 
17, 026. 310 
2, 518. 420 



Kilo- 

grams. 

4, 285. 193 
3, 573. 055 
12, 918. 778 



Kilo- 

grams. 



443.860 



3, 334. 760 
[31, 979. 114 
114. 992 
7, 796. 380 
6, 532. 410 



28,200 
452.500 
646. 620 
82. 780 
|10, 287. 355 
800.871 
842. 938 



81,255. 815 



20,777.026 



13,585.124 



KUo- 
. grams. 



158.188 



1, 501. 888 
80.404 



1,740.480 







Silver. 


Gold* 




Mints. 


Total 

weight. 


Total of 
pure silver. 


Value at 
$39,109 per 
kilogram. 


Fine gold 
contained. 


Value 
at $643,529 
per kilo- 
gram. 


Total value. 


Alamos 


Kilograms. 


Kilograms. 
10, 844.289 




Kilograms. 






11, 343. 015 


$424, 109. 31 


74. 024331 


$47, 636. 78 


$471, 746. 09 


Culiacan 


25, 654. 053 


24, 863. 253 


972, 376. 93 


46. 182620 


29,719. 86 


1, 002, 096. 79 


Chihuahua 

Duran <*■<>_ . . _ 


65,100.030 
26, 329. 720 
41,65*. 947 


63, 186. 372 
25, 616. 408 
41, 220. 474 


2, 471, 155. 82 
1, 001, 832. 13 


38. 942000 


25, 060. 30 


2.496. 216. 12 

1.001.832.13 
1, 637. 251. 20 


Guadalajara 


*1,613, 207.06 


35.599000 


*24, 044. 14 


Guanajuato 


102,812.220 


101,268.352 


*3, 984, 770. 97 


472. 996500 


*318,845.23 


*4, 303, 616. 20 


Hermosillo 


12, 369. 030 


12,015.641 


469, 919. 72 


2.964200 


1. 907.56 


471,827.28 


Mexico 


204, 433. 062 


198,933.194 


*7, 808. 664. 39 


442. 441000 


*295, 666. 70 


*8, 104, 331. 09 


Oaxaca 


3, 805. 331 


[ 3, 596. 979 j 


*141,827.01 


23. 237700 


*15, 695. 11 


*157,522. 12 


San Luis Potosi 


46, 322. 878 


45,837.772 ! 


1, 792, 669. 42 




1, 792, 669. 42 


Zacatecas 


110, 133. 546 


105,553.145 


*4, 134, 432. 52. 


328. 231300 


*220, 484. 07 


*4, 354, 916. 59 


Total 


649, 961. 832 


632, 935. 879 


24, 814, 965. 28 


1,464.618651 


979, 059. 75 


>5. 794 025 03 



* Includes the value of the silver and gold destined for exportation. 



Note. — W e have assigned tlie values of $39,109 per kilogram to the silver and 
$643,529 per kilogram to the gold by the deduction of the lawful miut charges for 
coinage, hut by giving the true corresponding value it would be at the rate of 
$40,915 per kilogram for the first and $675,416 per kilogram for the second, resulting 
iu a total value of the deposits for the year named of $25,896,571.49 for the silver and 
$989,226.87 for the gold, making a total of $26,885,798.36. 



Digitized by C.ooQLe 







REPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OP THE MINT. 



263 

Data of the Coinage had in Mints of the Republic during Fiscal Year 

1890 -’ 91 . 



Mints. 



Alamos 511,500.! 

Culiacan 817,049*] 

Cliihnaliua 2, 059, 245 ! 

Durango ^ . . .. 

Guadalajara 

Guanajuato ! 3,522,000 



Denominations of currency. 



Silver. 



Number 
pieces of 
1 dollar. 



Hemio8illo . 

Mexico 

Oaxaca 

San Luis Potosi. 
Zacatecas 



Total coinage. 




Number 
pieces of 
50 cents. 


Number 
pieces of 
25 cents. 


Number 1 Number 
pieces of j pieces of 
10 cents. | 5 cents. 


Value 
of silver 
coined. 






1 

30,000 1 20.000 

131,720 | 116.000 

187,320 j 95.040 

138,5.2 i 13G,:.5U 

349,185! 50,000 

455, 000 1 230, 000 1 

21.500 ! 1 


$515, 500. 00 
852, 502. 00 
2, 082. 729. 00 
1,2 2, 5 17. 75 
1, 752. 350. 50 
1 3, 597. 850, 00 
! 562. 960. 00 

1 7,910.200.00 
224, 600. 00 
1,400, 210.00 
4, 046, 000. 00 




63, 512 


:::::::::::: 


30, 723 


1 | 


| 75, 400 






795.000 ! 1, 354,000 

15,000 ] 34,000 

230,800 239,400 

805.000 ! 520,000 






i | 




8, 640 
52, 000 


230, 275 3, 1 59, 067 2, 794, 856 


24, 237. 449. 25 



Denominations of currency. 

Gold. 





Number 
picrcs of 
20 dollars. 


Number 1 
pieces ut 
10 dollars. | 


Number j 
pieces of 
5 dollars, j 


1 N umber 
1 pieces of 
1 dollar. 


Number 
pieces of 
50 cents. 


Value of gold 
coined. 


Alamos 




2,790 I 








$27,900 
14, 889 
47,400 




237 


918 | 




9G9 




Chihuahua 


2,370 








Durango... 








Guadalajara 

Guana.) u a to 

Hcrmosillo 


1,876 | 


f- ' 




1 


27,500 


Mexico 


8, 202 


i 133 ; 


80$ 


1,316 j 


608 | 


169, 731 


Oaxaca 


San Luis Potosi 




L 1 








Zacatecas 




1,911 | 




738 


326 1 


20,663 








Total coinage 


12, 184 


5,752 i 


305 ! 


3,023 1 


934 


308,083 




:...! 







Mints. 



Denominations of currency. 



Copper. 



Alamos i $543,400.00 

Culiacan ' 1 1 807, 391. 00 

Chilmahua : 2, 130, 129. 00 



Durango 

Guadalajara 

Guanajuato 

Hcrmosillo 

Mexico 

Oaxaca 

San Luis Potosi . 
Zacatecas 



Total coinage 21, 886, 961 218, 869. 61 s 24, 764, 401. 86 



21,886,961 , $218,869.61 



1,292,547. 75 
1. 752, 350. 50 
3, 625, 350. 00 
562. 960. 00 
8, 298. 800. 61 
224,600.00 
1, 400, 210. 00 
4, 066, 663. 00 



I 



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2G4 REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

Comparative Table op Coinage in Mints op the Republic during Fiscal 
Years 189(M91 and 1889-*90. 



Mints. 



Value of 
silver coined, 
fiscal year 
1890-91. 



Alamos 

Culiacan 

Chihuahua 

Durango 

Guadalajara 

Guanajuato 

Hermosillo 

Mexico 

Oaxaca 

San Luis Potosi 
Zacatecas 



$515, 500. 00 
852, 502. 00 
2, 082, 729. 00 
1, 292, 547. 75 
1, 752, 350. 50 
3, 597, 850. 00 
502, 960. 00 
7, 910, 200.00 
224, 600. 00 
1,400,210.00 
4, 046, 000. 00 



Total 124,237, 449.25 

Increase in value of gold coined | 



Value of 
silver coined, 
fiscal year 
1889- s 90. 



Increase in 
fiscal year 
1890- s 91. 



I 

Decrease in! 
fiscal year 
1890-' 91. 



I $435,300.00 

1.018.790.00 

2.563.677.00 
1,033,069.75 

l 1,688.004.70 
I 3, 545, 750. 00 
| 495, 900. 00 

7, 386, 300. 00 
! 120, 900. 00 

j 1,881,335.00 
4, 159, 300. 00 



24, 328, 326. 45 



$80, 200. 00 



259, 478. oo 
64, 345. 80 
52, 100. 00 
67, 060. 00 
523, 900. 00 
103, 700.00 



1, 150, 783. 80 



$166,288 

480,948 



481,125 

113,300 



1,241,661 



Value of 
gold 
coined, 
1890-’91. 



$27,900 

14.889 

47,400 



27,500 

160,731 



20,663 

308,083 



Decrease in value of silver coined. 



90, 877. 20 



Mints. 


Value 

of-gold 

coined, 

1889-'90. 


Increase 
in fiscal 
year 
1890-’91. 


Decrease 
in fiscal 
vear 
1890-’91. 


Value i Value 
of copper j of copper 
coined } coined 1 
fiscal vear fiscal year 
1890-^91. ; 1889-*90. 


Increase 
in fiscal 
year 
1890- 91. 


Decrease 
in fiscal 
year 
1890-’91. 




$45,580 
1 33, 555 

13,380 




$17, 680 
18, 666 


| | 



















$34, 020 




































Guana lyato 


13, 436 


14,064 












Hermosillo 












Mexico 

Oaxaca 


109,690 


60, 041 




$218,869.61 


$134, 632. 47 


'$84, 237.14 




San Luis Potosi 
















Zacatecas 


27, 657 




6,994 


1 1 








Total 

Increase in value of gold 
coined. 

Decrease in value of silver 
coined. 












243, 298 1 


108,125 


| 43, 340 

64,785 I 


218, 869. 61 1 
i In value 
coined . . . 


1 134,632.47 
of copper 


84,237.14 


$84, 237.14 

















Mints. 



Alamos 

Culiacan 

Chihuahua 

Durango 

Guadalajara 

Guanajuato 

Hermosillo 

Mexico 

Oaxaca 

San Luis Potosi 

Zacatecas 

Total 

Increase in the value of total coinage 



Total value 
coinage fiscal 
year 1890-’91. 


Total value 
coinage fiscal 
year 1889- '90. 


Increase in 
fiscal year 
1890- 91. 


Decrease in 
fiscal year 
1890- 91. 


$543. 400. 00 
807,391.00 
2, 130, 129. 00 
1,292, 547. 75 


$480, 880. 00 

1. 052. 345. 00 

2. 577. 057. 00 
1,033,009. 75 
1, 688, 004. 70 
3, 559. 186. 00 

495, 900, 00 
7, 630, 622.47 
120. 900. 00 
1, 881 , 335. 00 

4. 186. 957. 00 


$62, 520. 00 

259. 478. 00 
64, 345. 80 

66.164.00 

67. 060. 00 
668,178.14 

103.700.00 




$184,954.00 
446, 928. 00 


1, 752, 350. 50 
1 3, 625, 350. 00 
562, 960. 00 
8, 208, 800. 61 
224, 600. 00 
1.400. 210.00 
4, 066, 663. 00 




481,125.66 
120, 294. 00 


|24, 764, 401. 86 


24, 706, 256. 92 


1,291,445.94 


1, 233, 301. 00 
58, 144. 94 


1 | 







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REPORT OF THE' DIRECTOR OF THE MINT, 



265 



R£sum£ of Precious Metals Entered at Mints of the Republic during Fiscal 

Year 1890 -’ 91 . 



Mints. 



Patio process. 



Alamos 

Culiacan 

Chihuahua 

Durango 

Guadalajara 

Guanajuato 

Hermosillo 

Mexico 

Oaxaca -v- 

San Luis Potosi . - . 
Zacatecas 



Total entries, 1890-’91. 
Total entries, 1883-90. 



Increase in 1890-’91. 
Decrease in 1890-91. 



Systems of reduction. 



Kilograms. 



6,261. 768 
12, 125. 905 
9,457. 355 
38, 703. 500 
108, 890. 260 
3, 161. 540 
147, 106. 433 
1, 712. 196 
25, 784. 141 
102, 691. 631 



455,894.789 
477, 220. 650 



21, 325. 861 



Barrel pro- 



KUograms. 



24, 395. 499 
2, 004. 873 



26, 400. 372 
15, 888. 474 



10, 511. 898 



Lixiviation 

process. 



Kilograms. 
8, 320. 760 
5,827.115 



3,896. 720 
672.756 



9, 537. 060 



217. 170 



28, 471. 581 
39, 494. 263 



11, 022. 682 



Roasting 

process. 



Kilograms. 
1, 608. 520 
7,576.729 
17, 818. 390 
20, 640. 745 
3, 915. 094 



2, 609. 320 
‘ 27. 959. 310 
. 299. 055 
9, 481. 609. 
1, 074. 240 



93, 003. 012 
81,255.815 



11, 747. 197 



Pan process. 



Kilograms , 

3, 129. 286 
1, 218. 282 
25, p23. 780 



29, 371. 348 
20,777. 026 



• 8, 594. 322 



Mints. 



Proceeds of — 



Worn and 
counterfeit 
coin. 



Old plate and 
ola silver. 



Total weight 
according to 
grade. 



Silver. 



Total of pure 
silver. 



Value at 
$39,109 per 
kilogram. 



Alamos 

Culiacan 

Chihuahua 

Durango 

Guadalajara 

Guanajuato 

Hermosillo 

Mexico 

Oaxaca 

San Luis Potosi. 
Zacatecas 



Kilograms. 
649. 650 



Kilograms. 



168. 690 
256. 253 
188. 135 
91. 220 
9, 308.481 
1. 924. 936 
371.272 
28. 330 



156, 040 
9. 725 



1, 511.853 
104.968 



13.750 



Kilograms. 
13, 058. 566 
21, 533. 544 
54, 988. 075 
34, 163. 510 
43, 703. 703 

109. 088. 120 
15, 599. 1-iO 

210, 281. 576 
6, 046. 028 
35, 637. 022 

104.025.121 



Kilograms. 
12, 003, 067 
20, 775. 837 
52, 019. 542 
83, 317. 400 
43, 289. 080 
106, 839. 459 
14, 731.546 
205, 689. 496 
5, 759. 057 
35, 283.433 
102, 633. 878 



$492, 
812, 
2, 034, 
*1, 303, 
*1,694, 
*4,209, 
*577, 
*8,066, 
*225, 
1, 379, 
*4, 018, 



893.35 
522.20 
432. 28 
027. 43 
151.22 
509. 02 
246. 45 
544.73. 
615. 67 
899. 77 
940. 26 



Total entries, 1890- 91 . 
Total entries, 1889-’90. 



Increase in 1890- 91. 
Decrease in 1890-’91 . 



12, 986. 967 
13, 585. 124 



1, 796. 336 
1, 740. 480 



647, 924. 405 
649, 961. 832 



632, 941. 795 *24, 814, 782. 38 
632,935.879 1*24,814,965.28 



* 598.157 



55. 856 



2, 037. 427 



5. 916 



182.90 



Mints. 



Gold. 



Total of 
pure gold. 



Value at 
$643,529 per 
kilogram. 



Total value. 



Alamos 

Culiacan .1 

Chihuahua 

Durango 

Guadalajara. . . 

Guanajuato 

' Hermosillo 

Mexico 

Oaxaca 

San Luis Potosi . 
Zacatecas 



Kilograms. 
35. 615 
23. 914 
71. 450 
.565 
36. 755 
563.929 
23. 751 
370. 367 
15. 458 



$322,919. 14 

15.389. 16 

45. 980. 16 
*381.32 

*24, 824. 92 
*379, 783, 87 
*16, 027. 38 
*245, 378. 43 
*10,440.64 



487.960 



*328, 577. 30 



$515, 
827, 
2,080, 
*1,303, 
*1,718, 
*4, 589, 
*593, 
*8, 311, 
*236, 
1,379, 
*4, 347, 



812.49 
911.36 
412.44 
408. 75 
976. 14 
292. 89 
273. 83 
923. 16 
056. 31 
899.77 
517.56 



Total entries, 1890-’91. 
Total entries, 1889-90. 



Increase in 1890-’91 . 
Decrease in 1890-’91 . 



1, 629. 764 
1,464. 619 



*1, 089, 702. 32 
*979, 059. 75 



*25,904,484.70 
*25, 794, 025. 03 



165. 145 



*110, 642. 57 



*110, 459.67 



*Tnciuding weights and values of precious metals designed for exportation, expressed in following 
Table. 



Digitized by GiOOQle 





266 REPORT OK THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Precious Metals Designed foii Exportation Entered at Mints, 1890-^91. 



Mints. 


Silver. | 


Gold. 


Total value. 

9 


Weight. 


Value. 


Weight. 


Value. 


Durans*. 

Guadalajara 

Guanajuato 

Hermosillo 

Mexico 

Oaxaca 

Zacatecas 

Total entered 1890-’91 . . . 
Total entered 1889~’90 . . . 

llw'rPDAA ii> IR'ft-'Ol 


Kilograms. 
9.538 
641. 537 
17. 234. 033 
01 1 831 
12,311.323 
213. 021 
2, 786. 240 


$390.25 
26, 248.48 
705. 130. 46 
25. 157.04 
503,717. 80 
8, 715. 75 
113. 999. Q1 ] 


Kilogram*. 
0.565 
36. 755 
529. 338 
23.304 
220.671 1 
15.458 | 
456.637 j 


$381.32 
24,824.92 
357, 523. 30 
15. 739. 76 
149, 044. 73 
10,440.64 
308,420.06 


$771.57 
51,073.40 
1,062,653.76 
40,896.60 
652, 762. 53 
19, 156. 39 
422,419.07 


33, 810. 553 
34,039.857 


1, 383, 358. 79 
1, 392, 740. 76 


1,282.728 
1, 145. 771 


866,37473 

773,871.99 


2,249,733.52 
2, 166, 612. 76 






136.957 


92,502.74 


83,120.77 


in IH'.M— 111 1 


229.304 


6,381.97 











NICARAGUA. 

Legation of the United States in Central America, 

Guatemala, November SO, 1890 . 

Sir: As required by circular from the Department of State, dated December 18, 
1889, the following are the translations of the replies of the Republic of Nicaragua 
to the eleven questions contained therein: 

Answers to interrogatories, 1889. 

(1) No gold coinage whatever in 1889 nor at any time anterior, as there is no estab- 
lished government mint. 

(2) The same as to silver. 

(3) There was no importation of gold and the exportation was 10,990 ounces in 
bars. 

(4) The importation of coined silver was $307,373 and the exportation was $273,424 ; 
none in bars. 

(5) The weight of gold produced was 687 kilograms of the value of $164, 86L 

(6) There was no silver produced. 

(7) There were no gold bars at the end of 1889, as the miners sent the gold away 
as it was mined. 

(8) No silver was produced. 

(9) The circulation of Treasury notes at the end of 1889 was $99,049, and of th© 
banks, $570,000 (in fact the Treasury notes are $72,463, as they are being redeemed). 

(10) There was no law passed in relation to coinage or notes. 

(11) There is no mint. 

I have the honor to be your obedient servant, 

Lansing B. Miznkr, 

United States Minister . 

The Director of the Mint, 

Washington, D. C. 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



Consulate of the United States, 

Buenos Ayres j January 28, 1891. 

Sir: Referring to my dispatch numbered 941, in which I gave the decree of the 
Argentine Government to demonetize all foreign gold coins, I now have to inform 
you that said decree has been annulled and that foreign gold will continue to be 
legal tender in the Argentine Republic. I think it has been discovered that of the 
6,146,551 “argentinos” (5 pesos) coined to date nearly two-thirds have left the 
country and perhaps have been in great part recoined. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. L. Baker, 

Consul . 



The Secretary of State, 

Washington, D . C. 



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REPORT OF TOE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 267 



Legation of the United States, 

Buenos Ayres , April 21, 1891. 

Sir: I have the honor to state that in reply to my communication under instrnc 
tion of December 10, 1890, to this Government for information concerning the 
product and importation to this Republic of gold and silver, and the decrees in 
these relations, I received on the 18th instant a note from the foreign office, which is 
sent herewith in copy and translation, and in which is incorporated a transcript of 
a letter to that office from the minister of the treasury. I regret the delay in get- 
ting this note, and the better to suffice the desired inquiry, made direct application, 
thus far unanswered, to the treasury department, for the same information. As I 
have not, despites everal efforts made, received the financial data sought by a 
circular instruction under the date of June 23, 1890, at the request of the Secretary 
of the Interior and instance of the Superintendent of the Census, I trust the 
in-closure may to some extent suffice that instruction. 

The lack of promptitude exhibited here at times in answer to statistical inquiries 
is largely due to the disquiets prevailing in the departments by reason of the gen- 
eral financial embarrassment and the remedial projects under consideration. 

I have the honor, etc., , 

John R. G. Pitkin* 



The Secretary of State, 

Washington, D. C. 



Buenos Ayres, April 7, 1891 . 

Mr. Minister : With reference to the letter of your legation, dated January 28, 
last, and to the despatch of this ministry of February 5, laBt, I have the honor of 
transmitting to your excellency the following information which has just been 
received from the treasury department. 

It says thus : 

“ Ministry of the Treasury, 

Buenos Ayres, April 6, 1891 . 

“ To Mr. Minister of Foreign Affairs , Di\ Don Eduardo Costa : 

“Mr. Minister: In answer to the letter from your ministry of Febuary 5, last, 
accompanying a letter from the legation of the United States, requesting data of the 
movement of metals and the fiduciary circulation during the year 1890, I have the 
satisfaction of communicating to your excellency the following information, classi- 
fied in the formal order, for the before-mentioned legation, as follows : 



“ Answers to interrogatories, 1890. 



“(1) During the year 1890 there was no gold coinage. 

“ (2) The same with regard to silver. 

“(3) The importation of gold represented $6,925,384, which sum was divided as 
follows : 

‘‘Coined gold $6,909,364 

“Leal' gold tor bookbinders, gilders, etc 1 16, 020 



“ There was no importation of gold in bullion. 

“(4) The importation of silver was $163, 017, all in coin, and the exportation was 
$775,529, consisting of $274,528 in coin and $501,271 in bullion. 

“(5) The production of gold from the mines of the Republic amounted to 123.290 
kilograms. 

“ (6) The production of silver from the mines of the Republic was 14,681.267 kilo- 
grams. 

“(7) It is estimated that the amount of gold coin here at the end of the year 1890 
was $13,229,468. There are no data concerning the quantity of gold bullion in exist- 
ence here at this date. 

“(8) The amount of silver money in existence at the end of the year 1890 we can 
estimate at $200,000. 

“There are no data concerning the quantity of silver bullion in existence at this 
date. 



“(9) The total amount of bank notes in circulation reached $254,171,645. 

“(10) The laws and decrees concerning money, made in 1890, are as follows: 
“Law No. 2701, July 16, authorizing the emission of $100,000,000 in mortgage 
1 ond8. 

“Law No. 2702, July 20, authorizing the emission of $35,116,000 in public funds to 
guarantee the emission allowed to the National Bank and the Provincial Bank of 
Buenos Ayres. 



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4 k. 



2G8 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



“Law No. 2707, August 21, augmenting the smaller emission l>v $6,000,000. 

“Law No, 2715, of September 6, authorizing the emission of $6u,000,000 in Treasury 
notes, and abolishing that of the $100,000,000 of July 16. 

“Law No. 2718, of September 5, concerning the transfer of titles of 4£ per cent to 
fund the issue of the National Bank. 

“Law No. 2741, October 7, creating a bank of conversion. 

“Law No. 2746, October 10, concerning the conversion of bank notes. 

“ Decree of November 24, prohibiting the trading in gold in the commercial ex- 
change. 

“Decree of November 24, prescribing that the operations of foreign exchange shall 
be restricted to legal currency. 

“Decree of November 25, authorizing the Provincial Bank of Cordoba to put in 
circulation $3,000,000 in notes denominated * Bonos Agricolas. 1 

“Decree of November 27, concerning the sale of public funds at 41 per cent for the 
bank of conversion. 

“Decree of December 5, demonetizing all foreign coins and prohibiting their legal 
circulation in the Republic. 

“(11). The report of the mint, included in the report of the treasury department, 
will shortly be sent to your ministry. 

“I call your excellency’s attention to the fact that the data concerning the mineral 
production are only approximate, and they indicate solely the transactions through 
the custom-house, as there are no national mining statistics; and so also are the 
estimates of gold and silver in existence merely approximate, because the private 
banks do not furnish information to the public offices except when expressly requested 
to do so. 

“ In regard to the copies of the laws and decrees referring to the legislation of the 
year, they will be found in the summary which I will shortly have the honor of 
sending to the ministry of your excellency. 

“I salute your excellency with my distinguished consideration. 

“Vicente F. Lopez." 

As soon as the treasury department sends me the report and summary referred to 
I will transmit both documents to your excellency. 

I renew to your excellency the assurance of my most distinguished consideration. 

Eduardo Costa. 

Mr. John R. G. Pitkin, 

Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States. 



COLOMBIA. 

Legation of the United States, 

Bogota , August 28, 1890. 

Sir : From the able report of Dr. Vicente Restrepo, the minister of the treasury, I 
have extracted certain interesting information as to the financial condition of Co- 
lombia. 

Gold coin circulated freely up to 1863. In the Bogota mint large sums, from 
$1,000,000 to $3,000,000 annually, were coined up to 1851. From 1851 to 1863 the 
coinage was from $100,000 to $330,000 annually. From 1864 to 1877 only $399,000 were 
coined, and since that time there has been no gold coinage. There was also con- 
siderable coinage at the Medellin mint in 1860 ana 1876. At present there is no gold 
in circulation. 

Silver coin began to leave the country in 1875. In 1884 the amount in circulation 
was so small that the business of the country was transacted with difficulty. In 
1885 the National Bank was authorized to issue paper money up to $2,000,000, and 
in 1887 the amount was increased to $12,000,000, at which figure it has since remained. 

Without doubt the paper money has been of great benefit to the country in the 
emergency which was upon it. The minister recognizes this, but, at the same time, 
regards its issue as a temporary measure, and assures the public that every effort 
will be made to replace paper with coin as soon as circumstances will permit. 

In addition to the $12,000,000 of the National Bank, there are in circulation $9,422,- 
002 of bills of private banks, $4,243,297 of silver (0.500 fine), and $3,500,000 of nickel, 
making the total circulation $29,165,299 for 4,000,000 of inhabitants. 

Silver coin, 0.835 fine, circulates also in Oucuta, Pasta, and the Isthmus of Panama, 
where the paper money is not accepted ; but the total amount of the silver, 0.835 and 
0.900 fine, in the rest of the country does not exeeed $1,000,000, and is simply an ar- 
ticle of merchandise, the former being at about 40 and the latter 50 per cent pre- 
mium over paper. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



269 



The national debt is divided into the foreign and interior. 

The foreign debt may be stated as follows, reckoning $5 to the pound sterling. 

Principal - $9, 507, 500. 00 

Interest to June 30, 1890 (eleven years, at 4£ per cent) 4, 999, 018. 00 

Interest due June 30, 1879 * . . . . ! .. . 4, 800. 00 

Total gold. . 14, 571,318.00 

The interior debt is — 

Consolidated * . $5,043,490.00 

Floating . . 7,384,565.00 

. Total paper 12, 428, 055. 00 

t . 

Or in gold i 6, 214, 028. 00 

To this add foreign debt 14, 571, 318. 00 

Total 20,785,346.00 

Add to this $4,399,584 (claims already recognized as result of last war) reduced 
to a gold basis, $2,199,792. 

Total debt in gold, $22,985,138. To this add $7,390,220 (estimate of amount of war v 
claims to be recognized) reduced to a gold basis, $3,695,110. 

The total probable debt in near future on gold basis, $26,680,248; or, expressed in 
the money of the country at present rate of exchange, $53,360,496. 

The foreign debt draws 4f per cent interest. Of the consolidated interior debt 
$1,754,560 draws 6 per cent interest, $2,204,390 draws 4J- per cent interest, $1,084,540 
draws 3 per cent interest. 

The interest upon the floating debt varies from nothing to 6 per cent. 

There is a system in vogue for paying the interior debt by monthly sales. The 
creditors offer the Government their evidences of debt for a certain per centum of 
their face value, payable in bills of the National Bank, and the most advantageous 
offer is, of course, accepted. In this manner $8,421,207.10 of the debt has been paid 
since January, 1887, with $4,569,996.30 of National Bank bills. 

The foreign debt was made the subject of an arrangement between the creditors 
and the Government in 1873 ; but as no interest has be^n paid for ten years, a new 
arrangement was concluded in 1889 between the parties which is to be submitted to 
the Congress, now in session, for approval. As soon as this body passes a law in re- 
gard to the same I will forward a copy and translation of the arrangement; not doing 
so now because of the expected changes in the original proposal. 

I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

John T. Abbott. 

The Secretary of State, 

Washington , D. C. 



Legation of the United States of America, 

Bogota , December 11, 1890. 

Sir : I am in receipt of your esteemed favor of the 31st October requesting me to 
obtain and forward to your Bureau an approximate statement of the quantity of 
gold and silver produced from mines of the Republic of Colombia during the year 
1890. 

I have given this subject considerable attention during the last six mouths and 
believe the following figures to be a very close approximation of the facts : 



Gold $3,300,000 

Sdver 1,340,000 



These sums are taken from the best attainable sources and have been carefully 
considered and indorsed by the best individual authority in Colombia. 

Trusting that they may reach you in good time, 

I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

John T. Abbott. 



The Director of the Mint, 

Washington, JQ, C, 



Legation of the United States, 

Bogota, ApHl 27, 1891 . 

Sir: I inclose herewith a copy and translation of a decree whereby the silver coin 
500 fine is to be retired from circulation and the paper money is to be redeemed 
with silver coin 835. 

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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



As you will see by my No. 123, of August 28, 1890, the paper money in circulation 
amounts to $12,000,000 and the silver coin 500, line to about $4,250,000. 

Under the inclosed decree the National Bank is now collecting the 500 fine coin and 
sending the same to Europe to pay for the new coin 835 fine. 

I am not now informed that the Government has other means than the product of 
these $4,250,000 of debased silver which can be applied to the redemption of the 
paper money. 

This laudable attempt to resume specie payments will be watched with interest. 

I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

John T. Abbott. 

The Secretary of State. 



Decree No. 200 of 1891 (April 1), by which Silver Coin 500 Fine is Retired. 

The President of the Republic considering : 

(1) That the paper money, notwithstanding the confidence which it iuspires and 
the high credit it enjoys in the country, can not become at par with the silver coin of 
835 fine for which the Government is under obligation to exchange it, because its 
value has become equal to that of the silver coin 500 fine, and the Tatter on account 
of the intrinsic value it represents will always he worth less than the former; 

(2) That the Government is disposed and the national banks prepared to redeem 
the paper money with silver coin 835 fine without in any respect altering the legal- 
tender quality of the former; 

(3) That, once established, the exchange of national bills on i>resentation for silver 
coin 835 fine, the circulation of the coin 500 fine will not be able to continue on 
account of its being incompatible with the former; and 

(4) That the coinage of the silver coin 500 fine was caused by transitory circum- 
stances which do not now exist; 

DECREES. 

Article 1. — Ninety days after the publication of this decree in the “Diario Ofi- 
cial” individuals shall not be obliged to receive in payment of debts the silver coin 
500 fine. 

Article 2. — Said coin shall be received in payment of public revenues and taxes 
only up to the 31st day of December of the current year. 

Article 3. — The National Bank shall, at once, proceed to retire the coin 500 fine, 
changing it on presentation at offices which are or may hereafter be established 
for that purpose. 

Article 5 (4).^— The sums in said coin which may be remitted by mail to the 
National Bank or to its offices of conversion shall be carried free of postage. 

Publish. 

Done in Bogota, April 1, 1891. 

Carlos Holguin. 

The Minister of the Treasury, 

Marcelino Arango. 

Published in No. 8386 of the “ Diario Oficial,” April 4, 1891. 



Legation of the United States, 

Bogota, August 15, 1891 . 

Sir: In accordance with the request of the State Department, I have the honor 
herewith to answer the interrogatories of the circular of December 10, 1890. 



(1) None. 

(2) None. 

(3) Imports, none. 

Exports : 

Bara 

Dust 

Jewels 

Coin 

Ore (in part silver) . . 

Total..... 



Answers to interrogatories , 1890. 



$3,104,148 

401. 188 

40,701 

183,759 

664, 078 

.......... t y . 4, 393. 872 

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REPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 271 f 

(4) Imports t 33 bars, weighing 1,994 kilograms. 

Exports: . 

liars. $1,058,566 

Coin 399,099 

Ore (see No. 3). 

Total 1,457,665 

(5, 6, 7, and 8) No reliable data can be obtained. • 

(9) Notes of private banks : 

In Antioquia $371,686.25 

In Bolivar 133,760.00 

In Canca 367, 510. 80 

National Bank notes * 12, 000, 000. 00 

Total 12,872,957.05 



(10) None. 

(11) None is published. 

The above report is based upon information most kindly furnished by the minister 
, for foreign affairs of Colombia. 

1 am, sir, your obedient servant, 

John T. Abbott, 

' Minister, 

The Director of the Mint, 

Washington, D. C, 



Legation of the United States, 

Bogota , September 3, 1891 . 

Sir: Upon August 15 last I forwarded to you the statistics of the exports of gold 
and silver from this Republic, according to the figures furnished by the Colombian 
foreign office. 

I now have the honor to transmit the views of Dr. Vicente Restrepo, who is, per- 
haps, the best individual authority upon this subject in Colombia. 

In a recently published article of some length, Dr. Restrepo reviews the situation, 
refers to the extreme difficulty of procuring correct data, and presents his own con- 
clusions. 

A translation of the main portion of the article in question is annexed. 

I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

John T. Abbott. 

The Director of the Mint, 

Washington , D. C . 



Translation of an article by Dr. Vicente Restrepo, upon the production of gold and silver 
in Colombia from 1887 to 1890 , inclusive. 

Upon former occasions we have complained that the official data relative to the 
exportation of precious metals are extremely deficient and confusing. Sen or Don 
Felipe Paul, minister of finance, says in his report to the Congress of 1888: “No 
approximate calculation of the exportation of metals can be obtained, since the sta- 
tistics in this particular are of little value.” 

This, however, does not discourage us; we shall attempt to fix, with the closest 
approximation possible, the actual production of the gold and silver mines of Colom- 
bia, and, with this object in view, we have compiled aata collected from various sec- 
tions of the Republic. 

We find the most tedious and difficult part of our work already done. A distin- 
guished foreigner, who compiles every year, with great intelligence, the data as to 
our imports and exports taken from the statistical tables furnished by the collectors 
of ports to the minister of finance, has had the kindness to place at our disposal the 
following table. This will serve as a basis for our estimates. 



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/ 

272 REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. M 



Table of the Principal Mineral Products Exported from the Republic of 

Colombia in 1890. 



Terms employed in the 
statistical tables for- 
warded by collectors of 
ports. 


Barranquilla. 


Cartagena. 


Buenaventura. 


Total. 


Kilos. 


Value. 


Kilos. 


Value. 


Kilos. 


Value. 


Kilos. 


Value. 






$1, 891, 807 
71, 191 
960 










1 


$1,891,807 
337, 989 
960 
120, 279 






266 


$217, 616 


138 


$49, 182 


404 






Gold 




99, 746 
61, 714 
7, 349 
1,410 


33 


19, 233 


8 


1,300 


36 








61,714 

7,349 

1,410 

682,037 

61,482 

6,074 

372,023 

400 


‘ 4 Partescle oro^ (old gold ?) 
Gold in various forms. . . . 


























Silver in bars 




682, 037 
61, 482 
6, 074 












Auriferous 








. 






Silver and gold 














Gold and silver in bars . . 




372,’ 023 












Dusts of gold and silver 

(join 




400 












Gold bars and silver coin . 
Ores . 




21, 221 
635, 093 
*845 












21, 221 
645,013 
6,970 


1, 136, 822 


16, 298 

4 


9,600 

•925 


848 


320 


1, 153, 968 
19 


Platinum 


15 


5,200 






1 


Total 


1, 136, 822 * 


3,913, 352 


16, 601 


247,374 


1,004 


56,002 


1, 154,427 


4,216,728 





Any examination of this table, whether cursory or detailed, only serves to produce 
confusion. What should the reason understand by “gold in packages,” “partes de 
oro (old gold!),” “gold in various forms,” and “dusts of gold”? 

Do the terms “gold” or “gold and silver” mean coin or those metals in their 
natural state? 

What metals are included under the generic name of minerals (or ore) ? 

Are the declared values in foreign or national money ? 

A careful study of the matters will enable us to solve all those difficulties. 

The gold and silver which enters the national administration of finance in Medellin 
fbr exportation are in bars, and their value is stated in foreign money, i. «., in gold. 

In 1890 the value of gold bars exported through the aforesaid channel was $2,470,536 ; 
that of silver bars was $734,981 ; a total of $3,205,517. 

All these pass through Barranquilla on their way to Europe or the United States. 
We ought, therefore, to find them, noted in the table of exportations from Barran- 
quilla. 

As this is so confused let us see .if it be possible to make up the sums desired. 



Gold bars 

Bars of gold and dust 
Gold 



Gold in packages 

“Partes de oro” (old gold?). 

Gold in various forms 

Gold and silver in bars 

Gold bars and silver coin . . . 



$1,891,807 
960 
99, 746 
61,714 
7,349 
1,410 
372,023 
21, 221 






Total 2,456,230 

A sum very like that of $2,470,536, which represents the gold exported in bars from 
Antioquia (Medellin). 

We will adopt the latter as the safest in the table of exports, which we will make 
hereafter. 

We shall find the silver exported under these two heads : 



Silver in bars - $682, 037 

Auriferous silver * - 61, 482 

Total 743,519 



A sum but little more than that of $734,981, which was exported from Antioquia 
(Medellin). We will adopt the latter. 

To these two sums must be added $71,191 in gold dust exported through Barran- 
quilla. 

Leaving ores to be considered hereafter, let us pass to the custom-house of Car- 
tagena. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



273 



Here tlie exports are given as follows : 





Kilograms. 


Value. 


Onlr) ^unt, I ... 


266 


$217,616 


Gold 


33 


19,233 


Total 


299 


236,849 







Comparing the weight of the gold with its value, we see that, even were it all 
800 fine, it wonld not be worth more than $166,000 in foreign money. Let us take, 
then, this last sum. 

The statistical tables of the custom-house of Buenaventura are entirely deficient, 
since they only show an exportation of $49,182 in gold dust, $1,300 in gold, and 
$5,200 in platinum. 

The “Correo Nacional ” No. 85, published a table of the exports from Buenaven- 
tura in the first, second, and third quarters of 1890 and of 1889, from which we ex- 
tract the following data : 



Gold and platinum. 


1889. 


1890. 




£9,511 

12,508 

12,995 


£14, 373 
15, 316 
16, 820 


Second quarter 


Third quarter ....... 


Total 


35,014 


46,509 





The fourth quarter of 1890 gave £15,503, so that the total for that year was 
£62,012. 

Estimating the platinum at £4,000, there remains £58,012 or $290,060 as the 
amount of gold dust exported from the said port. 

Since no mention is made in the tables sent from the port of Tumaco, of any 
exportation of £old, we wrote to SpQor Don Juan B. Ortiz, prefect of Barbacoas, ask- 
ing him the pomt of export for the gold of that rich section. 

Sefior Ortiz had the kindness to furnish us full data. Here follows the table 
which he sent us showing the gold exported in the steamers touching at Tumaco, 
as it appears in the books of the agency of the line : 



Exportation op Gold. 

V 



From Barbacoas— 


1887. 


1888. 


1889. 




$42, 175 
64, 481 
49,715 i 
5,322 ! 

i 


$48,075 
61, 312 
44,650 
13, 974 


$35, 510 
61,885 
36, 713 
16,825 


To New York 


To l’a.ris .... ... ....... 


Tn TI arnhurg. 


Total... 


161,693 | 


168,011 


150, 933 





As we lack the data for 1890 we will estimate it at $160,000, a figure which is nearly 
the average of the three preceding years. 

As it is also necessary to take into account the gold sent by land to Quito and that 
carried by individuals' to Guayaquil and Panama, localities which do considerable 
business with Barbacoas, we estimate its value to be $40,000. 

The gold exported from the department of Panama (Yeraguas and the Darien), in 
1890, can not be called less than $70,000. 

To complete the examination of the table at the beginning of this article, we have 
only to consider the ores. Those exported from Colombia are almost exclusively of 
silver, the majority of which comes from the mines of Santa Alia (Tolima). From 
Antioquia and Santander (Baja and Yetas), some tons of auriferous and argentiferous 
ores are also reported. 

It appears by the said table that 1,136,822 kilograms of ore were exported through 
the custom-house of Barranquilla, and that the declared value was $635,093, a value 
which could not have been calculated in gold, since each ton of 1,000 kilograms 
would be worth $558. The richest silver ore, at present, is that of the Frias mine. 



10285 M 18 



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274 . 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



From a statement which we have at hand, it appears that there were exported In 
1890, from that mine 691.5 tons, averaging 393 ounces of silver a ton, the total value 
of which was $289,242 (£57,848 8s.), and the value of each ton $418. 

Let us take that figure and then estimate the remaining 445 tons at the rate of $300 
a ton or $133,500, which added to the former sum gives us $422,742. 

The 16.3 tons of ore exported through Cartagena, at $300 a ton, give $4,890, a fig- 
ure which we increase to $5,170 in order to have a round sum in the r6sum6, which 
we are about to make. 

In this r 6s ume, we also include the year 1889, the details of which, previously ex- 
amined, need not be repeated. 



Value of the Precious Metals Exported from Colombia in 1889 and 1890. 



Metals. 


1880. 


1890. 




$2, 438, 883 
612,531 
93,896 
221,100 
215,000 
150,933 

40.000 

50.000 
210, 057 

9,600 


$2,470,536 
734,981 
71, 191 

165.000 
290,060 

160.000 

40.000 

70.000 
422,742 

5,170 

320 










Gold dust, Tum a co 


Gold dust, Quito, Guayaquil, and Paiiama 


Gold dust, Department of Panama 


Ore, Barranquilla 


Ore, Cartagena I 


Ore, Buenaventura 


Total 




4,042,000 


4,430,000 





The exportation of precious metals in 1887 was $3,620,000, and in 1888 $4,125,000. 
Let us make some explanations. The precious metals exported in 1890 may be 
divided as follows : 



Native gold $3, 600, 000 

Silver .' 830,000 



The total product is approximately distributed jypong the departments as follows : 



Antioquia $2, 935, 000 

Cauea 750, 000 

Tolinia 025,000 



Panama 70, 000 

Santander 30,000 

Bolivar 20, 000 



To show that the production of precious metals iu Colombia is on the increase it 
will suffice to uote the following: 

In the ninety years of this century there have been taken out of the mines 
$240,000,000 of gold and silver, Avhich gives a yearly average of $2,666,666. 

In the time of the colony the production never exceeded $3,100,000, and since 
then has only exceeded $4,000,000 in the years 1884 and 1888 to 1890, inclusive, the 
highest sum belonging to the last-named year. 

# * * * - # * * 



From what we have said in this article it will he understood that only by a real 
tour de foi'ce would it be possible to ascertain the true value of the precious metals 
exported year by year. 

The same could be said of all the products which nourish our foreign commerce — ~ 
coftee, tobacco, etc. 

In the matter of statistics, a science so necessary for good administration, we are 
very backward. 

• ••••** 

Vicente Restrepo. 



BOLIVIA. 



Legation of the United States, 

La Paz, November 15, 1890 . 

Sir : I have the honor, pursuant to instructions from the Department of State, to 
submit the following report upon the production, export, import, and coinage of gold 
and silver in Bolivia for the calendar year 1889, which is intended to cover the 
eleven questions submitted for answer through Department circular of December 18. 
1889. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



275 



Answers to interrogatories , 1889 . * 

(1) There was no coinage of either gold or silver during the calendar year 1889. 
In a note just received from the minister of foreign relations upon the subject, a 
copy of which and translation thereof I have forwarded to the Secretary of State 
under cover of my No. 17 of this date, he says : “This is due to several causes among 
which is that gold (and silver) is being exported in bulliou because of its high price 
abroad and exemption from export duty.” 

(2) In the absence of reliable statistics I am unable to even approximately state 
the production, import, or export of gold and silver for4;he calendar year 1889. In 
the note of the minister of foreign relations referred to he says: “Our custom- 
houses have not been able to collect enough information respecting these metals to 
render that which can be given on the subject of value.” 

(3) There was no gold coin in circulation in Bolivia at the close of the calendar 
year 1889, the currency of the country consisting of national bank notes and fractional 
silver coins. 

(4) The stock of silver coin in the country at the same date can not be even approxi- 
mately stated. The total in the various banks was about 200,000 bolivianos. Owing 
to the inordinate disposition of the Indians to hoard silver this currency will soon 
practically disappear from the circulating medium of the country unless the Govern- 
ment resumes the coinage of silver at an early day. 

(5) The amount of Government and bank notes outstanding at the same date was 
4,393,184 bolivianos. 

(6) No laws were passed during the year 1889 affecting the coinage, issue, or legal- 
tender character of the metallic and paper circulation. A cabinet decree, however, 
was issued, requiring the owners of all mines producing “ pilia ” or bar silver, to de- 
liver one-fourtn of their annual product to the Government mint at Potosi for coin- 
age into 20-cent pieces. This decree, not having the force and effect of law, has not 
been complied with by any mining enterprise of the country except the Huanchaca 
Company, in which the President is largely interested. 

As the price offered by the Government for silver is about per cent less than the 
market value, I may add in passing that the standard silver boliviano weighs 25 
grams while these 20-cent pieces contain but 4.60 grams. They are coined nine- 
tenths silver and one-tenth copper, and are 8 per cent light in weight. The latest 
official data obtainable upon the production, import, and expbrt of gold and silver 
in Bolivia is that of the minister of treasury of October, 1889, transmitted to your 
Bureau by my predecessor, Hon.'S. S. Carlisle, under date of October 22 of that year. 
I have to suggest, therefore, that while I do not regard these figures as trustworthy, 
and while the annual production of the mines of Bolivia is steadily increasing, they 
may be adopted as approximately correct for the calendar year. 

In conclusion I may add that while certain that this report must prove as unsatis- 
factory to your Bureau as it is to me, I am powerless to furnish more satisfactory in- 
formation in the present chaotic condition of the so-called statistics of this country. 

I am sir, with great respect, your obedient servant, 

T. H. Anderson. 

The Director or the Mint, 

Washington , D. C. 



Legation of the United States, 

La Paz, Bolivia , January 9 , 1891. 

Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of yours of October 31 last, 
requesting me to obtain and forward to your Bureau an approximate statement as to 
the quantity of gold and silver produced from the mines of Bolivia during the year 
1890. 

The receipt of your letter here during my vacation in Peru, in December, has re- 
sulted in some delay in my reply. I regret to say that while I have faithfully 
endeavored to secure the information requested for your Bureau, I am unable to 
furnish further information than that contained in my report of November 15 last. 

In the note of the minister of foreign relations referred to tlr rein, he frankly 
states that “the custom-houses of Bolivia have not been able to collect enough in- 
formation respecting these metals to render that which can be given on the subject 
of value.” You will observe that in the note referred to the minister of foreign 
relations includes the year 1890 as well as 1889, so that his report to this legation, as 
well as my report to your Bureau of November 15, ’may be adopted as the basis of 
your estimates for 1890. I have appealed to every reliable source of information for 
the necessary data from which to furnish your Bureau with a more satisfactory 
statement, but the entire absence of system in the treasury department of Bolivia, 



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276 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



t>r of knowledge npon the subject in Government circles, have rendered my efforts 
to furnish you a satisfactory approximate statement as to the quantity of gold and 
silver produced from the mines of Bolivia wholly futile. Bolivia is practically without 
a bureau of statistics, and until the Government institutes a radical reform in this 
direction a more satisfactory report than that heretofore transmitted will be hardly 
possible. # 

I am, sir, with great respect, your obedient servant, 

Thos. H. An derson. 

The Director of the Mint, 

Washington , D. C. 



Legation of the United States, 

La Paz, Bolivia, January 19, 1891 . 

Sir: I have the honor, referring to my No: 39, dated the 17th instant, in acknowl- 
edgment of department circular dated December 10, 1890, to report that, in compli- 
ance with a similar request from Hon. E. O. Leech, Director of the Mint, dated 
October 31 last, I gave him, in a communication dated the 9th instant, all obtainable 
information in relation to the quantity of gold and silver produced from the mines 
of Bolivia during the year 1890. This communication, together with my report for 
1889, transmitted to the Director of the Mint under date of November 15, 1890, will 
fur ni sly the Bureau with all the data applicable to 1890 at my command in the pres- 
ent disorganized condition of the treasury department of Bolivia. As stated in my 
communication of the 9th instant to the Director of the Mint, “ Bolivia is practi- 
cally without a bureau of statistics, and until the Government institutes a radical 
reform in this direction, a more satisfactory report than that heretofore transmitted 
will be hardly possible." 

I am, sir, with great respect, your obedient servant, 

Thos. H. Anderson. 

The Secretary of State, 

Washington, D. C. 



Legation of the United States, 

La Paz, Bolivia, February 28, 1891 . 

Sir : Replying to yours of December 27 last, which reached me but a few days ago, 
I have to say that the explanation for the absence of reliable statistics in relation to 
the annual product of silver from the mines of Bolivia, or export of the precious 
metals from this country, is found in the pernicious system of this Republic in farm- 
ing out its public revenues to the highest bidder. In December of each year the 
Government receives sealed proposals for the collection of the export duties upon 
silver (gold not being subjected to export duty) for the ensuing calendar year, and 
the contract awarded to the highest bidder, who, having secured to the Government 
the amount so agreed to be paid, is under no further obligations to the Government 
in relation to the revenues to be by him collected. 

The duties are then collected in this way — I will take for illustration the depart- 
ment of La Paz : Any person desiring to export silver from this department, reports 
to the collector residing in this city the amount and value of his proposed shipment, 
deposits with him samples of Bame and pays an export duty of 60 cents on each marco 
of silver from ores of the value of one marco up to 250 per cajon of 50 quintals, and 
80 cents per marco on bar silver. He then receives the collector's certificate, which 
authorizes him to deliver the silver ores, or bar silver, as the case may be, upon which 
he has thus paid the duty, at either of the four Atlantic ports of Bolivia through 
which it must pass, viz : Mollendo, Arica, Iguigue, or Autofagasta. He then presents 
this certificate to the agent of the collector, who, having examined the silver offered 
for shipment and finding it covered by the certificate, issues the necessary and final 
order for its export. 

It will be readily understood from this that the collector, not being required by 
law to report to the Government or account thereto for the amount so collected by 
him during the year, maintains the closest secrecy upon this point, so that the dis- 
closure of his profits may not bring in competition with him other bidders for the 
ensuing year. Therefore it is that neither the Government of Bolivia nor foreign 
representatives accredited thereto are able to furnish reliable data upon this sub- 
ject. I see but one possible way of securing the desired information for your 
Bureau, and which I shall adopt for the present year, viz: The government mint at 
Potosi, to which the one-fifth of the silver produced by the mines of Bolivia must be sold 

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277 



EEPOET OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 

and delivered at a certain price, having resumed the coinage of silver at the begin- 
ning of this year, and four of the principal mines of the country being required by 
a special act of the Congress to pay the duties named directly to the Government 
instead of to collectors as described, the foreign office can and has promised to furnish 
me with the data obtainable from this source, while for the remaining data I shall 
address a note to each of the collectors requesting thfcm to give me, for the sole use 
of your Bureau the amount of silver exported from their several departments. If I 
can thus secure this voluntary information from the collectors — but which is ex- 
tremely doubtful) — and can then supplement it with the Government data referred 
to, I will be able to furnish your Bureau with reliable statistics upon this subject, 
otherwise I shall not be able to materially improve upon my reports of November 
15 and January 9 last. 

I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

' Thos. H. Anderson. 

The Director of the Mint, 

Washington , D. C. 



PERU. 



Legation of the United States, 

Lima, December 5, 1890. 

Dear Sir : Aftef waiting many weeks and making several visits and sending a num- 
ber of notes, I have finally succeeded in procuring a report on the gold and silver coin- 
age of Poru for the year 1889, and I send herewith a copy of the same, in accordance 
with your request. 

I will make a personal application at once for the same data for the current year, 
1890. 

I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

John Hicks. 



The Director of the Mint, 

Washington, D. C. 



[National Mint, Lima, December 1, 1890.) 

Foreign Office, Lima, December 1 , 1890 . 
Mr. Director : In compliance with your order it is agreeable for me to transmit a 
report of the coinage and exportation for the past year of 1889. 

Coinage, 1889. 

There has been coined 1,271 bars of silver, weighing 66,019.298 kilograms, which 
equal in sols (or dollars), 2,842,530. 



Exportation. 

There has been exported : 

Gold bars, 88, weighing 

Gold coin 

Gold dust 

Old gold plate 

Silver bars, weighing 

Old silver plate 

Coined silver 

God guard your excellency. 

A copy. 

Charles Wiesse. 



kilograms.. 138.004 

sols.. 217f 

...ounces.. 57f 

kilograms.. 600 

do... 88.087 

do... .215 

sols.. 1,299,782 



Ml. Garcia Yrigoyen. 



Legation of the United States, 

Lima, Peru, January SO, 1891. 

Dear Sir: In accordance with the instructions of the Department of State, dated 
December 10, 1890, I have the honor to submit the following reports in regara to the 
gold and silver coinage of Peru for the year 1890. 

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27 $ 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



Answers to interrogatories , 1890. 

(1) No goffi was coined during the year. 

(2) Following is a statement of the silver coined as appears by the report of the 
director of Peruvian mint: 



Sols. 

Peruvian sols 2,304,000 

Two-real pieces .* 17, 000 

One-real pieces 40, 000 

Five centavos 39, 000 

Sucres for Ecuador 287, 118 



Total 2, 687, 118 



v3) Exportation of gold, 77 bars; weight, 103.348 kilograms. 

(4) Exportation of silver, 28 bars; weight, 1,135.319 kilograms. 

(5, 6, 7, 8, and 9) No report. 

(10) None. 

Your obedient servant, 

John Hicks. 

The Director of the Mint, 

Washington, D. C. 

By a government decree the old Peruvian coins and a large number of Bolivian 4- 
real pieces which had no currency in the north of Peru, but were received at their 
full value in the south, have been withdrawn from circulation. As a result of this 
measure, importing houses are no longer compelled to accept these coins in payment 
at their full value, but only at a heavy discount. In consequence of this the coins 
referred to were bought up by speculators at a discount and shipped in part to Lima, 
but mostly to Europe to be melted down. The only coins now used in trade are the 
silver soles and the pieces of 50, 20, 10, and 5 centavos. ( Handles- Ar chi v., August, 
1889, p. 503.) 



VENEZUELA. 

Legation of the United States, 
Caracas, January 18, 1891. 

Sir : Replying to the interrogatories in Department's circular of December 10 last, 
I have to report that there was no coinage of either gold or silver in Venezuela dur- 
ing the year 1890, and there were no gold or silver coins withdrawn from circulation. 

It is not possible to ascertain the amount of foreign gold coins imported during 
the year. The importation of foreign silver coin is prohibited. 

During the first eleven months of the year the amount of gold produced from the 
mines ofthe country was 2,027.76 kilograms, valued at, say, $1,060,977.48. There are 
no reports, official or other, of any products of silver. 

Owing to the total lack of statistical reports, it is quite impossible to say what 
may have been the stock of gold or silver bullion in the country at the close of the 
calendar year. 

The amount of bank notes outstanding at the close of the year was 3,760,000 boli- 
vars, in denominations of 1,000, 500, 100, 50, and 20 bolivars each. These notes were 
issued by the Bank of Venezuela, which, however, is merely the fiscal agent of the 
Government. 

There was no legislation during the year affecting the coinage. The coinage of 
both gold and silver was stopped during the latter part, of the year 1889, and has 
not been resumed. 

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, 

William L. Scruggs. 

The Secretary of State, 

Washington, D. (7. 



HAWAIIAN ISLANDS. 

Department of Finance, 

Honolulu, December 81, 1890. 

SIR: In answer to your communication of the 30th instant, transmitting copy of a 
circular issued by the State Department at Washington to its diplomatic agent here, 
asking for answers to certain questions relating to the currency and coinage, I . 
would say with regard to interrogatories 1, 2, 5, and 6 that this country not being a 

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REPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 279 

producer of the precious metals, no transactions of the kind have ever taken place. 

The import of gold coin for 1890 was $776,000. 

No silver coin was imported during that period. 

The approximate stock of gold coin in the Kingdom at the close of 1890 can only 
be estimated. Considerable amounts are, without doubt, sent abroad by private hands 
of which no reliable estimate can be made. The importations of United States gold 
coin for the last four years have been $4,023,000, and it is perhaps safe to say that the 
approximate stock of gold coin in the country to-day is $3,000,000. 

The amount of silver coin in circulation is $1,000,000. The amount of Government 
certificates of deposit or notes outstanding is $137,000. 

No legislation affecting the coinage, etc., was enacted during the last session of 
the legislature. 

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, 

Godfrey Brown 
Minister of Finance . 

John A. Cummins, 

Minister of Foreign Affairs . 



HAYTL 



Legation of the United States, 

Port au Prince, January 20, 1891. 

Sir : In compliance with the instructions of the Department of State’s circular, 
dated December 10, 1890, 1 have the honor to send you herewith answers to the 
eleven questions propounded in the circular, as follows : 

Answers to interrogatories, 1890. 



(1) No gold was coined or recoined in Hayti during the calendar year 1890. 

(2) No silver was recoined during the year. But, to the value of $300,000, silver 
coins were struck off in Paris by order of this Government, according to a project of 
law voted by the Corps Legislatif on the 3d of* September last. The money thus 
coined was : 



In pieces of 50 cents each $50, 000 

In pieces of 20 cents each 150, 000 

In pieces of 10 cents each 100, 000 

Amounting to 300,000 



These pieces are on the basis of the smaller French coins and are of .835 fineness. 

(3) It is estimated that about $600,000, all in American gold coin, was imported 
here in 1890, and that about $300,000 was taken out of the country during the same 
period, chiefly by citizens and other residents who go abroad in the summer months, 
and by masters and agents of sailing vessels for freight. 

(4) It is believed that no silver was exported, and that, with the important ex- 
ception noted in answer to question No. 2, none was imported in 1890. 

(5 and 6) There are no mines of gold or silver worked, or, at present, located in 
Hayti. 

(7) The stock of gold in the country at the end of 1890 may be estimated at 
$2,300,000. (See answer to this question in my report of March 13, 1890, and see also 
answer to question No. 3 above.) 

(8) The amount of silver in the country at the end of last year may be put at 
$2,800,000 (See my report of March 13, 1890, and see also my answer to question No. 
2 above.) 

(9) Since my report of March 13, 1890, above referred to, paper money has been 
withdrawn from circulation as follows : 



Of the issue of the Solomon Government $388, 125 

Of the issue of the revolution of the North 525, 000 

Of the issue of the National bank 12. 625 

Of fractional paper currency 17, 732 



Total of paper currency withdrawn from circulation during the yew 1890 943, 482 

The amount of Government and bank notes outstanding at the end of 1889 (see 
my report of March 13, 1890), was $5,546,352 ; the amount since withdrawn is $943,482 ; 
leaving still outstanding $4,602,870. But of these there are in notes of $5, which 
were issued by the Legitime administration but not yet recognized by the present 



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280 . 



REPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. 



government, $499,995; deducting this from total of notes outstanding, we have of 
them in actual circulation, $4,102,875. 

(10) The only laws passed in 1890 affecting the coinage, issue, or legal- tender cir- 
culation was the law of September 3, authorizing the coinage of $300,000 as above 
referred to in answer to question No. 2, and there was also the executive measure 
adopted in February for the retiring of $1,000,000 paper from circulation. 

(11) There is no mint in Hayti. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Frederick Douglass. 

The Director of thi; Mint, 

Washington, D. C. 



LIBERIA* 



Legation of the United States, 

Monrovia , February 5, 1891 . 

Sir: I had the honor to receive an official circular from the Secretary of State, 
dated December 10, 1890. Said circular contained interrogatories from the Secretary 
of the Treasury under date of December 3, 1890, and according to instructions in 
said circular I have the honor respectfully to submit the following report, etc. 



Answers to interrogatories , 1890. 



(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6) The Republic of Liberia has no mint, coins no gold, silver, nor 
metals of any kind as money. 

(7 and 8) I have no means by which I can estimate or approximate it, there be- 
ing no records here to these ends. 

(9) The amount of government liability or debts may be summed up as follows : 



Foreign debt 

Consolidated debt 

Circulating or floating currency 
Outstanding notes 



$ 1 , 000 , 00° 
06, 00® 

25.000 

35. 000 



(10) There have been no laws passed during the year 1890 affecting the monetary 
relations or its circulation. 

(11) There has been nothing printed or published upon the aforementioned dur- 
ing 1890. 

I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

Alexander Clark, 

United States Minister Resident and Consul-General, 



The Director of the Mint, 

Washington , Z). G» 



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INDEX 



Pag*. 

Acid refineries, use of by-products reeommen ded 81, 32 

work of 1891 10 

Africa, British coinage of 1890 193 

production of 1888, 1889 and 1890 194, 195 

Alabama, production of gold and silver, 1890 55 

Alaska, production of gold and silver, 1890 55 

Amendment of law as to parting and refining recommended 91-94 

Annual assay commission, 1891, members of 66 

report of 67 

tables of assays 172, 173 

Appropriations and expenditures, 1891 28-31 

1892 31 

estimates for 1893 31 

Argentine Republic, coinage of 1888 192 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 266-268 

monetary statistics of 130 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 ^ 194, 195 

Arizona, production of gold and silver, 1890 55 

Arts and manufactures, employment of gold and silver in 50-54 

Assay, annual, members of commission 66 

report of commission 67 

tables of assays 172, 173 

offices, minor, bullion operations of 94 

Assets and liabilities, mints and assay offices, June 30, 1891 156, 157 

Australasia, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 222, 223 

monetary statistics of 124 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

Austria-Hungary, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of.... 239-242 

monetary statistics of 128 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

Average price of silver in London, calendar year 1890 19 

fiscal year 1891 18 

since 1833 189 

Banks, National, coin holdings, July 1, 1891 46 

Bars, gold, exchanged for gold coin, 1891 - 8, 9 

increased charges on small 8, 9 

manufactured, 1891 .* 6 

tables of 148,149 

shipped abroad, 1891 34-38 

Belgium dispatch relative to monetary condition of 229-233 

monetary statistics of . 125 

Blanks purchased for minor coinage „ . . 27 

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INDEX. 



Pago. 

Bois6 City assay office, operations and expenses of, 1891 . 116,117 

Bolivia, coinage of, 1888 192 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 229-233 

monetary statistics of 131 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

Brazil, coinage of, 1888 192 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

British Africa, coinage of, 1890 193 

Guiana, production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194,195 

India, production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 223-225 

Bullion, deposited and purchased, 1891 3-5 

tables of 136-147 

imported and exported, 1891 39-44 

table of 174-185 

in mints and assay offices, June 30, 1891 45 

November 1, 1891 47 

operated on by coiners 94,95 

melters and refiners 94, 95 

purchased for silver-dollar coinage, act of February 28, 1878 11 

July 14, 1890 11-17 

tables of 161-171 

refined at mints and New York assay office 10 

value of the silver dollar, 1873 to 1890 19 

wasted by operative officers, 1891 95 

Bureau of the Mint, expenses of, 1891 ; 30 

work of 133 

By-products of acid refineries, sale of 31, 32 

California, production of gold and silver, 1890 55 

Canada, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 . . . . . 192, 193 

monetary statistics of 124 ' 

production of, 1888, 1889 ; and 1890 194, 195 

Carson mint, deposits and operations 110, 111 

Central American States, production of 1888, 1889, and 1890 1... 194,195 

Changes in regulations . . 67,68 

value of foreign coins 57-65 

Charges collected, and expenses of parting and refining 32 

imposed on gold bars 8, 9 

Charlotte assay office, operations of, 1891 117, 118 

Chili, coinage of, 1888 192 

production of 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 • 

China, coinage of 1888 and 1889 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 254, 255 

monetary statistics of 133 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

Circulation and metallic reserves of European banks 49 

coinage, and ownership of silver dollars 21 

of national banks, July 1, 1891 45 

silver dollars 21 

Classified expenditures of the Mint service, 1891 33, 34 

Coin, changes in value of foreign 57-65 

circulation of United States, July 1, 1891 64 

November 1, 1891 ... 47 

employment of, in arts 50-54 

foreign, estimate of value of 57-65 

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INDEX, 



283 



Page. 

Coin, minor, demand for.. 27 

distribution of 27 

stock of, in the United States, July 1, 1891 44 

November 1, 1891 47 

Coinage and medal dies manufactured 1891 6, 7, 159 

cost of, 1891 96 

minor 5, 6, 27, 28 

profits on . 152 

of mints, 1891 5, 6 

table of 150, 151 

calendar year 1890 150, 151 

from organization, table of 196-219 

silver dollars, ownership and circulation 21 

profits on 26 

subsidiary silver, 1891 22, 24 

profits on . . . 22, 23 

World, 1888, 1889, and 1890 1 56, 57 

table of 192,193 

Coining operations, 1891 94, 95 

Coins, new designs of 68-76 

Colombia, coinage of, 1888 and 1889 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 268-274 

monetary statistics of 131, 132 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

Colorado, production of gold and silver in, 1890 55 

Copper matte exported, 1891 *. 43 

Costa Rica, coinage of, 1889 . 193 

Cost of coinage, 1891 96 

silver, 1891 10-17 

Course of silver, 1891 17-21 

Deliveries on silver purchases, 1891 10-17 

from March 1, 1878 11 

Demand for minor coins 27 

Denmark, coinage of 1888, 1889, and 1890 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 247 

monetary statistics of 129 

Denver mint, operations of, 1891 114,115 

Deposits and purchases of gold and silver, 1891 3-5 

tables of 136-148 

Designs adopted for new coins 68-76 

Dies and medals manufactured 6, -7, 158, 159 

Dispatches from United States legations (or consulates) — 

Relative to monetary condition of Argentine Republic 266^268 

Australasia 222, 223 

Austria-Hungary 239-242 

Belgium 229-233 

Bolivia 274-277 

British India 223-225 

China 254,255 

Colombia 268-274 

Demnark 247 

France 225-229 

Germany * 242-245 

Great Britain 220-222 

Greece 235,236 

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INDEX. 



Page. 

Dispatches from United States legations (or consulates) — Continued. 



Relative to monetary condition of Hawaiian Islands 278, 279 

Hayti 279, 280 - 

India 223-225 

Italy I 234,235 

Japan.....* 252-254 

Liberia 280 

Mexico 256-266 

Netherlands 245-247 

Nicaragua 260 

Norway 247,248 

Peru 277, 278 

Portugal 1 238 

Russia 250-252 

Spain 236-238 

Sweden 248,249 

Switzerland 233 

Venezuela 278 

Distribution of minor coins 28 

expenditures for 160 

silver dollars 21 

expenditures for 160 

Domestic production of gold and silver from organization of mint 188 

Dutch Guiana, production of 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

Earnings and expenditures, 1891 32, 33 

table of 152,153 

of refineries, 1891 31, 32 

Ecuador, coinage of, 1888 192 

Egypt, coinage of, 1888 192 

Employment of gold and silver in the arts 50-64 

Eritrea (Italian colony), coinage of, 1890 193 

Estimate of value of foreign coins .; 57-65 

Exchange of gold bars for gold coin, 1891 8, 9 

Expenditures and appropriations, 1891 28-31 

and earnings, 1891 * 32, 33 

for distribution of minor coins, table of 160 

silver coins, table of 160 

supplies, classified 33, 34 

Exports and imports of precious metals, 1891 39-44 

tables of 174-181 

by countries 182-185 

of copper matte 43 

gold and silver, loss by, 1891 39-44 

silver from London 20,21 

Fluctuations in price of silver 17-21 

Foreign coins, changes in value of 57-65 

deposits of, 1891 3, 4, 136-139 

estimate of value of. 57-65 

France, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 225-229 

monetary statistics of 124,125 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

stock of money 49 

French colonies, coinage of 1890 193 



Georgia, production of gold and silver, 1890 



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INDEX. 

Pago. 

Germany, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 . 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 242-245 

monetary statistics of 127 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

stock of money * 49 

Gold and silver bullion in mints and assay offices, July 1, 1891 45 

November 1, 1891 .... 47 

coin in the United States, July 1, 1891 44 

November 1, 1891 47 

imports and exports of, 1891 39, 44 

tables of 174-185 

used in the arts and manufactures 50-64 

bars exchanged for gold coin, 1891 8, 9 

increased charges on small 8,9 

manufactured, 1891 6 

tables of 148, 149 

bullion and coin, imports of, at New York, July 1, to October 1, 1891. . 38 

coinage, 1891 . 5,6 

table of 150,151 

calendar year, 1890 150, 151 

deposits, 1891 3, 5 

table of 136-148 

1880-1891 5 

employment of, in arts in the United States 50-54 

exported, 1891 . 40 

• table of 176-185 

imported, 1891 * 39 

table of 174-185 

movement of, from the United States : 34-39 

produced in the United States, 1890 54, 55 

from' 1792 191 

world, 1873 to 1890 : 56 

table of 194, 195 

recoinages, 1889 and 1890 57 

shipments from United States 34-39 

Great Britain, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 220-222 

monetary statistics of 122-124 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 i 194, 195 

stock of money .1 49 

Greece, dispatch relative to monetary condition of 235, 236 

monetary sta tistics of 126 

Great Commora, coinage of, 1890 - 193 

Guiana, British, production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

Dutch, production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

Hawaiian Islands, dispatch relative to monetary condition of 278, 279 

monetary statistics of 132 

Hayti, coinage of, 1890 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 279, 280 

monetary statistics of 132 

Helena assay office, operations of, 1891 115, 116 

Highest, lowest, and average price of silver in London, 1891 18 

calendar year 1890. 19 

since 1833 189 

value of the silver dollar since 1873 19 

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INDEX. 



Holland. ( See Netherlands.) 

Hong-Kong, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 192, 193 

Idaho, production of gold and silver, 1890 55 

Increased charges on small gold bars 8, 9 

Imports and exports of gold and silver, 1891 39-44 

tables of 174-185 

of gold bullion and coin at New York, July 1 to October 1, 1891 38 

silver ores, 1891 *, 41 

India, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 223-225 

monetary statistics of 124 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

shipment of silver to 20, 21 

Industrial arts, employment of gold and silver 50-54 

Italy, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condtiion of 234, 235 

monetary statistics of 126 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, \95 

Japan, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 252-254 

monetary statistics of 132, 133 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 . 194, 195 

Lead ores imported, 1891 41 

Liabilities and assets of mints and assay offices * 156, 157 

Liberia, dispatch relative to monetary condition of 280 

Loss of gold by export, 1891 . 40 

Lowest, highest, and average price of silver in London 18, 19, 189 

Maryland, production of gold and silver in, 1890 55 

Medals and dies manufactured, 1891 6, 7, 158, 159 

proof coins sold, 1891 7 

profits on . . 7 

Melters and refiners’ operations, 1891 94, 95 

Metallic and paper money in United States, July 1, 1891 45 

November 1, 1891 47 

reserves and circulation of Europe 49 

Mexico, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of.... 256 

monetary statistics of 131 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

Michigan, production of gold and silver, 1890 55 

Minor coinage, 1891 - 27, 28 

blanks purchased for 27 

profits on 152 

coins, demand for 27 

distribution of 28 

expenditure for, table of 160 

Mint at Philadelphia, law authorizing new building renewed 77-91 

Mints and assay offices, operations of, 1891 * 31 

Monetary statistics of foreign countries 120-133 

Argentine Republic «. 130 

Australasia 124 

Austria-Hungary 128 

Belgium 125 

Bolivia 131 



Canada 



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Page. 

Monetary statistics of foreign countries — Continued. 

China 133 

Colombia . 131,132 

Denmark * . 129 

France T. 124, 125 

Germany . 127 

Great Britain . 122-124 

Greece 126 

Hawaiian Islands 132 

Hayti.... 132 

India , 124 

Italy 126 

Japan 132,133 

Mexico 131 

Netherlands 128; 129 

Nicaragua 132 

Norway . 129 

Peru 131 

Portugal 127 

Roumania 130 

Russia . 130 

Scandinavian Union 129 

Spain 127 

Sweden 129 

Switzerland 126 

Turkey 130 

Venezuela 131 

Money, metallic and paper, in United States, July 1*, 1891 45 

November 1, 1891 47 

Montana, production of gold and silver, 1890 55 

Movement of gold from United States, 1891 34-39 

National banks, circulation of, July 1, 1891 46 

Netherlands, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 245-247 

monetary statistics of 128, 129 

Nevada, production of gold and silver in, 1890. 55 

New designs for coins 68-76 

New Mexico, production of gold and silver in, 1890 55 

New mint at Philadelphia recommended * 77-91 

New Orleans mint, deposits and operations, 1891 107-110 

New regulations promulgated 67, 68 

New York assay office, deposits and operations, 1891 112-114 

Nicaragua, dispatch relative to monetary condition of 4 245-247 

monetary statistics of 132 

North Carolina, production of gold and silver in, 1890 55 

Norway, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 247, 248 

monetary statistics of 129 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

Operations and expenses of Bois6 City assay office 116, 117 

Carson mint 110,111 

Charlotte assay office 117, 118 

Denver mint 114, 115 

Helena assay office 115, 116 

New Orleans mint .. 107-110 



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Pag®. 

Operations -and expenses of New York assay office 112-114 

Philadelphia mint 90-102 

St. Louis assay office 118, 119 

• San Francisco mint 102-107 

Operative wastage, 1891 . 152-161 

Oregon, production of gold and silver in, 1890 55 

Ores, imports and exports of gold and silver 41 

table of 180,181 

Ownership, circulation, and coinage of silver dollars 21 

of gold and silver in the United States, July 1, 1891 46 

Paper and metallic money in the United States, July 1, 1891 46 

' November 1, 1891 48 

Parting and refining bullion, amendment of laws regarding 91-94 

charges collected and expenses, 1891 32 

Peru, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of. 277, 278 

monetary statistics of 131 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

Philadelphia mint, deposits and operations, 1891 96-102 

new building 77-91 

' Portugal, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of..; , 238 

monetary statistics of 127 

Price of silver, 1891 17-21 

Product of acid refineries, 1891 10, 54 

gold and silver in United States, 1890 54-56 

from organization of Mint 191 

world, 1873 to 1890 565 

table of 194, 19 

Product of gold and silver in Australia 223 

Profits on medals and proof coins, 1891 7 

minor coinage, 1891 152 

silver-dollar coinage, 1891 26 

since 1878 26 

subsidiary silver coinage, 1891. 22-24 

Proof coins and medals sold, 1891 7 

Purchase of silver bullion : 10-17 

act of February 28, 1878 10, 11, 14 

July 14, 1890 12-17 

tables of 162-171 

Ratio of silver to gold each year since 1687 190 

Receipts from sale of blue vitriol and spent acid. 31, 32 

Recoinages by countries, 1889 and 1890 57 

of subsidiary silver coins in the Treasury 22,23 

trade dollars 24, 26 

Refinery earnings and expenditures, 1891 31 

Refining by acid, 1891 10 

Regulations, changes in 67, 68 

Ron mania, monetary statistics of 130 

Russia, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 250-252 

monetary statistics of 130 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

St. Louis assay office, operations of, 1891 118,119 

Sale of by-products of acid refineries 31, 32 

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289 



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San Francisco mint, deposits and operations of, 1891 102-107 

Scandinavian Union, monetary statistics of 129 

Seigniorage on silver-dollar coinage, 1891 26, 27 

since 1878 26 

table of 154, 155 

subsidiary silver coinage, 1891 22-24 

Shipments of gold from the United States 34-39 

Siam, coinage of, 1889 - 193 

Silver and gold coin in the United States, July 1, 1891 44 

November 1, 1891 47 

lost by export, 1891 40 

product of 1890 • 54 

average price of, 1891 18 

1890 (calendar year) 19 

since 1833 189 

bars manufactured, 1891 6 

tables of 148,149 

bullion purchases 10-17 

coinage of United States, 1891 5, 6 

table of 150,151 

calendar year 1890 150, 151 

from organization of Mint 196-219 

world, 1888, 1889, and 1890 192, 193 

coins, recoinage of uncurrent 22-26 

cost of, 1891 10-17 

course of 17-21 

deposits, 1891 3-5 

tables of 136-148 

dollar circulation 21 

coinage, seigniorage on 26, 27 

table of 154,155 

highest, lowest, and average value of, since 1873 19 

value at commercial price 29 

dollars, coinage, ownership, and circulation of 21 

distributed 21 

employment of, in arts 50-54 

fluctuations in price of 17-21 

highest, lowest, and average price of, in London, calendar year 1890. 19 

fiscal year 1891 18 

imports and exports of 39-44 

tables of 174-185 

lead ores imported, 1891 41 

ore imported into United States, 1891 41 

price paid during 1891 11-17 

product of United States 54, 55 

tables of 194,195 

world, 1873 to 1890 56 

table of 194,195 

profits, 1891 26,27 

table of 154,155 

purchases, 1891 19-17 

tables of 162-171 

recoinages, 1889 and 1890 22-26, 57 

shipments of, to India 20 

10285 M 19 



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290 



INDEX. 



Page. 

Silver, subsidiary, coinage of, 1891 22-24 

profits on 22-24 

South Africa, coinage of 1890 193 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

South Carolina, production of gold and silver in, 1890 55 

South Dakota, production of gold and silver in, 1890 55 

Spain, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 192,193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 230-238 

monetary statistics of 127 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

Special tests of coins 66 

Statistics, monetary, of foreign countries 220-280 

abstracts of 120-133 

Stock of coin in United States, July 1, 1891 44-48 

November 1, 1891 47 

money in Europe 49 

United States 44-49 

Straits Settlements, coinage of 1888, 1889 192, 193 

Subsidiary silver coinage, 1891 22-24 

profits on 22-24 

coins in the Treasury 23 

Summary of operations of mints and assay offices 94-120 

Sweden, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 248-249 

monetary statistics of 129 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

Switzerland, coinage of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 : 192, 193 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 233 

monetary statistics of 126 

Tables (in the Appendix) : 

Assets and liabilities, June 30, 1891 156, 157 

A ssays, monthly and annual 172, 173 

Bars manufactured, expressed in coining value 148, 149 

standard ounces 148,149 

Coinage and medal dies manufactured 159 

calendar year 1890 150,151 

fiscal year 1891 150,151 

of the mints of the United States, by calendar years, from 1793. . 196-219 ' 

various countries, 1888, 1889, and 1890 192, 193 

Comparison of business of mints and assay offices 186, 187 

Cost of silver contracted for, delivered, and coined each month 161-171 

Deposits and purchases of gold and silver, by value 138, 139 

weight 136, 137 

of gold and silver from organization of Mint 188 

of domestic production, by value 142, 143 

by weight 140, 141 

silver of domestic production, by value 146, 147 

by weight 144, 145 

Earnings and expenditures 152,153 

Expenditures for distribution of minor coin 160 

silver coin 160 

Exports, by countries, of domestic gold and silver 176, 177 

foreign gold and silver 178, 179 

Highest, lowest, and average price of silver each year since 1833 189 

Imports and exports of coin and bullion, 1891 174-180 



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INDEX. 291 

Page. 

Tables (in the Appendix) — Continued. 

Imports and exports of gold and silver ores, 1891 181 

by countries, 1891 182-185 

Medals manufactured, 1891 158, 159 

Monetary statistics of foreign countries 220-280 

Production of gold and siver in the United States from 1792 to 1890 191 

Ratio of silver to gold each year since 1687 190 

Seigniorage on silver, 1891 154, 155 

Silver bullion purchased, act February 28, 1878.... 161 

July 14, 1890 162 

both acts 163 

employed in coinage, by institutions 164-171 

Wastage and loss on sale of sweeps : 161 . 

World's production of gold and silver, 1888, 1889, and 1890. 194, 195 

Tennessee, production of gold and silver, 1890 55 

Tests of coins, special 66 

Texas, production of gold and silver, 1890 55 

Trade dollar, redemption and recoinage 24-26 

Transfers of uncurrent coin for recoinage 23 

Treasury, coin in, July 1, 1891 46 

November 1, 1891 48 

Turkey, coinage of, 1888 and 1890 * 192, 193 

monetary statistics of 130 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

Unexpended appropriations, 1891 30 

United States, coinage of 1888, 1889, 1890 192, 193 

stock of money in 44-49 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 55, 194, 195 

Use of by-products for expenses of refinery recommended 31, 32 

Utah, production of gold and silver, 1890 55 

Values of foreign coins 57-65 

silver dollar, at commercial price 20 

Venezuela, coinage of, 1888 * 192 

dispatch relative to monetary condition of 278 

monetary statistics of 131 

production of, 1888, 1889, and 1890 194, 195 

Vermont, production of gold and silver, 1890 % 55 

Virginia, production of gold and silver, 1890 55 

Washington, production of gold and silver, 1890 55 

Wastage of bullion by operative officers, 1891 ' 152, 161 

Work of acid refineries, 1891 10 

the Bureau of the Mint 133 

World's coinage, 1888, 1889, and 1890 56, 57 

table of 192, 193 

production of gold and silver, 1873 to 1890 56 

table of 194, 195 

Wyoming, production of gold and silver, 1890 55 

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